THEMOVE
THEMOVE
Nov 9, 2020
2020 Vuelta and Season wrap up
Play • 35 min

Primož Roglič repeats at the Vuelta. The guys take a look back at the Slovenian's historic season as he makes it two in a row in Spain. They also hand out season ending awards to Deceuninck–Quick-Step, Team Sunweb and Jumbo–Visma.

THEMOVE is presented by OURA. Visit OURA to learn more about the most accurate sleep and health device on the market.

Today's episode is brought to you by PowerDot. Our listener's get 20% of their purchase using the code THEMOVE at checkout. 

Visit LMNT to order your next electrolyte drink mix. 

The Greg Bennett Show
The Greg Bennett Show
Greg Bennett
Ryan Bolton - Olympian - Ironman and Marathon Champion Coach
Ryan Bolton is a former professional Triathlete and Olympian and now one of the world’s greatest endurance coaches.With a successful college running career, he made the move to Triathlon and represented the USA at the 2000 Sydney, Olympic Games, and post-Olympics had great success in the world of Ironman.Combined with his studies in exercise physiology, and master’s in human nutrition, with an emphasis on stress metabolism, He has the perfect background for top-level coaching.He’s coaching some of the world's greatest endurance athletes including Ironman Ben Hoffman who I had on the show a couple of months back, Boston Marathon champion Caroline Rotich, and young up-and-coming Triathlon star Sam Long.He’s the founder and head coach at Bolton Endurance and the director of the Harambee (pronounced huh-RAHM-bay) project – which is a group of elite distance runners in Sante Fe, New Mexico. And is also working with USA Triathlon as a technical advisor.One of the great talents of the world of Triathlon.In this episode, Ryan discusses his journey into the world of Triathlon, some of his regrets as an athlete, and his transition from athlete to coaching. He shares how he works with each of his incredible athletes, getting them ready for their respective goals. He describes the incredible joy he receives when his athletes achieve and how that joy is far superior to his own moments of success... including the Olympic Games experience.Ryan is fully invested with each of his athletes and is doing everything he possibly can to make them the greatest.
1 hr 41 min
Ask a Cycling Coach - TrainerRoad Podcast
Ask a Cycling Coach - TrainerRoad Podcast
TrainerRoad
Detraining, Is Recovery Trainable, Mental Health and More – Ask a Cycling Coach 293
How quickly do you lose fitness and how quickly does it come back, do you get better at recovering as your training experience increases, how to improve your mental relationship with cycling and much more in Episode 293 of the Ask a Cycling Coach Podcast! Alex Wild's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/alexwildmtb Find mentioned studies and products from this episode: https://www.TrainerRoad.com/forum ------------------------------------------------------------------ ABOUT TRAINERROAD — CYCLING’S MOST EFFECTIVE TRAINING SYSTEM TrainerRoad makes cyclists faster. Athletes get structured indoor workouts, science-backed training plans, and easy-to-use performance analysis tools to reach their goals. Build Your Custom Plan: https://bit.ly/33cAtM1 Train Together with Group Workouts: https://bit.ly/3i7niAd Get Started: https://bit.ly/3mZTetS ------------------------------------------------------------------ TOPICS COVERED IN THIS EPISODE * Coach Chad’s 2021 New Year’s Resolutions * Do you get better at recovering with more training experience? * Why riding singletrack can be surprisingly tricky * How to balance interval training with skills training * The Science of Getting Faster podcast * Should you do long rides on the weekends? * How to fuel during threshold intervals? * What to do if you’ve failed a ramp test * How much do you have to train to maintain fitness? * Does fitness actually come back quickly? * How to improve your mental relationship with sport ------------------------------------------------------------------ SUCCESSFUL ATHLETES PODCAST * iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/successful-athletes-podcast-presented-by-trainerroad/id1516326667 * Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9zdWNjZXNzZnVsYXRobGV0ZXMubGlic3luLmNvbS9yc3M?hl=en * YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLrKJ0zeMQrI4ViIjWs8xnCiBCYoay5U0B ------------------------------------------------------------------ RESOURCES AND STUDIES REFERENCED IN THIS EPISODE - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/333440022_To_me_to_you_How_you_say_things_matters_for_endurance_performance - https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7740244/ - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/236590070_Detraining - https://www.jsams.org/article/S1440-2440(05)80042-8/pdf - https://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00007256-200030030-00001 - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/305755326_Effects_of_long-term_training_cessation_in_young_top-level_road_cyclists - https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10966148/ - https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10999420/ - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1724429/ - https://www.trainerroad.com/blog/minimum-effective-dose-how-much-should-you-train-to-get-faster/ - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/12455341_Maximal_lactate-steady-state_independent_of_performance - https://www.trainerroad.com/app/cycling/workouts/363858-dardanelles-2 - https://journals.physiology.org/doi/abs/10.1152/japplphysiol.00636.2019 - https://agsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jgs.13365 - https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31027172/ - https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/The-effect-of-aging-on-skeletal-muscle-recovery-for-Fell-Williams/b560ea60c375592daa8e4a7ee0e9a7f8bd7417fc - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303900206_The_Effect_of_Higher_Than_Recommended_Protein_Feedings_Post-Exercise_on_Recovery_Following_Downhill_Running_in_Masters_Triathletes - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/287661146_Comparison_of_Post-Exercise_Nutrition_Knowledge_and_Post-Exercise_Carbohydrate_and_Protein_Intake_Between_Australian_Masters_and_Younger_Triathletes - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/5426282_Altered_perception_and_report_of_fatigue_and_recovery_in_veteran_athletes ------------------------------------------------------------------ STAY IN TOUCH Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TrainerRd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/trainerroad/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TrainerRoad Strava Club: https://www.strava.com/clubs/trainerroad
2 hr 16 min
Zwiftcast
Zwiftcast
Simon Schofield
Ep 93: Peak Zwift, Coco is Cara! Zwift Power + all the Zwifty chat
A new episode for a New Year - and 2021 has dawned with, as usual, lots of Zwift news and developments for the Zwiftcasters to discuss.The trio start off with an exploration of the possible reasons why Simon’s very favourite pacer bot may have had an identity change. Coco is now Cara! But why? Simon has a theory. The podcasters move on to discuss the big new Peak Zwift - with more than 46,000 users on the platform concurrently the growth of Zwift over the past year can now be quantified, using this public metric. Up from a mere 16,000 concurrent users at the same point last year, Simon, Shane and Zwift celebrate the achievement whilst also exploring what it all means. Just in time for the Tour de Zwift’s six remaining stages, the game’s developers think they may have found a possible bug which could explain why some users (previously described by the chaps as “potato-owners”) have hit problems riding big events. Are potatoes off the hook? The Zwiftcasters chime in. A high profile departure from Zwift of a respected event organiser seems to have focussed some attention on the event management system - is a new hire at Zwift, combined with the drama of the departure, an answer to some of the gripes Event Organisers have? And Zwift Power has been having a tough time recently - Glen Knight, one half of the service’s inventors tries to shed light on what may be happening. Plus all the usual other Zwift news and chat! We hope you enjoy listening.
1 hr 25 min
Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running
Run to the Top Podcast | The Ultimate Guide to Running
RunnersConnect : Running Coaching Community
Nathan Martin is Breaking Records and Stereotypes
Nathan Martin just broke a 41-year-old record at the Marathon Project held this past December. He finished in 2:11:05, making him the fastest US born Black marathoner of all time. He placed ninth, beating out Olympians and professionals with far deeper pedigrees. In addition to being a super-fast runner, Nathan is also on a mission to give back and inspire others, especially the kids he coaches. Instead of leaving his high school coaching job to turn pro and join an elite training team, he decided to stay and continue training with his college coach Dante Ottolini at Spring Arbor University. In this episode, Nathan discusses how he first started running, the tragic deaths of both of his parents, and his unlikely path to record-breaking running success. He also shares his thoughts on why there are comparatively few American born Black runners in long distance running and how he sees that changing in the future. Lastly, he talks about his next goal which involves hopefully setting a huge PR! Nathan Martin was born in Chicago Heights, Illinois and raised in Three Rivers, Michigan. He started running Cross Country in Middle School after doing well in the gym class fitness test. He quickly discovered he had talent, and with the encouragement of others, kept with it. He was able to excel at the high school level, breaking three different school records and finishing runner-up at the MHSAA D2 state finals in the mile. At Spring Arbor University, Nathan majored in Recreation and Leisure Management with a minor in Computer Science. As a freshman, he came in underdeveloped as far as training goes. However, after a couple of years of hard work, his potential started to show. By the end of senior year, he became a National Champion in three different events and set the NAIA Marathon record. Post college Nathan continued pursuing running to see how far his talents could take him, which ultimately led to an incredible opportunity to coach at the MHSAA D1 level, as well as substitute teaching in Jackson County. At first it was just a way to keep a flexible schedule, but he quickly fell in love with it and his and his coach’s new focus became how to make everything work together, which inspired them to create the Great Lakes Running Club. Through this process, Nathan was still making huge gains in running, most notably the 2019 20k Championships where he finished runner up, and now, his finish at the 2020 Marathon Project where he finished 9th with a 2:11:05 putting him 49th on the all-time US Marathoner list and breaking a 41-year-old record set by Herman Atkins, making Nathan the fastest US Born Black Marathoner. Questions Nathan is asked: 3:20 You made history at the Marathon Project on December 20th, by becoming the fastest US born Black man to run a marathon in 2:11:05, breaking a more than 40-year-old record. What does that feel like and did you even know about the record before the race? 4:16 Can you give us a recap of the race in Arizona, how it went, what your strategy was, all the details? 5:36 There’s two sets of pace groups in that race, the 2:09 group and the 2:11 group. What made you not want to go ahead with the 2:09 group? 7:35 Easing up on your pace a little instead of staying with the 2:09 group left you out in no-man’s land for a little while, didn’t it? 8:22 You ended up in ninth place, which is obviously very impressive on such a fast course where so many guys went 2:09, so congratulations for that. It must have felt amazing to have such a PR and to crack the top 10. 9:28 I’d love to hear a little bit more about your back story. How did you first get into running and did you like it immediately? 11:15 You ran through high school and you ran in college, and you worked with a coach that certainly changed your life. Can you tell us a little bit about your coach and that relationship? 12:31 Dante Ottolini is still your coach today, right? 12:36 During college you lost your parents to cancer. How did running help you get through those hard times? 14:32 It sounds like your team really had your back when you lost your parents. That’s amazing. 15:03 After college, you could have left Michigan to be a pro or train somewhere else, but you stayed and became a substitute teacher and high school coach. Why did you make that decision? What does coaching bring to your life? 16:36 It sounds like you get more out of coaching your athletes than they get from you. 16:50 Do you think you would ever consider turning pro? 19:21 Have you considered staying in Michigan and maybe joining Hansons-Brooks? 19:59 One thing that I wanted to ask you is do you have any insight as to why more Black Americans aren't involved in distance running? Black Americans dominate track and field but are not as well represented in the longer distances. Do you have any thoughts of why this is? 21:41 Why didn’t you switch to basketball or football or something like that? 22:28 As a coach, how do you keep kids motivated when the other sports come calling? 23:12 Obviously running, at least in the United States, is not as glamorous as the NFL or the NBA, so I think this is an issue all across the country no matter what race you’re from, so how do we get more people interested in running? And I don’t know the answer. I don’t know if you have any insight on that. 24:02 What was the reaction when you came home from Arizona with your athletes, people in town, your coach? What did they say to you? 24:58 What are you training for now? What’s coming up next? 25:38 The Olympics 10k standard is 28 minutes so that would be a big PR for you. What’s your PR right now? 26:16 What are some of the specific things that you would do to run the 10k in 28 minutes, or is that still a mystery? 27:01 Are you basically the fastest guy in town or do you have some good training partners that can help you out? Questions I ask everyone: 27:58 If you could go back and talk to yourself when you started running, what advice would you give? 28:49 What is the greatest gift running has given you? 29:34 Where can listeners connect with you? Quotes by Nathan: “So I’m like, You know what? Hey, we need to be smart about this race. We’re looking to hit a huge PR. If we can stay with this 2:09 group, we’re going to do it but I need to protect myself and make sure I have a good day and don’t let others affect that.” “Always, whatever I’m doing, I want to make sure that I’m connecting with people and finding ways to impact them. So if I did leave to a training group, it’d have to be more than just faster or to get to the Olympics type thing.” “Most people enjoy hearing what they’re able to do and that’s definitely what I would try and make sure I do with my athletes.” “You need people you can look towards. In one sense, I broke a record. Great for me. But in a whole ‘nother sense, it allows somebody to see somebody who’s achieved something and say, ‘You know what, that’s what I want to achieve. I think I can do that.’ And then they carve a path to find a way.” Take a Listen on Your Next Run Want more awesome interviews and advice? Subscribe to our iTunes channel Mentioned in this podcast: Runners Connect Winner's Circle Facebook Community RunnersConnect Facebook page RunnersConnect Focus Classes email Coach Claire Use Promo Code RTTT for 20% off Sweaty Betty at www.sweatybetty.com/RTTT Follow Nathan on: Instagram Nathan Martin’s Olympic Trials Countdown | Facebook We really hope you’ve enjoyed this episode of Run to the Top. The best way you can show your support of the show is to share this podcast with your family and friends and share it on your Facebook, Twitter, or any other social media channel you use. The more people who know about the podcast and download the episodes, the more I can reach out to and get top running influencers, to bring them on and share their advice, which hopefully makes the sho…
34 min
Fast Talk
Fast Talk
Fast Talk Labs
146: Cardiovascular Drift, with Dr. Ed Coyle
If you’ve listened to Fast Talk for a while, you’ve likely heard us mention “cardiac drift” or “decoupling” in several episodes. It's a favorite topic of Coach Connor's. The terms refer to cardiovascular drift, which is a "drifting" in heart rate and stroke volume over time. On the bike, we measure it by looking at a rise in heart rate relative to power. Many causes have been theorized including dehydration, muscle damage, cutaneous blood flow, and mitochondrial efficiency.     We’re very excited to have as our featured guest today Dr. Ed Coyle, the University of Texas exercise physiology researcher who published the definitive articles on cardiovascular drift in the 1990s. In that research, Coyle, who is also the director of the Human Performance Laboratory at the university, and his colleagues demonstrated that even when hydration is maintained, CV drift can be experienced. This increase in heart rate reduces the time the heart has to fill with blood, and this is the main reason for a drop in stroke volume, or the amount of blood pushed out by the heart with each beat.    The drop in stroke volume is a hallmark of CV drift, and historically it has been attributed to blood pooling in the skin and less blood returning to the heart. Coyle and his team found no evidence that blood flow to skin is increased or that venous return is compromised.    In a practical sense, when a person becomes dehydrated during prolonged exercise, they also get hotter and experience a greater increase in heart rate and a lower cardiac output and circulation of blood: CV drift. The exercise becomes very hard when it should not be hard at all. Competitive cyclists interpret this to mean they are getting a “better workout” because it’s more stressful. It certainly is more stressful, but that type of cardiovascular drift is a negative stress. It does more harm than good.    We’ll dive into all of this and much more today on Fast Talk, as we hear from Dr. Coyle and a host of other incredible guests who share their thoughts on cardiovascular drift.  Now, let's make you fast!    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 10 min
The Strength Running Podcast
The Strength Running Podcast
Jason Fitzgerald
174. Sprint and Speed Development for Endurance Runners with Coach Ryan Banta
Ryan Banta is a coach with more than 19 years of experience and the author of the Sprinter’s Compendium. At the high school level, Ryan has produced 135 All-State medalists, including 10 state champions and 15 runners-up. His teams have won 12 district championships and 5 top five state finishes in the last nine seasons. He has been elected Missouri Track and Cross Country Coaches Association (MTCCCA) president and served on the Missouri State High School Activities Association (MSHSAA) advisory board. In this podcast, we discuss: * Prevention of sprinting-related injuries * Common training errors in pursuit of speed * Mechanics of maximum velocity running * The speed development differences between teenagers and adults In the spirit of this year's Take Action theme, we leave off with a number of actionable steps that any runner can take to improve their speed. Show Links & Resources: * Connect with Ryan on Twitter * Check out his videos on YouTube * Books mentioned by Ryan * Supertraining by Yuri Verkhoshansky * Becoming a Supple Leopard by Kelly Starrett Thank You PWURE! Our newest sponsor is PWURE; learn more about them at pwure.com. They’re offering 20% off your first month with code "nextlevel" at checkout. Using either your Strava data or an online consultation, they create pre-run and post-run personalized shakes using organic ingredients. They’re the first company to use your fitness data to craft on-demand nutrition - I think the potential of this is awesome and it reminds me of the testing and effort that goes into elite marathoners and their fueling. PWURE has been testing their products with pro runners and the promise here is that they can deliver optimized, better ratios of carbohydrate to protein so you can perform better and recover faster. You get a post-workout dose recommendation so everything they make and recommend is unique to you. All of their formulas can be made vegan, there are four flavors to choose from, and you can even add vitamins. 82% of users saw performance and recovery improvement after one month and 86% would recommend it to a friend. See all PWURE have to offer and don’t forget that code nextlevel will save you 20% on your first month.
57 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu