Encore: Why boredom is surprisingly interesting, with Erin Westgate, PhD
Play • 41 min

We’re taking a holiday break, so we’re revisiting one of our favorite episodes from this past year. Back in the spring we talked to University of Florida psychologist Erin Westgate about the surprisingly fascinating topic of boredom. What is boredom? Is it always bad to be bored? What can we do to infuse even boring times with meaning? 

Links Erin Westgate, PhD Music "Emotional Piano" by tictac9 via freesound.org.

 

Psychologists Off The Clock
Psychologists Off The Clock
Diana Hill, Debbie Sorensen, Yael Schonbrun & Jill Stoddard
186. Set Boundaries Find Peace with Nedra Tawwab
Setting healthy boundaries can be challenging, whether it is with someone you love or someone you dislike. Sticking with your boundaries once you set them, is also difficult. Relationship expert Nedra Tawwab, author of Set Boundaries, Find Peace, has the insight and tools you need to set boundaries so that you can thrive. In this episode, Diana and Nedra discuss strategies to overcome barriers to boundary setting so that you can set boundaries and find peace today! Listen and Learn: Diana and Jill’s take on the importance of boundary setting Nedra’s expert definition of boundaries and explanation of how they impact mental healthThe science behind how setting healthy boundaries can provide peace and freedom from anxietyPractical advice on how to set boundaries with toxic individuals, narcissists, your parents, your in-laws, your children, and yourself!Barriers that might be affecting your ability to set a healthy boundaryWhat to do with the feeling of guilt when it shows up during the boundary-setting processNedra’s practical advice on how to be a clear communicator and set effective boundaries in particularly toxic dynamicsThe differences between a soft boundary and a rigid boundary (and when to be flexible with them!)What clear boundaries sound likeThe subtle differences between assertiveness, aggressiveness, and passivityNedra’s take on setting ultimatums (and why they aren’t always a bad thing)Why it’s important to set boundaries with your kids and how to teach them to set their own Nedra’s personal experience with boundaries and how setting them has changed her life Resources: Nedra’s book, Set Boundaries, Find Peace: A Guide to Reclaiming Yourself Nedra’s website which has TONS of FREE resources including worksheets, a relationship quiz, a boundaries quiz, and Nedra's book recommendationsCheck out co-host Diana’s workshop, An Introduction to ACT: Growing Psychological Flexibility through Acceptance, Caring, and Tiny Daily Practices on February 28th from 2pm to 5pm Pacific Standard Time  About Nedra Tawwab: NEDRA GLOVER TAWWAB, a licensed therapist and sought-after relationship expert, has practiced relationship therapy for twelve years and is the founder and owner of the group therapy practice Kaleidoscope Counseling. She has been recently featured in The New York Times, The Guardian, Psychology Today, Self, and Vice, and has appeared on numerous podcasts, including Don't Keep Your Day Job, Do the Thing, and Therapy for Black Girls. Tawwab runs a popular Instagram account where she shares practices, tools, and reflections for mental health and hosts weekly Q&As about boundaries and relationships. She lives in Charlotte, North Carolina, with her family. Connect with Nedra Tawwab on Instagram @nedratawwab. Find out more about her book, here.  Related Episodes: Episode 98. Narcissism with Dr. Avigail Lev and Dr. Robyn Walser Episode 174. How to Work and Parent Mindfully with Lori Mihalich-LevinEpisode 168. Everyday Conversations: How Conversational Style Impacts Relationships with Deborah TannenEpisode 134. What to do When Work, Parenting, and Partnership Collide During Quarantine
54 min
The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman
The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman
Scott Barry Kaufman
Sam Harris || Free Will (Part 1)
Today it’s great to have Sam Harris on the podcast. Sam is the author of five New York Times best sellers, including The End of Faith, Letter to a Christian Nation, The Moral Landscape, Free Will, Lying, and Waking Up. The End of Faith won the 2005 PEN Award for Nonfiction. His writing and public lectures cover a wide range of topics—neuroscience, moral philosophy,religion, meditation practice, human violence, rationality—but generally focus on how a growing understanding of ourselves and the world is changing our sense of how we should live. He also hosts the Making Sense Podcast, which was selected by Apple as one of the “iTunes Best” and has won a Webby Award for best podcast in the Science & Education category. Topics [1:57] Sam’s reflections on his childhood [7:18] Sam’s interest in martial arts [8:04] Sam’s experience with MDMA [12:09] How Sam ended up on the Dalai Lama’s security detail [16:39] Sam’s experience with meditation teacher Sayadaw U Pandita [23:12] Dualistic vs Nondualistic mindfulness [24:34] Sam’s experience with Dzogchen meditation [28:27] Sam’s dream about Dilgo Khyentse [34:15] Sam’s experience with fiction writing [37:50] Scott questions Sam’s position on free will [41:33] Sam’s disagreement with Daniel Dennett [42:41] Sam’s take on free will and human interaction [46:38] Why Sam thinks we’re getting “free will” wrong --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-psychology-podcast/support
59 min
Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone
Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone
Ginger Campbell, MD
BS 181 Sir Simon Baron-Cohen
This month's episode of Brain Science features Sir Simon Baron-Cohen, one of the world's leading researchers on the neuroscience of autism. We discuss his latest book "The Pattern Seekers: How Autism Drives Human Invention." This book reminds us that many different kinds of science can enrich our lives and our understanding of what it means to be human. Sir Baron-Cohen explores the overlap between the human ability to invent and experiment and the condition that is currently called autism. Autism is often seen as a deficit in social cognition or empathy, but Baron-Cohen shows convincingly that there is a significant overlap between autism and what he calls extreme systemizing. Because systemizing or pattern recognition drives the human ability to constantly invent new technologies, it appears to compliment social skills such as empathy. Sir Baron-Cohen share the evidence that people tend to be stronger in one area or the other. Most importantly, he emphasizes that autism is not necessarily a disabling condition because those with extremely strong pattern recognition skills can make many valuable contributions. Links and References: * The Pattern Seekers: How Autism Drives Human Invention by Simon Baron-Cohen * Greenberg DM, Warrier V, Allison C, Baron-Cohen S. Testing the Empathizing-Systemizing theory of sex differences and the Extreme Male Brain theory of autism in half a million people. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 Nov 27;115(48):12152-12157. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1811032115. Epub 2018 Nov 12. PMID: 30420503; PMCID: PMC6275492. * Sir Simon Baron-Cohen, PhD. University of Cambridge (UK) * Please visit http://brainsciencepodcast.com for additonal references and episode transcripts. Bonus Content: * Listen to BS 99 with Temple Grandin via the free Brain Science mobile app. Download the app from your favorite App Store. Please Visit Our Sponsors: * TextExpander at https://textexpander.com/podcast Announcements: * _Brain Science_ comes out on 4th Friday each month. * Support Brain Science by buying Are You Sure? The Unconscious Origins of Certainty by Virginia "Ginger" Campbell, MD. (Autographed copies are available) * Learn more ways to support Brain Science at http://brainsciencepodcast.com/donations * Sign up for the free Brain Science Newsletter to get show notes automatically every month. You can also text brainscience to 55444 to sign up. * Check out the free Brain Science Mobile app for iOS, Android, and Windows. (It's a great way to get both new episodes and premium content.) * Send email to brainsciencepodcast@gmail.com or post voice feedback at http://speakpipe.com/docartemis. * Please check out Dr. Campbell's other podcasts: Books and Ideas and Graying Rainbows where ever you get your favorite audio. Connect on Social Media: * Twitter: @_docartemis_ * Facebook page: _http://www.facebook.com/brainsciencepodcast_ Contact Dr. Campbell: * Email: brainsciencepodcast@gmail.com * Voicemail: _http://speakpipe.com/docartemis_
46 min
Therapy in a Nutshell
Therapy in a Nutshell
tinpodcast
The SIFT technique for Emotion Processing: Dr. Daniel Siegel The Whole Brain Child
Emotion processing is when you work through emotions, and in this technique for anxiety and other strong emotions, we cover the SIFT technique. the SIFT technique was developed by Dr. Dan Siegal and is a helpful technique for coping with anxiety and stress and other sensations and emotions. Thanks BetterHelp for sponsoring the video: BetterHelp- Professional, Affordable Online Counseling starting at around $65 a week https://www.betterhelp.com/therapyina...​ Learn more in one of my in-depth mental health courses: https://therapyinanutshell.teachable....​ Support my mission on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/therapyinanut...​ Sign up for my newsletter: https://www.therapynutshell.com​ Check out my favorite self-help books: https://kit.co/TherapyinaNutshell/bes...​ ​Therapy in a Nutshell, and the information provided by Emma McAdam, is solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and is not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health. If you are in crisis please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at: https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/​ or 1-800-273-TALK (8255), or your local emergency services. Copyright Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC ---- Music licensed from www.Bensound.com or Artlist.io Images from Freepik.com (premium license), Pixabay, or Wikimedia commons
5 min
Stoic Coffee Break
Stoic Coffee Break
Erick Cloward
175 - Circumstances and Choices
One of the core tenants of Stoicism is understanding the things we control and the things we cannot control. Today I want to discuss this a bit more in depth. _“Some things are within our power, while others are not. Within our power are opinion, motivation, desire, aversion, and, in a word, whatever is of our own doing; not within our power are our body, our property, reputation, office, and, in a word, whatever is not of our own doing.”_ _— Epictetus_ Circumstances and Externals First, I want to focus on the things that we don’t have control over. Our property is anything that we own. We don’t control what happens to our things. An earthquake, fire, or flood could ruin our home. Someone could crash into our car. Our computer or jewelry or money could be stolen. Our reputation, or namely, what other people think of us. This is hard because we want to be liked by other people, and to some extent are driven by what others think of us. But simply put, we have absolutely no control over what other people think of us. As an aside to this, since we cannot control what other people think of us, this also means that we cannot control other people. Since other people’s moods and actions are driven by how they think, and we cannot control what they think, we cannot control other people. Our office, or the position in life. This includes things like the circumstances of out birth. For example, we don’t control if we were born white or Black, Finnish or Filipino. We can’t control the nation that we are born in. We can’t control if we are born into a wealthy family. These are all things that are just pure luck. This also includes aspects of our career or politic power. We can choose our career, but how successful we are is not up to us. We can work hard and make the best choices we can, but we often get promoted at work because of the choices of other people. We may choose to run for political office but we get elected to office because other people vote for us. Probably the most surprising thing for many on the list of things that we don’t control is our body. You might think, well, I do have control over my body. Can you stop your body from breaking down? Can you stop simply make an illness stop? No, you can’t. Thinking Now that we clarified what things outside of our control, let’s dive into what we do have control over. Epictetus tells us we control how and what we think. Let’s take each of the things that he mentions and dissect it. Opinions are our judgments about people and events. These are our beliefs about the world. These are formed by our experience, our knowledge, what other people have told us, and our own biases and superstitions. These are the things that we think of as “true”, and in a sense, they are true for us. Motivations are the reasons and meanings that we give to things, or why we think things happen the way they do. When we make assumptions about why people do things, we are ascribing motivations to them. This is of course just our opinion about why we think they do something. Desires are things we want, such as material things, career, personal pursuits and growth. These our own motivations. This is the “why” behind the things that we do. Aversions are things we avoid, dislike, and may even hate. This is the “why” or the motivation behind the things we avoid or will not do. These things that Epictetus has laid out are the things that influence our thinking. They are integral to our complete thought process. Each of these aspects is so important to understand because how we think is the key to the choices that we make, and the actions we take. Choices So when it comes down to it, our thoughts and choices are the only things that we actually have control over. Everything else is outside of our control. Everything. When you look at everything as a circumstance or a choice, it becomes much easier to see what our options are in any situation. When we clearly understand what our options, it is easier to make a choice, and those choices lead to actions, which lead to the results we get. We many not have many options. We may not like our options. They may completely suck. But the better we get at clearly recognizing our options, the more willing we are to make choices. The more choices we make, the better we get at making better choices. Shifting to this way of thinking is not easy. From my experience, most of us go through life thinking that we have a lot more control over what happens to us. When we recognize that we have very little control over what happens to us in life, it can be downright scary, or it can be downright liberating. The less we have control over, the more we can focus on the things that we do have control over. We can focus on understanding how we think. We can examine our opinions. We can see if our beliefs about things are holding us back or influencing us in a way that is detrimental. We can stop wasting energy on things we don’t control. The most important thing that we can do each day is to practice seeing what our options are and making choices. _“If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.”_ _— Neil Peart (Drummer and lyricists of Rush)_ It’s okay to decide not to make a choice. Sometimes we don’t have enough information, or we feel overwhelmed by too much information. Sometimes is not a choice that is worth our time. Steve Jobs and Barack Obama both simplified their wardrobes so that they did not have to spend time make choices they felt were unimportant. You can do the same. Choosing to not make a choice, or to delay a choice, is still making a choice. But by making it intentional, you are exerting control over your life. Influence Many of the things we cannot control, we may think that we have influence over. But I want to caution about this way of thinking. I think we should view things as either circumstances OR as things we can control. Why is it important to get rid of this grey area? Because believing we have influence over something is a messy area that can lead to very poor choices. “Influencing” is not an action, it is just a perception. You can’t choose to influence someone or a situation. However, you can make a choice, take an action, and the result of that action may or may not influence someone or influence an outcome. Influence is also something difficult, if not impossible, to measure. When you think that you have influence over something, you think that you have some semblance of control over it. By keeping things clearly in the categories of things you do have control over, and things you do not have control over, you are able to think more clearly, and you don’t fall victim to hubris. Practice So how do we become better at seeing our options and making choices? I plan on making an episode about how to make better choices, so that I can give it the focus that needs. But in the meantime, taking some time each day to write down your options when it comes a decision is a good place to start. You can also examine the choices you make each day and eliminate the ones that are not important. Clearly seeing things we do and don’t have control over is a skill that can impact every aspect of our lives. It can help lower our stress and help us make better and faster decisions. It can save us energy by focusing on the important things in our lives and letting go of the rest.
11 min
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