Still Processing
Still Processing
Feb 8, 2018
We Don't Know Where We Are
Play • 38 min

This week, we take the Oscar-nominated film "Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri" as a starting point for a discussion about a new sense of placelessness in film and TV. Over the last year, we've been seeing stories set in ambiguous spaces--the limbo between heaven and hell, distorted models of our world, towns that look like no place we recognize as American. We talk about "The Good Place," "Westworld," "Downsizing," and the Sunken Place from "Get Out" to try and figure out how we lost a sense of where we are. Then we look to shows like "Atlanta" and "The Chi" to think about how we might find our way back.


Discussed This Week:

“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)

“Grownish” (Freeform)

“Riverdale” (The CW)

Hot Topic "Riverdale" Merchandise

“Dennis Edwards, Former Temptations Lead Singer, Dies at 74” (Daniel E. Slotnik, The New York Times)

"Don’t Look Any Further" (Dennis Edwards)

"'Three Billboards’ Production Designer Inbal Weinberg on Martin McDonagh’s Unique Approach To Screen Language" (Matt Grobar, Deadline)

“The Good Place” (NBC)

“Stranger Things” (Netflix)

“Coco” (Pixar)

“Black Mirror” (Netflix)

“Get Out” (Universal Pictures)

“Dunkirk” (Warner Bros.)

“Downsizing” (Paramount Pictures)

“Westworld” (HBO)

"Instravel - A Photogenic Mass Tourism Experience" (Oliver KMIA, Vimeo)

“Singin’ in the Rain” (MGM)

“Queen Sugar” (OWN)

“Atlanta” (FX Networks)

“Insecure” (HBO)

“Black-ish” (ABC)

“The Chi” (Showtime)

“Moonlight” (A24)

“Black Panther” (Marvel Studios)

"Space and Place: The Perspective of Experience" (Yi-Fu Tuan, 1977)

"Place and Placelessness" (Edward Relph, 1976)

Super Bowl LII Commercials

“Ram Trucks Commercial with Martin Luther King Jr. Sermon is Criticized” (Sapna Maheshwari, The New York Times)

2018 Kia Stinger - Steven Tyler Big Game Ad - Feel Something Again

Blacture Super Bowl Ad

Amazon Alexa Loses Her Voice - Super Bowl LII Commercial

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes
Paul Holdengräber, dublab Radio, Onassis Foundation LA
The Quarantine Tapes 150: Katrina vander Heuvel
On episode 150 of The Quarantine Tapes, guest host Walter Mosley is joined by Katrina vanden Heuvel. Editor and former publisher of The Nation, Katrina joins Walter for a discussion on optimism, politics, and change in the immediate aftermath of the January 6th events at the Capitol. Walter and Katrina talk about the Georgia elections and the change in the South. They also dig into the velocity of debate on social media, the need for understanding, and the U.S.’s role in the world. Katrina touches on the importance of balancing optimism and realism and the need for more joy on the left. Katrina vanden Heuvel is editorial director and publisher of The Nation, America’s leading source of progressive politics and culture. A frequent commentator on U.S. and international politics for ABC, MSNBC, CNN and PBS, her articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times and The Boston Globe and she writes a weekly column for The Washington Post. Vanden Heuvel is also the author of several books, including The Change I Believe In: Fighting for Progress in The Age of Obama. Vanden Heuvel has been recognized for her journalism and public service by organizations as diverse as Planned Parenthood, the National Women's Political Caucus, the New York Civil Liberties Union, the Center for Community Change, the Norman Mailer Center, the Eleanor Roosevelt Center at Val-Kill, American Rights at Work, Progressive Congress, and more. During her tenure, The Nation's journalism has been recognized for excellence by the National Magazine Awards, the Society of Professional Journalists, GLAAD, the National Association of Black Journalists, and the Webby Awards, among others. Vanden Heuvel serves on the boards of The Institute for Policy Studies, The Campaign for America's Future, The Roosevelt Institute, The Women’s Media Center, and The Sidney Hillman Media Foundation. Walter Mosley is one of the most versatile and admired writers in America. He is the author of more than 60 critically-acclaimed books including the just released Elements of Fiction, a nonfiction book about the art of writing fiction; the novel John Woman,Down the River and Unto the Sea (which won an Edgar Award for “Best Novel”) and the bestselling mystery series featuring “Easy Rawlins.” His work has been translated into 25 languages and includes literary fiction, science fiction, political monographs, and a young adult novel. His short fiction has been widely published, and his nonfiction has appeared in the New York Times and The Nation, among other publications. He is also a writer and an executive producer on the John Singleton FX show, “Snowfall.” In 2013 he was inducted into the New York State Writers Hall of Fame, and he is the winner of numerous awards, including an O. Henry Award, The Mystery Writers of America’s Grand Master Award, a Grammy®, and PEN America’s Lifetime Achievement Award.
30 min
Art Juice: A podcast for artists, creatives and art lovers
Art Juice: A podcast for artists, creatives and art lovers
Louise Fletcher/Alice Sheridan
How to Sell Art Online [104]
This week, we answer a listener question from Maxine, who asked about the best ways to sell art online. This is a huge topic and perhaps a little ambitious for a one-hour episode, but we decided to give it our best shot! In a wide-ranging discussion, we discuss the importance of a website and email list as a "home base" for your marketing, so that no matter where people find you, they can sign up to stay in touch. But we also cover other options and ways to get started if you don't yet have a website, including social media, licensing opportunities and third party websites such as Saatchi Art.  And we stress that even when you do have a website, it's not enough to just set it up and then wait for people to arrive. You will always need to drive traffic to your site and finding ways to do this is an important element of your marketing strategy. Mentioned Louise's Art Tribe membership group is currently accepting new members. Join for a free trial month at: https://thispaintinglife.mykajabi.com/art-tribe Find us and sign up for our newsletters at: www.alicesheridan.com www.louisefletcherart.com Submit a question at bit.ly/artjuicepodcast Support the podcast with a small donation at: https://ko-fi.com/artjuice Follow us on Instagram: Alice @alicesheridanstudio Louise @louisefletcher_art Credits "Monkeys Spinning Monkeys" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
58 min
Next Question with Katie Couric
Next Question with Katie Couric
iHeartRadio
TURNOUT Episode 10: ‘If we raise our expectations we would have a better system’
This series began in the past, to better understand the origin and history of our ongoing fight for voting rights. And as Turnout comes to a close, we consider its future. Where do we go from here? What lessons can we take with us, and what impact might this election have on our ongoing push for a more inclusive democracy and a more perfect union. In this last episode of Turnout with Katie Couric, we hear from some of our previous guests — including Wendy Weiser, Gilda Daniels, and Tyler Okeke — about the biggest takeaways from the 2020 election and their impact on our democracy. But first, an interview with someone whose job it is to lay a civics foundation for the next generation of voters. Greg Cruey is a middle school social studies teacher in War, West Virginia — a one-time coal mining center that is now one of the poorest areas in the country. Because Mr. Cruey explains our voting system, our elections, and our democracy to his 6th, 7th, and 8th graders each year, we wanted to hear how he might put our 2020 experience into context. Read more about the people and organizations mentioned in this episode: What it’s like to teach children about the election, and its results, in deep-red Trump country, by Hanna Natanson (Washington Post) Wendy Weiser is the Vice President for Democracy at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law School Gilda Daniels is an associate professor at the University of Baltimore School of Law, as well as litigation director at Advancement Project national office and author of ‘Uncounted: The Crisis of Voter Suppression in America.’ Tyler Okeke is a Vote at 16 Youth Organizer with Power California and a second-year student at the University of Chicago. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
34 min
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