The Asset
The Asset
Oct 21, 2020
Threats Foreign and Domestic
50 min

In this very special episode of The Asset, host Max Bergmann introduces a new podcast, Unconventional Threat from The Asset's production team, District Productive and the bi-partisan organization Keep Our Republic.

This is an election year unlike any other in ways that are unsettling and dangerous.

Unconventional Threat brings together exclusive interviews with newsmakers about everything that can happen between now and Inauguration Day, when it's possible we may still not have chosen a President. Journalist Peter Eisner and longtime State Department official Jonathan Winer will outline all the possibilities, including:

  • the use of the military;
  • uncounted ballots; and
  • one scenario where the House of Representatives picks the next President, with each state getting just one vote, no matter who wins the popular vote or leads the Electoral College.


You will hear exclusive interviews with such notable guests as:

  • Former United States Secretary of Homeland Security, Michael Chertoff
  • Senior Vice President of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Heather Conley
  • Chair of the House Committee on Rules Rep. Jim McGovern
  • Ranking Member of the Foreign Relations Committee, Senator Bob Menendez
  • Author of The Plot to Betray America Intelligence analyst Malcolm Nance
  • Former FBI special agent, specializing in counterintelligence investigations, Asha Rangappa
  • Author of Shadow Network: Media, Money, and the Secret Hub of the Radical Right Anne Nelson

Based on hard reporting, facts, and Constitutional Law, this series of 10 podcasts will prepare you for a very possible Unconventional Threat and delineate the steps we can take to come together as a nation to ensure that everyone has the chance to vote, their votes are counted, and the count is respected to create our national choice for President for the next four years.

Listen to the new podcast Unconventional Threat and help @defendourdemocracy2020

Follow us onTwitter @UncoThreat 

Justice Matters with Glenn Kirschner
Justice Matters with Glenn Kirschner
Glenn Kirschner
How the Recent Supreme Court 5-4 Decision in the NY/Religion Case Proves the Need to Add Justices
The recent *Supreme Court* decision, in which the court struck down New York's attempt to limit the size of *religious gatherings* *for public safety reasons*, provides a clear and compelling example of why we must increase the number of Supreme Court justices. We should not be locked in the perpetual battle of decisions that are decided by one justice. When we do that, we are letting one non-elected individual appointed by a partisan president set constitutional policy for 330,000,000 Americans. That is as dangerous as it is foolish. There is *NOTHING i*n the Constitution requiring nine Supreme Court justice. *During our nation's history we have had as few as five and as many as ten justices on the Supreme Court.* The time has come when we should no longer let just one swing justice - not Amy Coney Barrett, not the late Ruth Bader Ginsberg, not any other justice - decide what the Constitution means for 330,000,000 Americans. Here is what should be done to fix a problem we're been enduring for far too long.      *Please consider becoming a #TeamJustice patron at:  https://www.patreon.com/glennkirschner * *My podcast, "Justice Matters with Glenn Kirschner" can be downloaded where you get your podcasts*. Follow me on: *Twitter*:  https://www.twitter.com/glennkirschner2 *Facebook*: https://www.facebook.com/glennkirschner2 *Instagram*: https://www.instagram.com/glennkirschner2 Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/glennkirschner)
16 min
The Mother Jones Podcast
The Mother Jones Podcast
Mother Jones
Will Biden Finally Fix America's Crippling Student Debt Crisis?
Young people turned out in record numbers for the 2020 presidential election, and they overwhelmingly backed Joe Biden. Now, the hashtag #CancelStudentDebt has been trending on Twitter, as intense pressure mounts on the President-elect to finally tackle the $1.7 trillion student debt crisis holding millions of Americans, especially young Americans, hostage to often crippling monthly payments for years to come. “This feels like the closest we’ve ever been,” one education advocate recently told Time, referring to the chance for real policy changes. According to Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) who has established herself as the loudest voice on the matter, large-scale debt forgiveness would provide “the single most effective economic stimulus that is available through executive action.” But how likely is that? Can this finally be fixed? On this week’s episode of the Mother Jones Podcast, we’re revisiting our big investigation by journalist Ryann Liebenthal into America’s broken student debt machine. We first brought you this story in August 2018, detailing the flailing government program known as Public Service Loan Forgiveness, a system that, when Biden was a candidate, he pledged to streamline and reform. “It should be done immediately,” he said, referring to the passage of new legislation. But that depends on who controls the Senate come January, and Biden’s professed urgency must inevitably be tempered with a tough political reality. To bring us up to speed on what’s changed since the campaign and what Biden’s picks for his economic team can tell us about his ambitions, we also chatted to our very own transition tracker, Washington, DC, political reporter Kara Vogt. “The demands for canceling student debt have not ceased since president-elect Joe Biden won in November,” Voght says. “It’s not just the grassroots, not just progressive who are calling for this.” Revisit our original written investigation here.
20 min
The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg
The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg
Chuck Rosenberg, NBC News
Robert S. Mueller III: The Director (Part 1)
Robert S. Mueller III – Bob Mueller – is an American hero. Though best known as the sixth Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and as the Special Counsel that led the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, the story of Bob’s public service starts half a century earlier. Bob was born in Manhattan and raised in Princeton, New Jersey. The oldest of five children, and the only boy, he was a star three sport athlete in high school and excelled in the classroom and on the lacrosse fields of Princeton, where he went to college. Following the death of a Princeton teammate in Vietnam, Bob volunteered for service there. In 1968, after officer training, including graduation from the rigorous Army Ranger School, the Marines deployed Bob to Vietnam. There, as a young second lieutenant, he led a rifle platoon along the Demilitarized Zone. Bob did not fear death in Vietnam – though death was all around him. He feared failure, which meant he had to do all he could to ensure that the young Marines under his command survived the war and made it home. A recipient of the Bronze Star (with valor) and the Purple Heart, Bob returned to the United States after his service in Vietnam and graduated from the University of Virginia School of Law. He became a federal prosecutor in San Francisco, and embarked on a career that would take him to the heights of federal law enforcement in this country, and to the helm of the FBI. My interview with Bob Mueller is in two parts. The first part covers his childhood through his selection as the FBI Director. The second part, which we will publish later this season, picks up where the first interview leaves off – and covers his tenure as Director, guiding the FBI through a difficult and challenging post 9/11 world. I should add a word about what is not in either episode – any detailed discussion of Bob’s work as Special Counsel leading the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Bob was clear when he testified before Congress about this work and his report, and that the report spoke for itself. He did not opine about his findings and does not do so here, either. One of the things I learned while working for Bob Mueller at the FBI is that you take this decent, honorable, and courageous man at his word. Because he is a man of few words, each word matters a lot and so it is worth listening carefully. Bob shares with host Chuck Rosenberg in this first part (of a two-part interview) the story of his service in Vietnam, his time as a new federal prosecutor, and his ascent through the Justice Department to become the FBI Director. This interview with Bob Mueller is the only full one he has given since leaving public life, and it may be the only full one he gives. If you have thoughtful feedback on this episode or others, please email us at theoathpodcast@gmail.com. Find the transcript and all our previous episodes at MSNBC.com/TheOath and read The Mueller Report at https://www.justice.gov/storage/report.pdf
57 min
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