The One You Feed
The One You Feed
Feb 13, 2018
217: Will Schwalbe: On the Love of Reading Books
45 min

Please Support The Show with a Donation


Will Schwalbe is an author, entrepreneur, and journalist. He is also perhaps the most delightful, interesting and thoughtful person you've come across in a while. His love of books is infectious and as you know, Eric is a bibliophile himself so when the two talk about books and reading as they do in this episode, the result is one blissful experience. Do you love reading? Did you used to love reading but it's moved out of the spotlight of your life? Have you wanted to cultivate a love of reading? Are you looking for some really wonderful books to read? Are you alive and breathing? If your answer to any of these questions is yes, then this interview is for you.

He is the author of  Thoughts on Reading, Reflecting and Embracing Life, The End of Your Life Book Club and SEND: Why People Email So Badly and How to Do It Better

 

Omax3 Ultrapure go to www.tryomax.com/wolf and try a box for free


In This Interview, Will Schwalbe and I Discuss...

  • The Wolf Parable
  • His book, Books for Living, Some Thoughts on Reading, Reflecting and Embracing Life
  • The importance of reading
  • That reading isn't binary
  • That every time we read, we become better at reading
  • How reading can promote empathy
  • How we connect through books
  • The practice of "visiting your books"
  • How he chooses which book to read next
  • The way books can be a bio of your life
  • The primary emotion he has at the beginning of reading a book
  • Live to work vs work to live
  • The freedom to quit
  • The freedom of mediocrity
  • Good being the enemy of great
  • You write the books you need
  • That our devices allow us to rob ourselves of silence
  • How reading is an art
  • The "can't you tell I'm reading" face
  • His favorite books that he's read recently that were written recently

Will Schwalbe Links

Homepage

Twitter

Facebook

 

Please Support The Show with a Donation

 


Psychologists Off The Clock
Psychologists Off The Clock
Diana Hill, Debbie Sorensen, Yael Schonbrun & Jill Stoddard
173. Confidence, Self-Doubt, and Overcoming Limitations with Our New Team Member, Michael Herold
In his TEDx talk, Michael Herold, public speaker, confidence coach, and podcaster extraordinaire, says, “Things you will achieve in your life, you will achieve because of your disability, not in spite of it.” In this week’s episode of Psychologists Off the Clock, Michael talks with Debbie and Yael about confidence, self-doubt, and overcoming limitations. Limitations are all around us. These might be thoughts about how unqualified we are, feelings of anxiety, or even physical disabilities such as spinal muscular atrophy, but Michael Herold has some good news. We can overcome the limitations that come from our own heads, by taking Comfort Zone Challenges! Join us in this episode to learn about how to work with those limitations, instead of against them, to achieve the life you want.  The Psychologists Off the Clock are excited to welcome Michael aboard as our new Strategic Consultant. Join us to for this episode to meet Michael and learn about our new team member!  Listen and Learn How to build confidence and step outside your comfort zone About Michael’s transition from animator to public speaker, coach, and podcaster  Why Acceptance and Commitment Therapy resonates with Michael and how it changed his life  How Michael’s disability, spinal muscular atrophy, has shaped his unique perspective  How you can use values to overcome your limitations About motivational porn and the microaggressions we often use when discussing people who have ‘overcome’ disability-related limitations Why it’s so important to connect with people and how to do that  Inside information on how Coach Michael works to build his clients’ confidence  Tips and tricks from the master himself on how to build your own confidence Resources from this Podcast Episode Michael's TEDx talk  Michael’s website Michael's podcast: The Art of Charm   The Art of Charm Podcast's Episode featuring Michael  The Art of Charm Podcast's Core Confidence Program  Viktor Frankl's Book: Man's Search for Meaning  Michael’s Short Film “When I grow up” All of Michael’s short animated films  Michael Herold   About Michael Herold Early in his life, doctors told Michael Herold’s parents that his severe disability would keep him from living a normal life. The doctors were right. Michael’s life has been anything but normal. In fact, he is quite a renaissance man. For over a decade, Michael was a successful animator for Nickelodeon and worked on a variety of shows including Penguins of Madagascar and Kung Fu Panda. He currently does public speaking around the world and has recently spoken in front of parliament and given a TEDx talk. Michael also uses skills and exercises from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to provide coaching on a variety of life-skills including public speaking, self-doubt, communication, and, primarily, confidence. Visit Michael’s website to find out more!      Episode 91. Disability as a Form of Diversity with Dr. Erin Andrews Episode 169. Microaggressions, Mental Health Disparities, and Racial Trauma with Monnica Williams Episode 102. A Liberated Mind with Dr. Steven Hayes Episode 72. Committed Action with Dr. DJ Moran Episode 32. Social Connection: Exploring Loneliness and Building Intimacy
1 hr 16 min
Good Life Project
Good Life Project
Jonathan Fields / Wondery
Matthew McConaughey | Just Keep Livin'
Five days into filming his first movie - Dazed & Confused - some 28 years ago, Matthew McConaughey’s dad, a towering force in his life, suddenly died. Matthew had to figure out a way to keep showing up, to keep going. His mantra became “just keep livin,” which has become a guiding ethos, a sort of lens through which he lives his life. Now, nearly three decades later, an Academy Award-winning actor, icon in the industry, married father of three, a master raconteur, entrepreneur, philanthropist, and endless creator of moments and adventures, Matthew lives life as an eternal amateur. Fiercely himself in all parts of life, ever-curious and open, he seeks experiences, wisdom, and insights, always learning, always asking, always seeking, that give him some semblance of understanding what makes life worth living.  Much of his journey, his take on life, fatherhood, acting, love, family and contribution is offered up in his beautiful and moving new memoir, Greenlights (https://greenlights.com/). It’s a philosophical and poetic window into the experiences and moments that shaped him and continue to awaken him to what matters most, drawn from 50 years of living, and some 36 years of diaries. That quest - to figure what a life well-lived looks like - is one we both have in common, and it’s probably why in today’s conversation we jump into the deep end of the pool fast, exploring everything from nature and solitude to family, love, struggle, character, uncertainty, creation, the sacred nature of being in the spaces in between devastation and wild success, how the moment we’re all in has shifted his thinking and what the future we all being called to co-create might look like, and so much more. That’s what you’ll hear. But here’s what was happening that you couldn’t see. As we spoke, Matthew sat at his desk, reading glasses on, and pen and paper in hand. Minutes into the conversation, he began writing, taking notes, regularly jotting down ideas, phrases, and insights, piecing together puzzles in real-time. Ever the seeker, a perpetual student of life, present in the moment, and open to whatever it might bring. You can find Matthew McConaughey at: Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/officiallymcconaughey/) Check out offerings & partners:  Plushcare: PlushCare.com/GOODLIFE. Glossier: Glossier.com/podcast/GOODLIFE - 10% off your first order Air Doctor: airdoctorpro.com - code GOODLIFE - 35% off
1 hr 44 min
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
217: Ask David: Is human "worthwhileness" worthwhile? Why am I always the the last to find out about anything? A Daily Gratitude Log, Positive Reframing and more!
Today's Ask David features four terrific questions. * Kevin asks: Why is the concept of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? * Vallejo asks: Does the statement, "WHY AM I ALWAYS THE LAST ONE TO FIND OUT ABOUT ANYTHING?” correspond to overgeneralization, or self-blame? I’ve been listening to the early podcasts on the ten positive and negative cognitive distortions. * David P asks: Do you think there is anything to be gained from a daily gratitude log, to go along with the daily mood log? * Harvey asks: I don’t see how Positive Reframing actually contributes to the therapy. * Kevin asks: Why are the concepts of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? Hi David, I have a quick question about the concept of being a worthwhile human being. Suppose a person believes they are unconditionally worthwhile, what are the implications of this? Why are the concepts of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? Best Regards, Kevin Hi Kevin, Thanks! That’s a very important question. However, it is abstract and philosophical. I have found that philosophical discussions tend to go on endlessly with resolve. In contrast, when someone asks for help with a specific moment when she or he was upset, then I can usually show that person how to change the way she or he is feeling. And when that happens, the person generally suddenly “sees” the solution to some very profound philosophical or spiritual questions. All that being said, I’ll take a crack at it. The goal of TEAM therapy is not to go from thinking that you’re a worthless human being to thinking that you’re a worthwhile human being, but to give up these concepts as nonsensical. Specific activities, talents or thoughts can be more or less worthwhile, but a human being cannot be more or less worthwhile. We can judge specific events, actions, and so forth, but not humans. At least I am not aware of how to validly judge a human being, or a group of humans. We can only judge their actions, attitudes, thoughts, and so forth. Unconditional self-esteem is definitely better than conditional self-esteem, since you don’t have to be perfect or a great achiever or a great anything to be “worthwhile,” but you are still focused on being "worthwhile." I'm not sure what that means, but there is a downside, to my way of thinking. If you think you are worthwhile because you are a human being, does that mean that you are more worthwhile than animals? Lots of people abuse animals, hunt animals, and so forth, which many people find immensely disturbing. These are some of the consequences of thinking that animals are less worthwhile, for example. Not sure that helps, but like your line of questioning! David Kevin follows up: What is the implication then of giving up these concepts at all? I assume that thinking that you have unconditional worthwhileness because you are alive or to drop these concepts entirely have the same emotional implications for people. What are these implications? For example, if I think that worthwhileness and worthlessness are meaningless concepts, so what? What’s the point? What do I gain? Hi Kevin, Let me start by saying, once again, that I am not an evangelist spreading the “gospel,” so to speak. My goal is simply to help people who are struggling with feelings of depression, anxiety, and self-doubt. So, if your way of thinking about things is working for you, there’s no reason to change. But my focus is always on someone who is suffering, and that’s where these concepts can sometimes be important. I can tell you what I gained by giving up the idea that I could be, or needed to be “worthwhile” or “special.” I gained a great deal of joy. It was a lot like escaping from a mental prison. It freed me to find incredible joy in the “ordinary” events of my daily life. It also freed me from fears of “failure” or not being “good enough.” Depression always results from Overgeneralization--you generalize from failing at something specific to thinking you are a failure as a human being. Without Overgeneralization, I think it is safe to say that it is impossible to be depressed. For example, if you measure your worthwhileness based on your achievements and success, you may feel excited when you succeed and devastated or anxious when you fail, or when you are in danger of failing. I'm not sure if this addresses your excellent question! A young woman told herself that she was "unloveable" when she and her boyfriend broke up after two years of going together. Can you see that she thinks she has a "self" that can be "loveable" or "unloveable?" This thought was very disturbing to her, as you might imagine. Relationships do not break up because someone is "unloveable," but because of specific factors or events that drive people apart. Once you zero in on why the relationship failed, or more correctly, why the two of you broke up, then you can pinpoint the causes and learn and grow so you can make your next relationship even better. There are tons of specific reasons why people break up! But if you think that you’re “unloveable,” or tell yourself that the relationship was “a failure,” then you may get stuck in a morass of negative feelings. But it’s not even true that the relationship was a failure.” That’s All-or-Nothing Thinking, since all relationships are a mixture of more or less successful aspects. You could even tell yourself that a “failed” relationship was a partial success, since you successfully learned that this isn’t the person you’re going to spend the rest of your life with. What’s in it for you to give up Overgeneralization and All-or-Nothing Thinking, as well as the concepts of being a “worthwhile” or “worthless” human being? That’s a decision each person can make. There are benefits as well as problems with these ways of thinking. For example, let’s say you’re depressed and think of yourself as “defective.” This is a common negative thought, and it is based on the idea that a human being could be more or less worthwhile, or thinking that your "self" can be judged or rated. So, you could do two Cost-Benefit Analyses. * * First, you could list the advantages and disadvantages of thinking of yourself as a “defective” human being. Then balance the advantages against the disadvantages on a 100-point scale, assigning the larger number to the list that seems more important or desirable. * Second, you could list the advantages and disadvantages of thinking of yourself as a human being with defects, and once again balance the list of advantages against the disadvantages on a 100-point scale. This is just a subtle change in semantics, but the emotional implications can sometimes be pretty powerful. As I mentioned at the top, philosophical debates are just debates. Fun, perhaps, but not terribly useful. I’m more interested in magic, or miracles. That’s what happens at the moment of profound change, which can ONLY happen by focusing on one specific moment when you felt upset and needed help. When you do that, everything becomes radically different, and real change can occur. And at that magic moment of change, the solutions to all of the problems of philosophy will often suddenly become crystal clear. Or, to put it differently, the philosophical debates will suddenly become, without meaning to sound harsh, almost a waste of previous time. Our current semi-feral cat loves my wife, but is only starting to trust me, so I’ve been working at gaining her trust and learning to understand her non-verbal and somewhat complex efforts to communicate. Yesterday she roller over on her back and stretch out her front and back paws to expose her tummy to the max, and she let me pet her tummy for quite a long time, purring loudly the whole time. I don’t car…
1 hr 2 min
Ordinary Vegan Podcast
Ordinary Vegan Podcast
Nancy Montuori
Ordinary Vegan Podcast #91- Turning Your Passion Into A Plant-Based Business Part 2
Is it time to turn your passion for a vegan lifestyle into a plant-based business? What was recently a radical lifestyle choice, eating plants, is now rapidly moving into the mainstream. And if there was ever a time to open a plant-based business, now is the time. According to Meticulous Research, the plant-based food market worth will be 74.2 billion by 2027. Clearly, the growth in this market is due to the nutritional benefits offered by plants and for the sake of the environment. These statistics open a significant opportunity for vegan entrepreneurs. Our podcast guest, Björn Öste, is a seasoned plant-based business owner and entrepreneur. He is co-founder and CEO of Good Idea Drinks. Good Idea is a flavored sparkling water with a blend of five amino acids and chromium that cuts the blood sugar spike after a meal. It's all-natural, un-sweetened, and contains zero calories. Prior to Good Idea, Björn co-founded Oatly. Oatly is one of the most popular non-dairy milks in the world and is sold in over 25 countries. He and his brother Rickard specialize in plant-based food products with preventative properties. In Podcast #91, we speak with plant-based business owner Björn Öste about his entrepreneur journey along with : * Why consumer research is a waste of time * Food as medicine * Working with products that make a real and meaningful difference in people's lives * The science and innovations in food * Raising capital Thanks to Osea Malibu for being today's sponsor. You can receive $10.00 off your order of $50.00 0r more here until December 21, 2020. Additionally, you can find my organic vegan CBD products made from hemp on my website. If you have any questions about how CBD may help you, don't hesitate to reach out to me at questions@ordinaryvegan.net. For recipes and inspiration, follow me on Instagram @ordinaryvegan and join our fun Facebook Group and community. Sign up here, so you don't miss any of Ordinary Vegan's podcasts or recipes. Also, if you get a chance, please write a review on Spotify or Apple Podcasts so our community can grow. I hope today's podcast inspires you to follow your bliss.
43 min
The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
Physicians Committee
Top Turkey Alternatives For Vegan Thanksgiving
These are some of the best options for replacing turkey at Thanksgiving! Dietitians Lee Crosby and Maggie Neola join “The Weight Loss Champion” Chuck Carroll with 10 tasty ideas that will please both longtime vegans and lifelong turkey lovers! What makes this year’s menu truly extraordinary is Lee’s plant-based Turducken recipe — Vegducken! The mouthwatering menu will get you ready to celebrate the healthiest Thanksgiving ever. Plus, Maggie has tips for scaling back Thanksgiving recipes as many of us will be celebrating at home this year due to the pandemic. Also, Dr. Neal Barnard takes a close look at a study that finds vegans and vegetarians are at a higher risk for bone fractures than people who eat meat. He explores why the research showed what it did and what is being overlooked. Dr. Barnard’s conclusions might surprise you! This episode of The Exam Room™ Podcast is sponsored by The Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund, which supports organizations like the Physicians Committee that carry on Greg’s passion and love for animals through rescue efforts, veganism, and wildlife conservation. — — — Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund https://gregoryreiterfund.org — — — Recipes Turkey Alternatives: https://wghtloss.cc/ChuckFacebook PCRM Thanksgiving Guide: https://pcrm.org/thanksgiving — — — Lee Crosby Twitter: @Veggie_Quest IG: @leeatveggiequest Web: https://veggie-quest.com — — — Dr. Neal Barnard Twitter: @drnealbarnard IG: @drnealbarnard Facebook: http://bit.ly/DrBarnardFB — — — Chuck Carroll Twitter: @ChuckCarrollWLC IG: @ChuckCarrollWLC — — — Physicians Committee Twitter: @PCRM IG: @PhysiciansCommittee Facebook: https://wghtloss.cc/PCRMFacebook YouTube: https://bit.ly/PCRMYouTube — — — Barnard Medical Center Telemedicine Schedule Appointment https://bit.ly/BMCtelemed 202-527-7500 — — — Share the Show Please subscribe and give the show a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or many other podcast providers. Don’t forget to share it with a friend for inspiration!
57 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu