Caregiving for Schizophrenia
Play • 57 min

A third of all people will be a caregiver at some point in their lives. Caregiving for people with schizophrenia presents challenges that many people are ill-prepared for. 

Host Rachel Star and Gabe Howard break down the principles of caregiving and creative ways to navigate schizophrenia. 

Dr. Sarah Kopelovich joins to share schizophrenia caregiver specific training. 

The One Inside: An Internal Family Systems (IFS) podcast
The One Inside: An Internal Family Systems (IFS) podcast
Tammy Sollenberger
IFS and Masculinity and Jericho Circles with Steve Spitzer and Glenn Williams
On today's episode, I chat with Steve Spitzer and Glenn Williams. Steve, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Suffolk University in Boston, has taught, researched, and written on crime, justice and social control for three decades. He is Level 2 IFS trained and has presented his use of the IFS model inside prisons at multiple IFS annual conferences and has written articles in the IFS newsletter, The Outlook. In 2002, he founded the Jericho Circle Project, a non-profit organization that seeks to 'bring down the walls' by creating men's support groups in correctional facilities. Since the project began, almost 1000 incarcerated men have sat in Jericho Circles in county, state, and federal correctional institutions in Massachusetts, Maine, and Rhode Island. Glenn participated in the Jericho groups when he was incarcerated for 21 years and later met Steve in a different context. Glenn now 'pays it forward' with his organization, Our House Boston. Glenn is Level One IFS trained and is passionate about spreading the word about our True Essence, especially to black men in urban settings. Glenn is a reentry advocate and community investor who works with various individuals, families, organizations and businesses to raise awareness about and create solutions to the challenges of incarceration and prisoner reintegration. This conversation is AMAZING. I cannot convey this in words. Here are some themes: 'Self' Discovery Masculinity Men's work inside prisons, power of vulnerability, and speaking for parts 'Climbing out of the man box'/Taking off masks The importance of power in manliness for Black Men Glenn states, "Who I pretend to be (what my community and society says I need to be in order to survive) and my Essence are not the same thing." And, "IFS offers the opportunity for Self Discovery and Self Exploration (inside and outside of prison). Discovering that my shame and guilt are parts of me and do not have to define who I am at my core." To find more about Jericho circle go to https://jerichocircle.org/ Check out this 90 minute documentary on the nature of their group work that was filmed at California State Prison Sacramento. That film, produced by the group that initially mentored them in the work (Inside Circle), will give you a taste of the kind of work done (albeit at a somewhat higher level of intensity than is typical of Jericho Circle’s groups) on their weekends. Video is found here: https://www.topic.com/the-work To register for the Heirloom Summit on Feb 24-26 and get a special discount as a listener of the podcast: https://www.blacktherapistsrock.com/Products/Products.aspx I'd love to connect with you at ifstammy on Instagram and Twitter and on The One Inside Facebook page. Enjoy!
56 min
The Psych Central Podcast: Mental Health Made Simple
The Psych Central Podcast: Mental Health Made Simple
Healthline Media
Stigma of Borderline Personality Disorder
The stigma associated with borderline personality disorder (BPD) is well documented and undeserved. In this week’s episode, Dr. James Seymour explains this complicated condition, discusses the “borderline” label, and explores the role past traumas may have in the development of BPD. Psychiatrist Dr. Seymour is the director of the Sierra Tucson’s Chrysalis Program. Listen now! Guest Information for 'Stigma of Borderline' Podcast Episode Psychiatrist Dr. James Seymour, who joined Sierra Tucson in 2010, is the Director of the Arizona-based mental health treatment center’s patient-centered Chrysalis Program. Dr. Seymour received his medical degree from the University of Tennessee and completed his psychiatric residency at the University of Virginia. He is a Somatic Experiencing Therapy practitioner, and board-certified by both the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and the American Board of Addiction Medicine. Trained in Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy, Dr. Seymour’s expertise spans trauma recovery, addictions, cognitive behavioral therapy, and somatic mind-body therapies. About The Psych Central Podcast Host Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations, available from Amazon; signed copies are also available directly from the author. To learn more about Gabe, please visit his website, gabehoward.com.
24 min
Shrink Rap Radio
Shrink Rap Radio
David Van Nuys, Ph.D.
#733 Anthropologist Roy Grinker on his book Nobody’s Normal
Roy Richard Grinker is Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Grinker was born and raised in Chicago where his great-grandfather, grandfather, and father worked as psychoanalysts. He graduated from Grinnell College in 1983 and received his Ph.D. in Social Anthropology at Harvard University in 1989.  He is the author of Nobody’s Normal: How Culture Created the Stigma of Mental Illness (NY: W.W. Norton, January 2021), Unstrange Minds: Remapping the World of Autism (NY: Basic Books), In the Arms of Africa: The Life of Colin M. Turnbull (Chicago: University of Chicago), Korea and its Futures: Unification and the Unfinished War (NY: St. Martin’s), and Houses in the Rainforest: Ethnicity and Inequality among Farmers and Foragers in Central Africa (Berkeley: University of California). He is co-editor of Perspectives on Africa: Culture, History, and Representation (Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell) and Companion to the Anthropology of Africa (Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell). Grinker was a 2008 recipient of the National Alliance on Mental Illness KEN award for “outstanding contribution to the understanding of mental illness” and the 2010 recipient of the American Anthropological Association’s Anthropology in the Media award for “communication of anthropology to the general public through the media.” Twitter: @roygrinker https://anthropology.columbian.gwu.edu/roy-richard-grinker www.royrichardgrinker.com Sign up for 10% off of Shrink Rap Radio CE credits at the Zur Institute
Play
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
225: The Self-Centered Podcast Featuring Special Guest, Dr. Jill Levitt!
At the start of today’s podcast, we got an update on the Feeling Great app from Jeremy Karmel. We are looking for one or more programmers who might like to join our project. Our goal is to create the first electronic tool that can outperform human therapists, and some super promising preliminary data suggests we may be on the right path to make this happen. We are looking for talented engineers and designers who would share our passion for this incredible dream. If you are interested, contact Jeremy@FeelingGreatapp.com Today we are joined by our beloved and brilliant colleague, Dr. Jill Levitt to ask two questions: * Can the “self” be judged? * Does the “self” exist? We got quite a bit of positive feedback to a recent Ask David Podcast that included a question about Buddhism, but people said they wanted more on the topic of the “great death” of the self. Bottom line was this: * You can judge your own or someone else’s specific thoughts and actions, but you cannot judge your (or somebody else’s) “self.” * The question, “does the ‘self’ exist,” is meaningless. * The goal of therapy is not to get promoted from the “worthless” to the “worthwhile” category, but to reject these categories as having no meaning. David argues that it is impossible to feel depressed without the distortions of Overgeneralization and Labeling—that where you jump from a specific flaw or problem, like getting rejected by your boyfriend to some abstract label or judgment, like thinking you are “unloveable.” We also used the real-life example of David responding to criticisms that he was too harsh with Steven Hayes on Episode 220. We show how TEAM therapy works, and illustrate several techniques for crushing the Negative Thoughts that lead to the painful negative thoughts that including Overgeneralization and Labeling, including: * Empathy * Positive Reframing * Externalization of Voices * Be Specific * Acceptance Paradox * Feared Fantasy We also focused on the concept of “laughing enlightenment,” a key Buddhist concept, along with the “great death” of the self. When you lose your “self,” you actually lose nothing, because there was nothing there in the first place. This is a kind of cosmic joke. But you inherit the world and gain liberation from your suffering, along with great joy, and of course, sadness as well. We also summarized the thinking of Ludwig Wittgenstein, arguably the greatest philosopher of all time, and how his sudden insight when a soccer ball hit him in the head transformed the history of philosophy. He was an extremely lonely man who had numerous episodes of depression, and never attempted to publish anything when he was alive, because only a handful of students and colleagues could understand what he was trying to say. This was intensely frustrating to him, because his message was so simple, clear, and basic—and yet the great philosophers could not grasp it. The Buddha had the same problem. The book, Philosophical Investigations was published in 1950, right after his death. It is just a series of numbered paragraphs, or brief comments, on different everyday themes, like bricklayers, string, games, and so forth. It is was based on a metal box they found under his bed, which contained notes from his weekly seminars at Cambridge. Many people, including myself, consider it as the greatest book in the history of philosophy, and think of Wittgenstein as the man who killed, or ended, philosophy. According to Wikipedia, the famed British philosopher, Bertrand Russell, described Wittgenstein as "perhaps the most perfect example I have ever known of genius as traditionally conceived; passionate, profound, intense, and dominating." Although Wittgenstein did not focus emotional problems, his solution to all the problems of philosophy is very similar to cognitive therapy. Here is the parallel: You don’t try to solve the classic “free will” problem. Instead, you see through it and give it up as nonsensical, as language that's "out of gear," so to speak. Once you “see this,” and understand why it is true, it is incredibly liberating. But it can be a lonely experience, because you suddenly “see” something super-obvious that seems to be invisible to 99.9% of humans. It's as if you had a "third eye," and could see something incredible that people with only two eyes cannot see. By the same token, when you suddenly “see” that the idea that you have a “self” which could be “superior” or “inferior” is nonsensical, it is also incredibly liberating. This, in fact, is the cognitive therapy version of spiritual “enlightenment.” And that's also one of the goals of the TEAM-CBT that my collegues and I have created. Jill, Rhonda, and David
1 hr 18 min
The Trauma Therapist
The Trauma Therapist
Guy Macpherson, PhD
Episode 501: Thema Bryant, PhD. Managing in The Midst of The Current Outbreak with Dignity: The Marginalized Populations
Today, I'm continuing to re-post this series I did a few months back, Managing in The Midst of The Current Outbreak , with none other than Dr. Thema Bryant Davis. Why? Because I feel we could use her hope. Thema, a repeat guest on this podcast, is a light of hope for all of us. Watch this interview and you’ll feel it. Thema is a licensed psychologist, ordained minister, and sacred artist who has worked nationally and globally to provide relief and empowerment to marginalized persons. Dr. Thema, a professor at Pepperdine University, is a past president of the Society for the Psychology of Women. Her contributions to psychological research, policy, and practice have been honored by national and regional psychological associations. Dr. Thema earned her doctorate from Duke University, completed her post-doctoral training at Harvard Medical Center, and is a past American Psychological Association representative to the United Nations. She has served as a mental health media consultant for numerous print, radio, and television media outlets, including but not limited to the Huffington Post, NPR, CBS, Oxygen, CNN, BET, TV One, Lifetime, and We TV. Using artistic expression, spirituality, psychology and culture, Dr. Bryant-Davis is an internationally recognized lecturer, performer, and minister. She has presented at conferences, universities, churches, community centers, schools and prisons throughout the United States as well as in South America, Europe, Africa and the Caribbean. Dr. Bryant-Davis is an ordained minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. She leads a community mental health bible study at Walker Temple AME Church in Los Angeles and lives by words from her mother, Rev. Cecelia Williams Bryant, who states “God is speaking. My life is God’s vocabulary.” Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-trauma-therapist-podcast-with-guy-macpherson-phd-inspiring-interviews-with-thought-leaders-in-the-field-of-trauma/donations Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy
31 min
Psychologists Off The Clock
Psychologists Off The Clock
Diana Hill, Debbie Sorensen, Yael Schonbrun & Jill Stoddard
#181 Stop Avoiding Stuff with Matt Boone
Show notes: In today’s world, it’s easy to stay on-the-go. Sometimes, on-the-go behaviors are necessary and functional. But often we engage in these behaviors to avoid discomfort. In this episode of Psychologists Off the Clock, Jill and Matt Boone, co-author of Stop Avoiding Stuff, discuss avoidant behavior and how to address it with skills from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Make a committed action and join us in this episode to learn more about what you might be avoiding and how to respond instead! Listen and Learn: Jill and Debbie’s personal encounters with “doom scrolling” and other behaviors that feel good in the moment but cost us in the long-run Matt’s breakdown of what his book, Stop Avoiding Stuff, is about and how you can benefit from it Why Matt decided to write about avoidance in a digestible (bathroom-book) format About Matt’s professional understanding of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy  Other places where Matt can train you in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy How to effectively use your understanding of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to practice the skills in Matt's book  Why Matt’s accessible explanations of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy are particularly useful right now The inside-scoop on what’s inside Matt's book   Practical advice on how to identify and become more mindful of your own avoidant behaviors  Exercises for practicing awareness and willingness right now!  How Matt came to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and what role it plays in his personal life Resources: Matt’s book, Stop Avoiding Stuff: 25 Microskills to Face Your Fears and Do It Anyway, and the editor of Mindfulness and Acceptance in Social Work  Jill’s books, Be Mighty and The Big Book of ACT Metaphors  Matt’s webinar on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy  Sign up for POTC’s First Annual Wise Minds Summit: How to Adapt and Thrive in Today’s Challenging Times About Matt Boone: Matt Boone is a social worker, psychotherapist, and public speaker who specializes in translating mental health concepts for the general public. He is the co-author, with Jennifer Gregg and Lisa Coyne, of Stop Avoiding Stuff: 25 Microskills to Face Your Fears and Do It Anyway, and the editor of Mindfulness and Acceptance in Social Work. He is the director of programming and outreach at the student mental health services of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, where he’s an instructor in psychiatry.  At Lyra Health, a mental health tech startup, he led the clinical development of Lyra’s mental health coaching program and gave talks on subjects like stress and stigma to audiences at Facebook, Uber, and Genentech. At Cornell University, he oversaw the development of Let's Talk, an outreach program to underserved students that has since been replicated at nearly 100 colleges and universities.   He is an Association of Contextual Behavioral Science peer-reviewed acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) trainer and a former consultant for the VA ACT for Depression training rollout. He regularly provides ACT trainings for professionals and the general public.  He lives in Little Rock with his wife, cat, and guitars, and he loves talking about mental health with people who think psychotherapy and self-help are a bit cringy. Find out more about Matt on his website, matthewsboone.com.    Related Episodes: Episode 180. Choosing to Live Your Values with Benji Schoendorff Episode 121. Be Mighty: An Episode for Stressed Out, Worried Women with Dr. Jill Stoddard Episode 116. Building a Meaningful, Values-based Life with Dr. Jenna LeJeune Episode 102. A Liberated Mind with Dr. Steven Hayes      Episode 72. Committed Action with Dr. DJ Moran
56 min
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