Should This Exist?
Should This Exist?
Oct 28, 2020
Young blood / old brains
30 min

What if you could extend your healthy life by 10 or 20 years – with a blood transfusion from someone younger and healthier than you? Research by Stanford professor Tony Wyss-Coray shows potential to treat Alzheimer’s and prevent age-related cognitive decline: He’s discovered that proteins found in the blood of young mice can dramatically reverse the effects of aging when transfused into older mice. Doing the same thing in humans could increase our quality of life as we age, and our life expectancy too. We’re years away from seeing any clinical applications of this research, which gives us time to ask about its implications. Who will have access to this treatment? Who are the donors providing young blood? We could add years to our lives – but is that what we really want?


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Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People
Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People
Guy Kawasaki
Tim Kendall: Former Facebook Exec, Former President of Pinterest, and Former Wrestler
This episode’s guest is Tim Kendall. In my humble opinion, Tim’s greatest claim to fame is probably that he was an intern who worked for me. That said, since then, Tim has held somewhat important positions at other companies you may have heard of such as Facebook and Pinterest. And he was much more than an intern at both. He is the person who created Facebook’s monetization strategy as the director of monetization. This was way before the current monetization strategy of enabling foreign governments to influence American elections. He was head of product and then president of Pinterest where he made the company “focus.” Lately, he has appeared in the film The Social Dilemma--which you should watch on Netflix if you are concerned about the future of the world, your kids included. He is currently the president of Moment, a company that fosters physical, emotional, and social health by improving people’s relationships with their phones. He is one of the most qualified people in the world to analyze addiction to social media. He has an undergraduate and MBA degree from Stanford. As an undergraduate, he was on the wrestling team. For those of you that don’t know much about collegiate wrestling, let’s just say that it attracts people who are extremely gritty, intelligent, and dedicated. In this sport, there are few externalities or outside factors to blame. It’s you versus your opponent on a mat. And wrestlers know that there’s no lucrative MLB, NFL, NBA contract at the end of the contract but nevertheless they persist. In other words, wrestlers are the kind of people you’d want on your side. This episode is brought to you by reMarkable, the paper tablet. It's my favorite way to take notes, sign contracts, and save all the instruction manuals to all the gadgets I buy. Learn more at remarkable.com I hope you enjoyed this podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes It takes less than sixty seconds, and it really makes a difference in swaying new listeners and upcoming guests. I might read your review on my next episode! Sign up for Guy's weekly email at http://eepurl.com/gL7pvD Connect with Guy on social media: Twitter: twitter.com/guykawasaki Instagram: instagram.com/guykawasaki Facebook: facebook.com/guy LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/guykawasaki/ Read Guy’s books: https://guykawasaki.com/books/ Thank you for listening and sharing this episode with your community.
1 hr 1 min
Gemba Academy Podcast: Lean Manufacturing | Lean Office | Six Sigma | Toyota Kata | Productivity | Leadership
Gemba Academy Podcast: Lean Manufacturing | Lean Office | Six Sigma | Toyota Kata | Productivity | Leadership
Ron Pereira: Lean Thinker & Co-Founder of Gemba Academy
GA 347 | Leveraging Deliberate Practice with Billy Taylor
This week's guest is Billy Taylor. Formerly the Director of Manufacturing at Goodyear, Billy has an impressive amount of lean knowledge. From the value of diversity, to performance maps, to deliberate practice, you won't want to miss this one. A MP3 audio version of this episode is available for download here. In this episode you'll learn:  Billy's favorite quote (4:01) Billy's background (4:39) A story about the Fayetteville plant (9:30) Why Billy decided to start LinkedXL (12:11) What makes LinkedXL's approach different (14:48) The gap Billy has identified (17:09) Billy's advice for lower level lean practitioners (20:15) Key methods for creating performance maps (24:23) The value of diversity (26:18) Measuring non-quantifiable attributes (29:55) How the team ran the live stream using deliberate practice (33:47) Some examples of deliberate practice (37:54) Podcast Resources Right Click to Download this Podcast as an MP3 Download a Free Audio Book at Audible.com GA 258 | Creating a Common Meaning with Billy Taylor LinkedXL Billy on LinkedIn Subscribe & Never Miss New Episodes! Click to Subscribe in iTunes If you enjoyed this podcast please be sure to subscribe on iTunes. Once you're a subscriber all new episodes will be downloaded to your iTunes account and smartphone. The easiest way for iPhone users to listen to the show is via the free, and incredible, Podcast app.  NEW! You can now follow the podcast on Spotify here.  You can also subscribe via Stitcher which is definitely Android friendly. What Do You Think? Share a story about a time you used deliberate practice to prepare for something.
44 min
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
Melina Palmer
128. How to Build Products That Create Change, An Interview with Matt Wallaert
Today I am so excited to introduce you to Matt Wallaert, author of Start at the End: How to Build Products that Create Change. One of my favorite quotes from Matt is one that shows how we are kindred spirits. He says, “If behavior is your outcome and science your process, you’re a behavioral scientist. No Ph.D. required.” Matt was one of the first behavioral scientists to leave academia to work in industry, which he has done for over 15 years now. He was head of behavioral science at Microsoft, the first chief behavioral officer in the healthcare industry while at Clover Health, and has done tons of awesome projects along the way (some of which you will learn about in today’s episode). During our conversation, we discuss lots of concepts that have past episodes on the show, including those on anchoring, relativity, how to finally change your behavior, how to experiment, and many more Show Notes: * [00:43] Today I am so excited to introduce you to Matt Wallaert, author of Start at the End: How to Build Products that Create Change. * [03:28] Matt shares his story and how he got interested in behavioral science. * [05:06] After taking a second psychology class in college, he became addicted to science and started doing a lot of applied work. * [07:56] He left Clover Health in March and ended up moving to California for a year of adventure. * [09:41] He has decided in his next role that he wants to spend most of his time pivoting an organization to behavioral science. * [11:01] Advances in data science and user research have prepared younger project managers to fully embrace behavioral science. * [13:12] People often don’t think of the implications of the things that they say. * [13:30] Every industry has its own beliefs about what can’t be changed (listen to episode 126 for Melina’s tips on fixing this in your organization). * [14:51] Behavioral science can be used in good ways and in bad ways (ethics matter!). * [16:49] It is really hard to write a complete behavioral statement from the beginning. * [17:17] Matt shares about the GetRaised project he worked on. * [19:04] Bias creeps in when we start to do ratings of performance. * [20:28] The difference between junior behavioral scientists and more senior behavioral scientists is just experience. Anyone can learn the framework. * [22:08] A lot of communication is just quick analogy making. It is the ability to find out what someone is interested in and relate that to the thing you are teaching. * [24:37] Our brain is using the same rules and concepts whether we are deciding to litter or choosing a brand of toothpaste. * [25:37] When you try to replicate a lab study in real life sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t. The key is that you tried it small before you shared it with everybody. (Get Melina’s tips for creating your own experiments in episode 63.) * [26:47] Science is the testing of all assumptions. Diversity can help identify an assumption. * [28:08] Behavioral science is a lifestyle. * [28:59] Academic behavioral science is about the why of the way things are. Applied behavioral science is the changing of the way things are. * [30:20] Almost all misunderstandings across cultural and other kinds of borders are due to a misunderstanding of the pressures that affect that other persons’ life. It almost always makes sense if you understand the context. * [32:06] Melina shares Steve Wendel’s story about a fish in the sand (hear more from Steve in episode 116). * [34:33] It is easier to have a discussion with the people that we can relate to than to have a more difficult conversation. * [35:36] Matt says, “If behavior is your outcome and science your process, you’re a behavioral scientist. No Ph.D. required.” * [36:27] Behavioral science thrives when lots of people are doing it and doing it a little better every day. If it does not put behavior as an outcome, it is not behavioral science. * [37:05] Behavioral science is about creating a specific outcome in advance and then using science as a process. * [39:46] Get your own copy of Matt’s book, Start at the End: How to Build Products that Create Change. * [42:32] Don’t forget to take advantage of the year-end sale going on now. Thanks for listening. Don’t forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show. Let’s connect: * Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com * The Brainy Business® on Facebook * The Brainy Business on Twitter * The Brainy Business on Instagram * The Brainy Business on LinkedIn * Melina on LinkedIn * The Brainy Business on Youtube More from The Brainy Business: * Master Your Mindset Mini-Course * BE Thoughtful Revolution - use code BRAINY to save 10% * Get Your FREE ebook * Melina’s John Mayer Pandora Station! Listen to what she listens to while working. * Special Year-End Sale 👈🏻🥳 Past Episodes and Other Important Links: * Matt’s Website * Start at the End: How to Build Products That Create Change * Getraised * Matt on Twitter * Interview with Dan Ariely * Interview with Kwame Christian * Relativity * How to Finally Change Your Behavior (So it Sticks) * Biases Toward Novelty and Stories * How To Set Up Your Own Experiments * Anchoring & Adjustment * Change Management * Loss Aversion * Framing * Bikeshedding * Network Effect * Interview with Steve Wendel
44 min
Behavioral Grooves Podcast
Behavioral Grooves Podcast
Kurt Nelson, PhD and Tim Houlihan
Cornelia Walther on POZE: Pause, Observe, Zoom in, and Experience
Cornelia Walther has spent most of her professional career with the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the World Food Program (WFP). She was the head of communications in large-scale emergencies in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Caribbean. She earned her PhD in Law and is a certified yoga instructor and her current work is a remarkable amalgam of her studies and her life’s journey. In recent years, she developed POZE as a way of exploring the world to help uncover deeper levels of happiness. (POZE is an opening spiral that can stand for, among a few things, to Pause for a moment, Observe what’s going on around you, Zoom in on yourself, and Experience what is going on in the world.) These are wise and weighty thoughts and we thoroughly enjoyed our conversation with her. We also discussed how we are all interconnected – that your world and my world may be very different, yet we share connections if we only give ourselves the chance to experience them. The hope is that we recognize this connectedness – both at a personal level and at a larger global level – and bring greater meaning and happiness to our lives through this connectedness. One of our favorite lines from our discussion with Cornelia was this: “So driven was I by the craving for some thing or another, that I omitted to savor the beauty of now.” We all need to take a moment, pause, and savor the beauty of now. © 2020 Behavioral Grooves Links Cornelia Walther: https://www.linkedin.com/in/corneliawalther/?originalSubdomain=ht POZE: https://www.springernature.com/gp/researchers/the-source/blog/blogposts-communicating-research/sdg-interview-cornelia-walther-sustainability-holistic-perspect/17463138 Gary Latham, PhD, Episode 147: https://behavioralgrooves.com/episode/gary-latham-phd-goal-setting-prompts-priming-and-skepticism/ Creole Language: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creole_language Brad Shuck, PhD, Episode 91: https://behavioralgrooves.com/episode/brad-shuck-being-ignored-is-worse-than-having-a-stapler-thrown-at-you/ Development, Humanitarian Aid and Social Welfare. Social Change from the Inside Out (May 2020): https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9783030426095#aboutBook Humanitarian Work, Social Change, and Human behavior. Compassion for Change (June 2020):https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9783030458775 Development and Connection in times of Covid. Corona’s Call for Conscious Choices (October 2020): https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-030-53641-1 Social Change from the Inside Out. From Fixation to Foundation. From Competition to Change: https://rdcu.be/b9GrF From Individual wellbeing to collective welfare: https://rb.gy/xsuauh Musical Links Pink “So What”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJfFZqTlWrQ Verdi, “Aida”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3w4I-KElxQ Dvorak, “Symphony of the New World”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_1N6_O254g Beatles, “Don’t Let Me Down”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NCtzkaL2t_Y&list=PLf9cCqxaRfcMcL5yU9UZDdNJwkDNbh3ce Depeche Mode, “People Are People”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1FVmBHbPNg Mariza, “Quem Me Dera”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sze5rpbklM Ayub Ogada, “Kothbiro”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L48PCisRZ7s Giberto Gil: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECtYYiHbIcQ Fabiano do Nascimento, “Nana”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M4iukkBmDGg Tim Sparks, “Klezmer Medley”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DkiCFzWTYRg
1 hr 13 min
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
Could Trump Take the Economy Down With Him? & Can Presidents "Make or Break" a Market?
The United States 2020 Presidential election has been called by pretty much every organization that covers the event in any capacity and while the final decision is not made until the special club that is the electoral college has presented its final decision, it’s apparent that Joe Biden will be the next president of the united states.  This is the first time in almost 3 decades that an incumbent president has been voted out before serving a second term and it has come in the midst of national and global catastrophes galore.  To add fuel to a fire that threatens to ignite the global economy, the outgoing president has been vehemently challenging the results which is casting doubt over the smoothness of the transition, the continuation of much-needed government support, and the foundation of the nation’s systems in their entirety.  And this all begs the question, either unwittingly or maliciously, how much damage could a president do to the American economy, and by extension the global economy.  There are checks and balances in place to control the influence of any one man in the united states around things that were relevant when those checks and balances were been written. But it must be remembered economies back then depended a lot more on successful harvests, and a lot less on tweets.  Our modern economies are incredibly complex and incredibly fine-tuned, but complex fine-tuned things tend to be very easy to break, and the outcomes of throwing a proverbial spanner into the works could be just as devastating.  Thousands of people die when unemployment rises, and many more could lose access to healthcare, housing and livelihoods during even a minor period of economic turbulence. All of this is to say that a president waging war on an economy could be just as dangerous as waging war on a nation.  * What kind of influence does a president directly have over an economy? * Do they deserve the credit for things going well? * And what could a president do to tank the economy if they really wanted to?
15 min
The Working With... Podcast
The Working With... Podcast
Carl Pullein
My 2021 Challenge For You
This week, in a rather special episode I am going to set you a challenge that if you accept, will guarantee to transform your life in terms of your health, your fitness and your mental and physical toughness. You can subscribe to this podcast on: Podbean | Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | TUNEIN Links: Email Me | Twitter | Facebook | Website | Linkedin Get the FREE Annual Planning Sheet Get the Evernote Annual Planning Sheet Create Your Own Apple Productivity System Carl’s Time Sector System Blog Post The FREE Beginners Guide To Building Your Own COD System Carl Pullein Learning Centre Carl’s YouTube Channel Carl Pullein Coaching Programmes The Working With… Podcast Previous episodes page Script Episode 160 Hello and welcome to episode 160 of the Working With Podcast. A podcast to answer all your questions about productivity, time management, self-development and goal planning. My name is Carl Pullein and I am your host for this show. So, what am I talking about? I want to challenge you to commit to running and completing a full marathon in 2021. Why? As I will explain in a moment, marathon running teaches you life lessons that will benefit you in so many different ways. From improving your health, managing your weight to showing you that you are capable of doing something you previously thought was impossible or that you didn’t have enough time to do. I’ve heard all the excuses, and so I want to show you in this episode that no matter where you are fitness-wise, you can take this challenge and completely change your lifestyle. Now before I explain this to you, I just want to give you a heads up that my Create Your Own Apple productivity course has been updated and is available on my Learning Centre. While this year has not seen many functional changes to the apps you use, there has been a few changes to the way iCloud Drive works and I have also included how to set up the Time Sector System using only Apple’s productivity apps. So, if you only want to use the built-in apps that Apple provide for free and want the peace of mind using built-in apps bring you, then this is a course for you. Now, if you are already enrolled in the course, this is a free update for you, and if you are new to the Apple ecosystem and want to create a simple to use intuitive productivity system, then this course is for you. Full details of the course are in the show notes. Okay, no mystery podcast voice this week just me explaining why you should get yourself involved in the challenge. So, how does running a marathon transform your life? Well. Firstly, no matter what fitness level you have right now, to run 26 miles or 42 kilometres requires practice, or as we call it training. You are not going to be able to decide to run a marathon today and go out on Sunday and run 26 miles. Marathon running does not work like that. To complete a marathon requires a period of about six to ten months of consistent training. You have to go out and run five to six times per week, every week for six to ten months. There is no getting around that and you cannot take any short cuts. Because you are committing to training that many times per week you have to plan your training. If you have a busy week, where are you going to fit in your training runs? When you go on holiday, how will you continue your training? What will you do when the inevitable injuries happen—and they will—how will you maintain your fitness? All of these factors need careful consideration. Plus, if you are over the age of 35 and have not exercised for a number of years, you will need to visit your doctor for a medical check-up. Marathon running puts a huge strain on your physical body and you need to make sure your heart and lungs are capable of going through the effort you will have to put yourself through. Okay, so there are the challenges before you start. How does running a marathon help your productivity and your self-development? The first, and in my opinion the most important, is it develops your self-discipline. Life is too easy for most of us today. We live in an incredibly convenient world. You’re sat down on the sofa binge-watching The Crown on Netflix and you feel hungry, all you need do is open your phone go to your local pizza takeaway app and order your favourite pizza and within 30 minutes you have a hot steaming plate of delicious pizza in your lap. With the exception of answering the door, you hardly needed to move. Total calories expended—about 40. Your pizza will contain at least 1,200 calories and watching TV will amount to less than 100 calories. But, when you know you need to get in your daily run, you have to pull yourself up, get off that sofa and go out and run. No excuses. To do that requires a huge amount of self-discipline and effort. When it’s pouring down with rain, the temperature has plummeted into the minuses (less than 30 degrees Fahrenheit) and the wind is blowing a gale, the determination and self-discipline required to put on your running shoes and go outside is massive. That kind of mental training prepares you to achieve anything. It teaches you to push through no matter how hard—or boring— something is. And you learn that to achieve anything takes consistent effort over a period of time. Secondly, marathon running moves you away from the pernicious instant gratification trap many of us have fallen in to. The last twenty years or so has been fantastic. Technology has transformed almost everything we do. Sadly, the drawback to this is we expect everything to come to us at the push of a button. I remember when you ordered something by mail order, at the bottom of every order was the notice “please allow 28 days for delivery” and we were absolutely fine with that. Today, if you live in the right area, you can order something online at 8 PM and it will be sat outside your door when you wake up the following morning. Nobody is prepared to wait 28 days for their delivery today. I can order a box of food from the UK using the fantastic site, The British Corner Shop, and that box will be delivered half-way around the world here in Korea within three to four days. Something that was impossible just fifteen years ago. But with that instant service has come an expectation of instant gratification, yet great things take time to develop. Completing a marathon might not change the world, but it will change your world. The time and effort you put into preparing shows you that by taking consistent steps five to six times per week you move yourself bit by bit to a successful outcome. And that is how great businesses are built. It’s how amazing careers are developed and it’s how you build a successful life. None of these can be achieved at the push of a button. To achieve any kind of success takes time, effort and consistency. You have to push through the difficulties, you have to learn how to deal with adversity and you have to learn to stay focused on the outcome. Marathon running does that. To finish your marathon, you need time, you need consistency and you need to put in the effort. Another lesson marathon running teaches you is that Google, Facebook and books can only take you so far. You will never complete a marathon by just planning and researching, At some point, you have to get outside and run. You can plan and research as much as you like, but that will never prepare you for a marathon. The only way you can prepare for a marathon is to get outside and run. Too often I come across people who tell me they want to start a blog or begin a podcast but first they must… You fill in the blank. There’s always more research to do, there’s always something else they must do before they start their blog or podcast. No! Research and thinking will never create a blog or podcast. Only by recording or writing content will you create a blog or podcast. Doing. Doing the hard work of sitting down in front of a screen…
13 min
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