The Portal
The Portal
Aug 12, 2020
40: Introducing The Portal Essay Club - What if everyone is simply insane?
1 hr 11 min

If you have ever wondered whether you were crazy when everyone else claims to see things differently than you do, this is the episode for you.

Book clubs are everywhere and we are always asked for book recommendations. But what about the great Essays, Interviews, Conversations, Aphorisms, Shaggy Dog Stories, Lyrics, Courtroom Testimonies, Poems, Movie Scenes, Jokes and the like? Sadly, there is almost never a club in which to discuss them. Yet there are Essays and offerings in other intellectual formats that are just as profound and meaningful as any book while having the advantage of being much more in keeping with modern attention spans. The Portal seeks to fill this obvious lacuna. 

We thus finish out the regular first year of the Portal Podcast with an inaugural episode of an experiment: The Portal Essay Club. In this episode Eric reads aloud an astonishing essay from 1944 by Arthur Koestler which changed his world. In the essay, Koestler wrestles with a difficult question that has plagued independent thinkers for ages: what if everyone who is supposedly 'normal' is actually a maniac living in a dream world? What if the only sane ones appear crazy just as the crazy appear sane? 

During the episode, Eric first reads aloud the essay "The Nightmare That Is A Reality." and then discusses paragraph by paragraph what makes this one of the most profound yet often forgotten essays to have appeared within the twilight of living memory (1944 as it happens). We hope you will enjoy this experiment and let us know what you would like to see appear next in this series. 

Thanks for a great first year. 


Thank You From Our Sponsors

Mack Weldon: For 20% off your first order visit www.mackweldon.com AND ENTER PROMO CODE: PORTAL

ExpressVPN: Protect your online activity today at www.expressvpn.com/PORTAL and get an extra 3 months FREE on a one-year package.

NetSuite: Receive your FREE guide – “Seven Actions Businesses Need to Take Now” and schedule your

FREE Product Tour at www.netsuite.com/PORTAL

Unagi Scooters: Get $150 off your own Unagi E500 electric scooter while supplies last at www.unagiscooters.com PROMO CODE PORTAL


The Peter Attia Drive
The Peter Attia Drive
Peter Attia, MD
#139 - Kristin Neff, Ph.D.: The power of self-compassion
Kristin Neff is a Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas, author, and a leading expert on mindful self-compassion. In this episode, she shares how developing a self-compassion and mindfulness practice was the most effective tool for relieving her own suffering, and provides strategies and tactics to improve self-compassion and well-being. We discuss: * The life crisis that turned Kristin to mindfulness and self-compassion (3:30); * How mindful self-compassion relieved Kristin’s feelings of self-judgement, and the psychology that says we all have the capacity for self-compassion (9:45); * Peter’s history of self-criticism and his personal practice of self-compassion (17:15); * The problem with prioritizing self-esteem over self-compassion, and how self-compassion produces a more stable version of self-worth (20:15); * An argument for self-compassion over self-criticism for optimizing performance (26:15); * How and when to introduce self-compassion to children (31:45); * Learning her son had autism—a personal story of how Kristin used mindfulness and self-compassion (36:45); * Self-compassion for cases of childhood trauma, PTSD, and overcoming a “fear of compassion” (44:00); * The relationship between self-compassion and physical health (49:30); * Distinguishing between self-compassion and self-pity, and the three necessary components self-compassion (52:30); * Why self-criticism comes from a desire to be safe, the circular pattern of self-judgment, and self-compassion as the ultimate motivator (55:45); * Potential role of a self-compassion practice for addiction and other maladaptive behaviors (58:45); * Clinical applications and practical uses of self-compassion (1:01:30); * Why you don’t need to meditate to learn mindfulness and self-compassion (1:04:45); * Kristin’s personal meditation practice (1:08:40); * Resources for learning self-compassion (1:11:45); and * More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/kristinneff Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on _Faceboo__k_ | _Twitter_ | _Instagram_.
1 hr 17 min
Two for Tea with Iona Italia and Helen Pluckrose
Two for Tea with Iona Italia and Helen Pluckrose
Iona Italia and Helen Pluckrose
69 - Ewan Morrison - Utopias and Dystopias [Public Limited Version]
To follow Ewan’s work: https://www.ewanmorrison.com/ His 2012 collection, Tales from the Mall, can be found here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tales-Mall-Ewan-Morrison/dp/1908885017 His 2019 novel, Nina X, can be found here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Nina-X-Ewan-Morrison/dp/0708899013 His 2013 book Close Your Eyes can be found here: https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/109/1091019/close-your-eyes/9780099565758.html His 2005 collection The Last Book You Read can be round here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Last-Book-You-Read/dp/1845020480 Watch the 2015 film version of Ewan’s novel, Swung, here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OmcvLt5BOmU Ewan on utopian communities: https://areomagazine.com/2019/04/26/why-we-join-cults/ https://areomagazine.com/2018/03/08/why-utopian-communities-fail/ https://areomagazine.com/2020/08/27/why-we-must-walk-away-from-omelas-the-problem-with-utopias/ Follow Ewan on Twitter: @mrewanmorrison Some of the Other References Emma Donoghue, Room (2010) Will Storr, Selfie: How We Became So Self-Obsessed and What It's Doing to Us (2017) Thomas More, Utopia (1516); Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Herland (1915); William Morris, News from Nowhere (1890); H.G. Wells, A Modern Utopia (1905); Ursula K. Guin, The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas (1975); Leila (2019, Netflix); Sacred Games (2019, Netflix); Lois Lowry, The Giver (1993); The Maze Runner (2014); Smithereen (2020) Timestamps 1:57 Ewan reads from Nina X 3:48 Nina X, the novel. How we treat former cult victims, especially children. 11:58 Ewan’s personal experiences of utopian communities, cults and alternative lifestyles. 17:58 Competitive puritanism, taboos on feedback 24:41 Self-improvement and narcissism 26:26 Attitudes towards children in utopian communities 32:31 The distrust of individualism and its emotional impacts (Patrons only) 40:08 The alienations of modern life 46:25 Tricking ourselves into authenticity and doing versus having done 54:15 Shopping malls 59:25 Ewan’s experiences as a swinger and the novel Swung. 1:09:36 Dystopias and utopias in fiction and politics
36 min
Blocked and Reported
Blocked and Reported
Katie Herzog and Jesse Singal
Jordan Peterson Causes Tears, And Suzanne Moore Could Use Some Beers
After a very tense intro during which Jesse berates Katie for not being there when he needed her most, the hosts discuss a Vice News story about staffers at Penguin Random House Canada so overwhelmed by the existence of Jordan Peterson's new book that they broke down crying, and Guardian staffers so overwhelmed by the existence of a debate over certain claims about sex and gender that they drove columnist Suzanne Moore out. Show notes/Links: Vice World News: Penguin Random House Staff Confront Publisher About New Jordan Peterson Book - https://www.vice.com/en/article/g5bv3x/penguin-random-house-staff-confront-publisher-about-new-jordan-peterson-book (https://www.vice.com/en/article/g5bv3x/penguin-random-house-staff-confront-publisher-about-new-jordan-peterson-book) UnHerd: Why I had to leave The Guardian - https://unherd.com/2020/11/why-i-had-to-leave-the-guardian/ (https://unherd.com/2020/11/why-i-had-to-leave-the-guardian/) The Guardian: Women must have the right to organise. We will not be silenced - https://www.theguardian.com/society/commentisfree/2020/mar/02/women-must-have-the-right-to-organise-we-will-not-be-silenced (https://www.theguardian.com/society/commentisfree/2020/mar/02/women-must-have-the-right-to-organise-we-will-not-be-silenced) Suzanne Moore's Substack: https://suzannemoore.substack.com/p/pull-up-a-chair (https://suzannemoore.substack.com/p/pull-up-a-chair) The Guardian: The Guardian view on the Gender Recognition Act: where rights collide - https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/oct/17/the-guardian-view-on-the-gender-recognition-act-where-rights-collide (https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/oct/17/the-guardian-view-on-the-gender-recognition-act-where-rights-collide) The Guardian U.S.: Why we take issue with the Guardian’s stance on trans rights in the UK - https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/nov/02/guardian-editorial-response-transgender-rights-uk (https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/nov/02/guardian-editorial-response-transgender-rights-uk) Advertisers: Bidets! http://hellotushy.com/barpod (http://hellotushy.com/barpod) Dental stuff! https://www.getquip.com/barpod (https://www.getquip.com/barpod) HR services for your small business! https://www.bambee.com/blockedandreported (https://www.bambee.com/blockedandreported)
1 hr 5 min
New Discourses
New Discourses
New Discourses
The Next Chapter of the American Story
Human beings think in stories. We understand ourselves and the world, societies, social groups, and contexts we live in that way. One type of story is a national story, and in this episode of the New Discourses podcast, James Lindsay makes the case that Americans have, by and large, forgotten the totality of their own story. This has happened by placing too much focus and too much emphasis on one valuable and important part of the American story, which is equality. All men are, in fact, created equal, at least so far as liberal ethics should understand men, but this part of the American story exists in some tension with the other parts, especially the liberty part of the story, which is threatened by an overemphasis on equality in the same way that equality is threatened by an overemphasis on liberty. The truth is, even on a perfectly equal playing field, liberty will produce unequal outcomes because people will behave in unequal ways, and this form of inequality of outcome is just, even if inequality of opportunity isn't. In this podcast, Lindsay argues that Americans have mistaken the equality part of their story for the whole story, and in that the equality part of their story has been largely but not perfectly fulfilled, Americans now find themselves retelling the story in ever more tendentious ways, including Critical Social Justice. That is, Americans, in seeking to understand themselves against their own story, which they have misunderstood, are telling a kind of genre fiction on the equality story, trying to resurrect its themes in new ways to give themselves meaning and personal and social context. The Critical Social Justice, or Woke, story is comprehensible as a certain type of genre fiction on the equality portion of the American story, one that inverts the very values it claims to espouse in the pursuit not of further equality but of equity, which is a type of enforced equality of outcomes, regardless of behavior, talent, and merit. In the end Lindsay urges Americans to remember the totality of their story: liberty and equality in balance with one another, government with the consent of the governed, and a place, at least one place in the world, where these values can be kept alive. The American story has not been fulfilled, although it is not necessarily clear what its next chapters are. This podcast hopes to start finding the next parts of the American story. In that, Lindsay urges that Americans today are called to be keepers of the flame of liberty in a society that values and has, in largest part, achieved equality. They are also encouraged to offer their balanced model of federalism and anti-federalism, individual and national sovereign liberty, in this case, to the world as globalism increases with technology. Should the world refuse, Americans should not turn their backs on their story but should, instead, keep the flame of Americanism burning bright for any who should want it. Support New Discourses: paypal.me/newdiscourses patreon.com/newdiscourses subscribestar.com/newdiscourses youtube.com/channel/UC9K5PLkj0N_b9JTPdSRwPkg/join Website: newdiscourses.com Follow: facebook.com/newdiscourses twitter.com/NewDiscourses instagram.com/newdiscourses pinterest.com/newdiscourses/ linkedin.com/company/newdiscourses minds.com/newdiscourses reddit.com/r/NewDiscourses Podcast: @newdiscourses podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/new-…es/id1499880546 play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#…nzwvdjjpd6gg3cmuy open.spotify.com/show/0HfzDaXI5L4LnJQStFWgZp stitcher.com/podcast/new-discourses © 2020 New Discourses. All rights reserved.
55 min
Science Salon
Science Salon
Michael Shermer
145. Greg Lukianoff — How Free is Free Speech?
In this wide ranging conversation focused on Greg Lukianoff’s co-authored (with Jonathan Haidt) book The Coddling of the American Mind, and his new documentary film Mighty Ira: A Civil Liberties Story, about the free speech champion Ira Glassner, who headed the ACLU for decades, he and Shermer discuss: * the state of free speech today, * how coddled today’s students are, * the data on rates of depression and anxiety in students today, * possible causes of the coddling of the American mind: social media, screen time, culture of safetyism, culture of victimhood, helicopter parenting, the decline of unsupervised, child-directed play, * cancel culture and its effect on self-censorship and silencing speech, * current rates of deplatforming and canceling in academia, * the polarization of politics, * when self-censorship is healthy, * default to truth theory vs. default to skepticism theory, * How gullible are we, really? * how to combat the negative influencers on social media, * a brief history of free speech in the 20th and 21th centuries, * why people in power want to silence dissenters (even free speech advocates in power), and * the value of viewpoint diversity. Greg Lukianoff is the president and CEO of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE). Lukianoff is a graduate of American University and Stanford Law School. He specializes in free speech and First Amendment issues in higher education. He is the author of Unlearning Liberty: Campus Censorship and the End of American Debate and Freedom From Speech. Read about his new film: Mighty Ira: A Civil Liberties Story.
1 hr 11 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu