Simply Tax
Simply Tax
Jan 21, 2021
New Year, New Tax Changes #117
Play • 45 min

Tax headlines are swirling after several tax-related developments following the enactment of the 2021 Consolidated Appropriations Act on December 27, 2020. Tune in as host Damien Martin cuts through the static of these significant changes with returning guests Jesse Palmer and Yelena Bosovik. Here’s what’s covered:

  • Expanded and extended employee retention credit (ERC)
    • What is the ERC? [01:55]
    • What changed? [05:17]
    • How do you claim the ERC retroactively for 2020? [09:54]
  • Extended credits under the Families First Coronavirus Relief Act [10:50]
    • Paid sick leave vs expanded family leave [12:32]
    • Importance of documentation [13:45]
  • Important considerations for the ERC [15:45]
  • Business meal deduction changes [22:00]
  • Charitable provisions for individuals [25:52]
  • Deferral of the employee’s portion of Social Security tax [27:26]
  • Other employment benefit changes [31:15]
  • Extender provisions [35:12]
  • Closing remarks [42:30]

Learn more about our guests and get additional resources here.

GET MORE “SIMPLY TAX”

We’re excited to also provide video content to strengthen your tax mind! Check it out on our YouTube channel.

A complete archive of our episodes is available on our website and YouTube playlist.

We’d love to hear from you! Email feedback and questions to SimplyTax@bkd.com.

Connect with Damien on social media!

LinkedIn | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Growing Your Firm | Strategies for Accountants, CPA's, Bookkeepers , and Tax Professionals
Growing Your Firm | Strategies for Accountants, CPA's, Bookkeepers , and Tax Professionals
Jetpack Workflow
The Progressive Accountant’s Guide to Building Accounting Relationships
Recognized as one of the Top 50 Women in Accounting, Twyla Verhelst is known for leading the charge when it comes to advocacy, change, and community in her industry and beyond. She’s an experienced CPA and tech entrepreneur with a passion for helping others find and leverage their confidence. Twyla’s fascination with finances began when she was only nine years old, manning the cash register in her parents’ small business. After studying accounting and business management, she worked as an accountant, controller, and recruiter before moving on to co-found two successful companies: Twenty Eighty, an advisory accounting firm, and Helm, a cash flow forecasting app. She also started Empowering Tana, a non-profit benefiting girls and women with autism, and created the Video Per Day Experiment, a 30-day challenge designed to help professionals break out of their comfort zone and discover their voice. If that wasn’t enough, in her spare time she’s also an ultramarathon runner. Now Twyla is bringing her vast energy and expertise to FreshBooks, a market leader in cloud-based accounting solutions for small businesses. As leader of FreshBooks Accounting Professionals Program, she’s working to empower forward-thinking accounting pros with the tools they need to thrive, as well as helping them discover their most valuable asset — their authentic self.
36 min
Money! with Stacy Johnson
Money! with Stacy Johnson
MoneyTalksNews.com
The Pros and Cons of Working in Retirement feat. Paula Pant
Not long ago, the phrase "working in retirement" was an oxymoron, much like "bittersweet," "act naturally" or "hot water heater." After all, if you're working, you're by definition not retired. But that was then. These days, working at least part-time while retired is increasingly common. According to one recent survey quoted in Forbes, 27% of pre-retirees said they planned to work part-time in retirement and among retirees, 19% are working part-time. Why so much working during retirement? More likely than not, because of money. As we explained in articles like 8 Reasons Your Parents Had an Easier Retirement Than You Will, pensions are rapidly disappearing, replaced by much less reliable accounts like IRAs and 401(k)s.  And as retiree income is falling, costs are rising. On the plus side, however, while more retirees may be forced back into the workplace to make ends meet, there are more ways than ever to bring in a bit of extra bacon. In short, in my parent's generation, retirement meant not working at all. But for us Boomers, retirement is morphing into something different. It's not about doing nothing. It's about being productive and making money, but by doing what you want to do, rather than what you have to do. What kind of work will today's (or tomorrow's) retiree look forward to doing? Will it be easy to find pleasant, lucrative work? Should we start long before we retire? In this week's "Money" podcast, we're going to find answers to these questions, as well as many more. Our guest is author and super-popular podcaster Paula Pant from Afford Anything. Smart, funny and knowledgeable, you'll have a good time listening to her. Want more information? Check out these resources: 7 Tips for Getting a Great Part-Time Job in Retirement 10 Stats About Working in Retirement This Job Board Specializes in Remote Work and Flexible Gigs 5 Reasons You Should Work for as Long as You Live 15 Jobs for Retirees That Can Be Done From Home 8 Signs That It's Time for You to Unretire AARP: Job Search Resources for 50+ Subscribe to the Money Talks News newsletter Take our The Only Retirement Guide You'll Ever Need course Take our Money Made Simple course Hosts: MoneyTalksNews MirandaMarquit.com Ask us a question Become a member: https://www.moneytalksnews.com/members/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
28 min
CFO THOUGHT LEADER
CFO THOUGHT LEADER
Jack Sweeney Speaks to CFOs About Driving Change | Middle Market Media, LLC
677: Engaging Minds at Work | Michael Pickrum, CFO, ExecOnline
When Michael Pickrum tells us about ExecOnline, the company that he joined as CFO back in 2019, he wants us to know that the education technology firm is aligned with his goals both professionally and personally. When it comes to the professional side of things, Pickrum says, ExecOnline in certain ways is a media company. “You’re taking some IP and figuring out how to distribute and monetize it,” comments Pickrum, while boiling down the somewhat complex approach that ExecOnline uses to repackage the curricula of top business schools and universities to better serve the specific people development needs of a variety of corporate clients. Still, Pickrum’s shorthand description is intended not to spotlight the facets of ExecOnline’s business model but instead to draw our attention to its similarities with his past media industry experience—such as his 17 years with BET Networks, where he occupied the CFO office for 9 of them. As for the personal side of things, Pickrum says that he is a “big believer” when it comes to the transformative power of education. “I went to public schools growing up—I was very fortunate to go to a great university, and it changed my life,” remarks Pickrum, who adds that ExecOnline packages the academic IP not with aspiring college students in mind but with an eye toward first-time managers as well as more senior business leaders. According to Pickrum, part of the added value that ExecOnline offers corporate clients derives from providing the IP in a more relevant and efficient way. “Most of our programs are 1 week, 3 weeks, or 6ix weeks,” explains Pickrum, who says that at times the material being covered can be applied to a specific project that the managers are undertaking within their company. “It’s just a great marriage between the business school’s IP, professors, and resources, and our platform and ability to engage people where they are, which is at work.” –Jack Sweeney * Leave rating & review * Signup for our Newsletter GET MORE: Order now The CFO Yearbook, 2021 uf1Uaz9iI5wYUzzsFtwd
43 min
The Power Of Zero Show
The Power Of Zero Show
David McKnight
"From Forever Taxed to Never Taxed": My Interview with Ed Slott (Part 1)
Ed Slott has a new book coming out called The New Retirement Savings Time Bomb. It’s the updated version of the original book written 20 years ago where the time bomb was the tax building up in your IRA account. If you didn’t know how to plan, you could be hit twice and lose up to 80% and 90%. Some of the Estate taxes have gone away since then, but there are other new threats to your retirement savings than ever before. Congress always needs money, and they will always go for the lowest hanging fruit, which is your retirement savings. It’s like a deal with the devil, getting those deductions on the front end with the hope that you will be in a lower tax bracket. This assumption is where the danger lies. The Secure Act has ironically made your retirement savings less secure. The biggest threat is the elimination of the stretch IRA and the estate implications. Every plan needs to be reviewed and revised, maybe scrapped altogether for different thinking entirely. Congress needs money, which means tax rates are going to go up and that people will have less money in retirement. What is driving the need for these huge infusions of cash? Deficits and debts are the issue. The government has been recklessly spending for decades, and now it’s only increased with the effects of Covid-19. When most people think of compound interest, they think of how Albert Einstein is the 8th wonder of the world. It’s great when it’s working for you, but awful when compounding is working against you. Compounding debt is the real issue. The math doesn’t discriminate. The math bears it out that we will never see tax rates as low as they are today. We need a more stable and secure plan for the future. The history of tax rates shows that we could return to where rates were as high as 90% for the top tax brackets. You may only have one more year to take advantage of these historically low tax rates. People have to realize that they are in control of their tax rates. Taking advantage of the current low tax rates is the best tax planning you can do. Always pay taxes when the rates are the lowest. That may mean paying some taxes now, but you have to remember that taxes are a bill that won’t go away. The concern about losing out on compounding interest when converting to a Roth IRA is a myth. If you are truly comparing apples to apples, there is no loss when using the same rates of return and taxes, but if rates go up, then everything changes. When rates go up, everything tax-free becomes more valuable. When you have money in your IRA, it is accruing to the benefit of the IRS. When you convert now, you are claiming your portion of the money, as well as the future interest. Taxes have to be paid for. It’s not if, it’s when. Why not pay them while they are on sale? Even in the worst case scenario, by converting now you lock in a zero percent tax rate for the rest of your life, which is not a bad consolation prize. After the Secure Act, using a trust to protect your money after death is no longer viable. Regardless of what happens with tax rates, this is going to become a huge burden for a number of people, and this makes a permanent life insurance policy even more attractive. People don’t care about the vehicle. They want the results. They want low taxes, larger inheritance, and post death control, and a permanent life insurance plan that fits the bill. Mentioned in this Episode: The New Retirement Savings Time Bomb by Ed Slott can be pre-ordered on Amazon here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07TSZSSY5/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i0
28 min
Student Loan Planner
Student Loan Planner
Travis Hornsby
The Perfect Income for Peak Happiness as a Student Loan Borrower
Do you wonder if you made the right decision to go into the field you did? After investing years of time and effort, along with hundreds of thousands of dollars in student loan debt, do you ask yourself “is the grass greener on the other side?” Join me as I take a deep dive into what peak happiness might look like, how to deal with job regret and the perfect income to achieve maximum happiness as a student loan borrower. In today’s episode, you'll find out: * What is “the grass is greener syndrome” * Pros and cons of physician mortgage (or doctor mortgage) loans * How to pay down your student loan using gains from stock market training * Whether to double-dip on the federal poverty line deduction when filing taxes separately * The perfect income you need to earn to reach peak happiness * Why your level of engagement at work is a huge factor in attaining your perfect income * How to calculate your perfect income depending on your current student debt * How to deal with job regret * Ways to overcome unhappiness with your profession Like the show? There are several ways you can help! * Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or Google Podcasts * Leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts * Follow on Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn Feeling helpless when it comes to your student loans? * Try our free student loan calculator * Check out our refinancing bonuses we negotiated * Book your custom student loan plan
59 min
Financial Decoder
Financial Decoder
Charles Schwab
Are You Rationalizing an Investing Mistake?
If you save money and invest it consistently, your path toward meeting your goals may seem simple. But most investors quickly discover that there are hurdles in the way—including our own brains. There are many cognitive and emotional biases that can trap us, and investors sometimes rationalize falling prey to these biases in familiar ways. In this episode, Mark is joined by Brad Bartick, branch manager of the downtown Denver Schwab branch, and financial consultant Joanna Heckman to discuss four different biases that investors have faced recently and what they sound like in action. Subscribe to _Financial Decoder_ for free on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen. _Financial Decoder_ is an original podcast from Charles Schwab. If you enjoy the show, please leave a ★★★★★ rating or review on Apple Podcasts. Important Disclosures: Investors should consider carefully information contained in the prospectus or, if available, the summary prospectus, including investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses. Please read it carefully before investing. The information provided here is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered an individualized recommendation or personalized investment advice. The investment strategies mentioned here may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review an investment strategy for his or her own particular situation before making any investment decision. All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market conditions. Data contained herein from third-party providers is obtained from what are considered reliable sources. However, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed. Supporting documentation for any claims or statistical information is available upon request. Examples provided are for illustrative purposes only and not intended to be reflective of results you can expect to achieve. Investing involves risk including loss of principal. Indexes are unmanaged, do not incur management fees, costs and expenses and cannot be invested in directly. For more information on indexes please see www.schwab.com/indexdefinitions. Past performance is no guarantee of future results and the opinions presented cannot be viewed as an indicator of future performance. This information does not constitute and is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax, legal, or investment planning advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, Schwab recommends consultation with a qualified tax advisor, CPA, financial planner, or investment manager. Apple Podcasts and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Google Podcasts and the Google Podcasts logo are trademarks of Google LLC. Spotify and the Spotify logo are registered trademarks of Spotify AB.Important Disclosures: The information provided here is for general informational purposes only and should not be considered an individualized recommendation or personalized investment advice. The investment strategies mentioned here may not be suitable for everyone. Each investor needs to review an investment strategy for his or her own particular situation before making any investment decision. All expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market conditions. Data contained herein from third-party providers is obtained from what are considered reliable sources. However, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed. Supporting documentation for any claims or statistical information is available upon request. Examples provided are for illustrative purposes only and not intended to be reflective of results you can expect to achieve. Investing involves risk including loss of principal. Indexes are unmanaged, do not incur management fees, costs and expenses and cannot be invested in directly. For more information on indexes please see www.schwab.com/indexdefinitions. Past performance is no guarantee of future results and the opinions presented cannot be viewed as an indicator of future performance. Diversification strategies do not ensure a profit and do not protect against losses in declining markets. The policy analysis provided by the Charles Schwab & Co., Inc., does not constitute and should not be interpreted as an endorsement of any political party. Apple Podcasts and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Google Podcasts and the Google Podcasts logo are trademarks of Google LLC. Spotify and the Spotify logo are registered trademarks of Spotify AB. (0221-1EPK)
29 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu