Episode 51 - An Interview with Memory Expert Boris Konrad
Play • 18 min

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Show Notes:

In Episode 51, Cindy interviews memory expert Boris Konrad (@borisnkonrad). Boris is an eight-time world memory champion, he has four entries in the Guinness Book of World Records, and he is the current president of MemoryXL. Cindy and Boris discuss memory techniques. Importantly, Boris discusses differences between memory techniques and learning techniques, the underlying neuroscience, and why they are both important for students.

Trending In Education
Trending In Education
Palmer Media
Innovation in Higher Education with Dr. Bridget Burns
In this episode, we're excited to welcome Dr. Bridget Burns to Trending in Education to talk about innovation in higher education. Named one of the “Most Innovative People in Higher Education” by Washington Monthly, Bridget is the founding Executive Director of the University Innovation Alliance (UIA). The UIA is the groundbreaking national consortium of public research universities working together to test and scale innovations that close achievement gaps and improve outcomes for all students. Since its founding in 2014, the UIA campuses have increased their low-income degrees awarded by 37% (producing over 30,000 additional low-income graduates to date) and increased graduates of color by 73%. The Alliance has been featured in national outlets like 60 Minutes, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Fast Company, and in the documentary "Unlikely". The UIA has inspired and supported the formation of more than 15 other university networks working to improve postsecondary success for low-income students. We begin by hearing Bridget's origin story as an education professional which takes us back to her roots in rural Montana and community college before finding her way into higher education and ultimately the UIA. We explore how the UIA was founded and their mission of understanding how universities can innovate, how they can test ideas across different university cultures and contexts, and how they can spread the word about what they're learning. Bridget shares what it was like to work with Michael Crow at ASU as the UIA was first coming together and as it's grown and evolved since. Bridget provides examples of how innovations have emerged across the 11 member institutions of the UIA and looks ahead to where she sees the organization heading in the future. She also shares her perspective on new and emerging media like Tik Tok and its relevance in reaching the rising generations. It's a fascinating conversation and we thank Dr. Burns for sharing her time and perspective to the show. If you like what you're hearing, follow us at TrendinginEducation.com and wherever you get your podcasts.
35 min
Digital HR Leaders with David Green
Digital HR Leaders with David Green
David Green
52. How Singapore Uses Skills Data to Support Lifelong Learning (Interview with Wenshan Xu)
Welcome to episode two of series 11 of The Digital HR Leaders podcast. According to the latest Future of Jobs report from The World Economic Forum, by 2025 50% of all employees will need to be re-skilled. Moreover also by 2025, the same research predicts that 97 million new jobs will emerge and 85 million will be displaced by a shift in labour between humans and machines. Most commentators believe that the pandemic has only accelerated this progress. Skills is not just a challenge for organisations it is a challenge for entire countries and Singapore is setting a template that others could and perhaps should follow. The mission of SkillsFuture SG, or SSG for short, is to build a skills competitive Singapore and a nation of resilient and confident lifelong learners. My guest today is Wenshan Xu, Deputy Director of The Skills Development Group at SSG. Wenshan describes the unit as an intelligence unit for skills and as you are about to hear, the work they are doing is as fascinating as it is important. In our conversation Wenshan and I discuss: * How SSG helps re-skill workers in sectors affected by Covid and then helps them transition to sectors that were hiring * How SSG works with employers, education providers and citizens to create a skills and learning ecosystem that meets the changing requirements of jobs in the country * How Wenshan’s team uses data, analytics and machine learning to understand the supply and demand of skills now and in the future * The skills taxonomy that they have developed, which encompasses 34 skills frameworks, 11,000 skills competencies and over a thousand job roles * How all this supports the vision for talent mobility in Singapore This episode is a must listen for anyone interested or involved in skills, learning and workforce planning. So that is business leaders, CHROs and anyone in a people analytics or HR business partner role. Support for this podcast is brought to you by orgvue . To learn more, visit https://www.orgvue.com/.
51 min
Education Bookcast
Education Bookcast
Stanislaw Pstrokonski
103. What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy by James Paul Gee
What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy is a book that I read early in my education research quest. At the time, I thought that it had interesting points to make, but I was unclear on quite how to react to it. After several more years of reading and research, it's clear to me that this book is deeply flawed. First of all, the author redefines "literacy" in a very strange way. He takes any form of semiotic system to count as a "type" of literacy. So, for example, if you know how to use a smartphone, then you are "literate" in the layout, symbols, and conventions of smartphone user interface. This is obviously not the kind of literacy that most people are interested on or concerned about, and it is less valuable than "conventional" literacy, partly because of barrier to entry (learning to read is relatively hard, learning to use a phone is relatively easy) and partly because of utility. Secondly, he coins a lot of new terminology for no apparent reason. During the recording I've had to translate some of his terms into more ordinary language, including the usual technical terms rather than his special ones. His terminology only serves to obscure his message and make it seem as if there is more content here than there really is. Finally, and most importantly, his central point is misguided. He essentially says that learning a subject is mostly about socially getting on in that world - knowing how to get on with other artists, mathematicians, surgeons, or whatever other skill "community", depending on the domain. However, this completely overlooks the glaring difference in difficulty between getting to know social conventions and attitudes of a subculture and learning the requisite knowledge and skills in order to be useful and productive in that domain, let alone to actually understand what is being said by other practitioners. The former takes a matter of weeks or months of acculturation, and the latter years or even decades of dedication. If we focus on the social context of knowledge rather than the knowledge itself, to coin a phrase, it would be like making beautiful light fittings for a house that you haven't built - pointless in the absence of the larger task that is left undone. Enjoy the episode. *** RELATED EPISODES Cognitive science (general): 19. Seven Myths about Education by Daisy Christodoulou; 52. How We Learn by Benedict Carey; 79. What Learning Is; 80. The Chimp Paradox by Steve Peters; 81a. The Myth of Learning Styles; 81b. on the Expertise Reversal Effect; 82. Memorable Teaching by Pepps McCrea; 85. Why Don't Students Like School? by Dan Willingham; 86. Learning as information compression Cognitive science (literacy-related): 41. What Reading Does for the Mind by Keith Stanovich and Annie Cunningham; 91. Vocabulary Development by Steven Stahl; 93. Closing the Vocabulary Gap by Alex Quigley; 95. The Reading Mind by Dan Willingham Expertise: 20. Genius Explained by Michael Howe; 22. The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle; 24. Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell; 49. The Art of Learning by Josh Waitzkin; 97. The Polymath by Waqas Ahmed; 98. Range by David Epstein Games and play (including computer games): 34. Reality is Broken by Jane McGonigal; 35. Minds on Fire by Mark Carnes; 36. Fun, Play, and Games; 37. A Theory of Fun for Game Design by Raph Koster Other fads / critical reviews: 42. Do Schools Kill Creativity by Sir Ken Robinson; 53. Brain-based Learning by Eric Jensen; 59, 60 on Brain Training; 62. Brainstorming makes you less creative; 65. Beyond the Hole in the Wall (on Sugata Mitra); 71. Visible Learning by John Hattie; 81. on Learning Styles; 87. Experiential Learning; 88. The Failure of Constructivist, Discovery, Problem-Based, Experiential, and Inquiry-Based Teaching
1 hr 30 min
Google Teacher Podcast
Google Teacher Podcast
Matt Miller and Kasey Bell - Education Podcast Network
Tips from Teachers - GTP125
Google News and Updates * Additional language support for live captions in Google Meet * Create and work with documents that contain multiple page orientations in Google Docs * Open Office attachments from Gmail in Google Docs, Sheets, or Slides with one click * Some Google Meet settings now “sticky” for Education users * Take a snowy stroll with Street View * Create a festive song with Blob Opera * 20 years of Year in Search Featured Content * Pam Hubler had a possible idea to answer a question in e124 using Wakelet to curate Google materials * Another possible answer to the same question from Stephanie Litz * Hello Matt and Kasey, * So thankful for your podcast, keep up the good work because your listeners appreciate it. * Regarding the question from Marcel (below), I found this resource that might be a good fit: * Cube For Teachers Website - Cube For Teachers is a place where educators search, share, and store links to free open educational K-12 resources, including lessons, activities, interactive games, teaching strategies, tech tips, videos, special education, subject-specific resources, and more. * Cube For Teachers - Chrome Web Store * @cubeforteachers Dr. Rebecca Kreider from Mt. Olivetownship school district, verbal feedback is 3x as effective. She recommends Mote. Ditch Summit tips: * Matt Miller: Mote Chrome extension for voice feedback. Use your dictation/voice typing command on a mobile device. * Esther Park: use unscreen.com to create a GIF from a short video clip * Paula Martinez from Slides Mania: The master is for teachers. Duplicate layouts in the master for different versions of pages. Click on the “Colors” button in the master for master colors. * Desiree Alexander: Make files available offline or downloadable so students won’t need internet access to complete at home. * How to Access Google Files Offline * Kasey: Google certifications, magnetic poetry, Google Drawings, making ebooks with Google Slides, the resources she shared in her session * How to Create Drag and Drop activities * Register for Ditch Summit, a FREE online conference for teachers available until January 8: DitchSummit.com On The Blogs * Matt * New book, Do More with Google Classroom, is available! * Check out the book companion website for resources * Ditch Summit: Free online conference for teachers, December 14 to January 8 * Kasey * 8 Reasons to Love Blended Learning with Google * EARLY BIRD Special! Buy Blended Learning with Google, get FREE Google Tips Training * Blended Learning with Google (on Amazon) * Google from A to Z (on Amazon)
32 min
10 Minute Teacher Podcast
10 Minute Teacher Podcast
Vicki Davis
717 A Look Back at 2020 Teaching What It Means for 2021 with Pamela Livingston Gaudet
Yes, 2020 has been a year like no other, and today's guest, Pamela Livingston Guadet, interviewed a wide variety of school tech directors to hear their stories of triage teaching during the COVID-19 emergency. Today, she shares their wisdom, including the positives, negatives, the things that shocked her, and what her research shows that everyone should know about moving forward in 2021. Pamela is the author of the book, “Like No Other School Year: 2020, COVID-19 and the Growth of Online Learning." Sponsor: It’s a new year and time to plan your professional development with Advancement Courses. They offer over 280 online graduate-level PD courses in 20 subject areas. They are online and self-paced, so you can take them anywhere, any time with up to six months to complete. Receive graduate credit through CAEP and regionally accredited university partners or for continuing education units that meet your state requirements. And right now, you can save 20% off each course with the code COOL20 -- that’s just $120 per graduate credit hour or $160 for 50 clock hours. Go to advancementcourses.com/coolcat and use the coupon code COOL20. www.coolcatteacher.com/e717 Pamela Livingston Gaudet - Bio As Submitted Pamela (Livingston) Gaudet is the author of “Like No Other School Year: 2020, COVID-19 and the Growth of Online Learning” For the book, Pamela interviewed public, independent and international school technology directors to hear their stories of triage teaching during the COVID-19 emergency including what was important and what is still needed for online learning. Pamela was a technology director and teacher at public, charter and independent schools and then moved to education technology companies where she built products used by millions of students in K-12 schools. Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
13 min
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