Living Planet: The ways we need water
Play • 30 min
Although freshwater sustains us in so many ways, it's often taken for granted — until it's gone. Peatlands drained for palm oil plantations in Indonesia exact an ecological and human toll. Kenya's Athi River, once a prime tourist attraction, has become a stinking cesspool. And, Bhutan banks on hydropower for its clean energy development.
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
The "Perfect" Little Economy of New Zealand
This is new Zealand, a picturesque nation whos economy looks to exclusively rely on throwing their tourists off cliffs in increasingly imaginative ways and being left off of world maps. But Australia’s little brother is so much more than that and it might truely be the world’s best managed economy. Everything from the world banks ease of doing business index, from multiple quality of life assessments puts new zealand in the top spot. Move aside Norway. What’s more is that it has achieved this remarkable prosperity despite not having a huge supply of natural resources, or acting as some tax haven for global businesses like so many other apparent economic miracles we have explored before. No New Zealand has got to where it is today by carefully managing a market economy and providing a safe, stable and confidence inspiring place to start a family, a business, and a career. Of course there are still some problems and we will certainly get to them but after exploring the Economy of Argentina last week, it’s now time to get out your pen and paper and take notes on how to actually run an economy. And to do this as always we are going to break the economy into some important categories. What are the primary drivers of New Zealand's economic prosperity? How has the nation been able to accommodate these where other nations fail to do so? And what are the challenges the nation might face to keep this success going? Once thats all done we can then put New zealand on the economics explained national leaderboard.
18 min
Sustainababble
Sustainababble
Sustainababble: comedy, nature, climate change.
#205: Wikipedia
"Where'd ya read that then, Wikipedia?!?@!" used to be the refrain of bell-ends everywhere who couldn't be bothered to engage with an argument. But like most insults, it carried a grain of truth because the internet's crowdsourced encyclopaedia was, well, ropey.Not any more. In fact, in a world eating itself alive with fake news and misinformation, Wikipedia is one of the few shining lights of humans doing Admirable Things online in the name of public interest. Not least on climate change, where the wealth and - more importantly - accessibility of information is exemplary. But who are the unseen elves keeping climate pages accurate and Inhofery-free, why do they give up their free time to do it, and are they in fact some of the most influential climate-y people on the planet? Alex Stinson, a Senior Program Strategist with the Wikimedia Foundation and a Wikipedia editor with focus on climate change joins us to pull back the curtain and share some really big numbers. Numbers like 319 (different language wikipedias), 50+ million (wikipedia articles) and 1.7 billion (monthly page views). Cue Ol going for a lie down.Follow Alex on twitter @sadads, get involved in the editing community here, and read this great Mashable piece about the guardians of climate wikipedia.Sustainababble is your friendly environment podcast, out weekly. Theme music by the legendary Dicky Moore – @dickymoo. Sustainababble logo by the splendid Arthur Stovell. Ecoguff read out by Arabella. Love the babble? Bung us a few pennies at www.patreon.com/sustainababble. MERCH: sustainababble.teemill.com Available on iTunes, Spotify, Acast & all those types of things, or at sustainababble.fish. Visit us at @thebabblewagon and at Facebook.com/sustainababble. Email us at hello@sustainababble.fish.
48 min
LSE Podcasts
LSE Podcasts
LSE Podcasts
Scroungers versus Strivers: the myth of the welfare state
To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk…unesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iq Welcome to LSE's award-winning podcast, LSE IQ, where we ask leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer an intelligent question about economics, politics or society. This episode is dedicated to social policy giant Professor Sir John Hills, who died in December 2020. In this episode, John tackles the myth that the welfare state supports a feckless underclass who cost society huge amounts of money. Instead, he sets out a system where most of what we pay in, comes back to us. He describes a generational contract which we all benefit from, varying on our stage of life. His words remain timely after a year of pandemic which has devastated many people’s livelihoods. Many of us have had to rely on state support in ways that we could not have anticipated, perhaps challenging our ideas about what type of person receives benefits in the UK. This episode is based on an interview that John did with James Rattee for the LSE iQ podcast in 2017. It coincided with the LSE Festival which celebrated the anniversary of the publication of the ‘Beveridge Report’ in 1947 - a blueprint for a British universal care system by former LSE Director William Beveridge. Professor Sir John Hills CBE, was Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at LSE and Chair of CASE. His influential work didn’t just critique government policy on poverty and inequality, it changed it. He advised on a wide range of issues including pensions reform, fuel poverty, council housing, income and wealth distribution. Contributors Professor John Hills Research Good Times Bad Times: the welfare myth of them and us. Bristol: Policy Press by John Hills (2015)
20 min
DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast
DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast
Kira Dineen
#141 Stan Crooke on Ultra Rare Disease Drugs
Biotech titan Dr. Stan Crooke joins host Kira Dineen to celebrate rare disease month! Dr. Crooke was the Founder of IONIS Pharmaceuticals, with extensive experience in the pharmaceutical industry developing more than 20 marketed drugs. He has published nearly 500 scientific publications, edited more than 20 books, and has numerous patents.  Dr. Stan Crooke is now the Founder and CEO of n-Lorem Foundation, a new San Diego-based organization with an incredible mission of developing individualized RNA targeted medicines for patients with ultra-rare diseases, and providing those treatments for free, for life. These patients have extremely unique mutations and are often only one of 30 people in the entire world to have the disease. After only one year as a foundation, they’ve already made great progress for the ultra rare community, having received 50 applications from patients with ultra rare genetic mutations. Out of those 50, they have greenlighted treatment plans for nearly 20 patients - greatly exceeding application and acceptance rate expectations.  On This Episode We Discuss: Rare diseases vs ultra rare diseases Challenges treating patients with ultra rare diseases and genetic mutations Standard process and cost of drug development n-Lorem’s new approach to drug development for ultra rare diseases  Antisense therapies (ASOs) n-Lorem’s charitable and scalable model  n-Lorem’s relationship with IONIS Pharmaceuticals People eligible for n-Lorem’s treatments How to contact n-Lorem’s for potential treatment  Drugs currently in development at n-Lorem Insight on the development of SPINRAZA® for spinal muscular atrophy  Learn more about n-Lorem on their website.  Check out the UConn Podcast Symposium, our host Kira Dineen will be on the interdisciplinary panel taking place on February 22nd at 4PM EST. You can register to attend for free here. UConn students will be provided a Zoom link to engage in a live Q&A. The panel will also be streamed publicly via Facebook and YouTube. Stay tuned for the next new episode of DNA Today on March 5th, 2021! New episodes are released on the first and third Friday of the month. In the meantime, you can binge over 140 other episodes on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, streaming on the website, or any other podcast player by searching, “DNA Today”. Brand new in 2021, episodes are now also recorded with video which you can watch on our YouTube channel.   See what else we are up to on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and our website, DNApodcast.com. Questions/inquiries can be sent to info@DNApodcast.com.
Play
Social Science Bites
Social Science Bites
SAGE Publishing
Michèle Lamont on Stigma
The study of stigma, , says Michèle Lamont, is a “booming field.” That assessment can be both sad and hopeful, and in this Social Science Bites podcast the Harvard sociologist explains stigma’s manifestations and ways to combat it, as well as what it takes for a researcher to actually study stigma. Lamont defines stigma “as the negative characterization of any social attribute,” and offers examples such as mental illness, social status, or obesity as conditions routinely stigmatized. And while stigma can attach itself to an individual or to a group, stigma requires intersubjective agreement for it to function. As that intersubjectivity would suggest, the specifics of stigma varies by culture, a point brought home by Lamont’s own research among stigmatized groups in the United States, Brazil, Israel (and which saw her 2016 co-authored book Getting Respect: Responding to Stigma and Discrimination in the United States, Brazil, and Israel). The work involved more than 400 interviews, conducted by members of the stigmatized groups, in the three countries, and Lamont offers insights into how stigma plays out. The project paid people $20 in the U.S. to be interviewed, but the Brazilian team said Brazilians would be insulted if they were offered money to participate. In Israel, Palestinians being surveyed didn’t trust Tel Aviv University, so that created obstacles even though the team members were themselves Palestinian Lamont cites the work of Erving Goffman, who studied this experience of having a negative mark. (See this earlier Social Science Bites podcast for a look at Goffman’s legacy.) One key concept is that of “front stage” and “back stage,” where someone manages their life in a public way (the domain of stigma) but also in a private way. Lamont, professor of sociology and of African and African American studies and the Robert I. Goldman Professor of European Studies at Harvard, directs the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. She was president of the American Sociological Association in 2016-17 and chaired the Council for European Studies from 2006-09. She received a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in 1996, a Gutenberg research award in 2014, the 2017 Erasmus Prize, and an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship for 2019-21. To download an MP3 of this podcast, right-click HERE and save.
24 min
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