Still Processing
Still Processing
Oct 29, 2020
'Waiter, There's a Fly in Our Bubble'
Play • 37 min

With a monumental election on the horizon, we want to bring up a few recent events that show some sort of truth amid the confusion. From the NBA bubble to the fly in Mike Pence’s hair to HBO's “Lovecraft Country”, these are moments that point us beyond the present, to be our best and greatest selves.


Discussed this week:


And The Writer Is...with Ross Golan
And The Writer Is...with Ross Golan
Big Deal Music // Mega House Music
Ep. 113: Luke Combs
Hailed as “the most promising and influential new country star of the last five years" by The New York Times, he is a multi-platinum, ACM, CMA, CMT, and Billboard Music Award-winning artist from Asheville, NC. His new deluxe album, What You See Ain't Always What You Get, recently debuted at #1 on the all-genre Billboard 200 chart as well as Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart. It also set the new weekly streaming record for a country album with 102.26 million on-demand streams, breaking his own record, which was set last November with the release of his platinum-certified, global #1 album, What You See Is What You Get. The new deluxe album features all 18 tracks from What You See Is What You Get as well as five new songs including “Forever After All,” which debuted at #2 on the all-genre Billboard Hot 100 chart—the highest entrance ever for a male country solo artist. Adding to a series of groundbreaking and historic years, Combs recently made history as the first artist ever to have their first two studio albums spend 25 weeks or more at #1 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart—breaking Taylor Swift’s previously held record at 24 weeks. The achievement comes as What You See Is What You Get topped the chart for the 25th time, while his 2017 debut, This One’s For You, has spent 50 non-consecutive weeks at #1—tying the record for the longest reign atop the chart. Moreover, Combs recently won two awards at the 55th ACM Awards, three awards at the 2020 Billboard Music Awards, and two awards at the 54th CMA Awards. Continuing his triumphant run at country radio, Combs’ recent single, “Lovin’ On You,” spent multiple weeks at #1 on both the Mediabase/Country Aircheck chart and the Billboard Country Airplay chart. This is Combs’ ninth-consecutive #1 single—a first on Billboard’s Country Airplay chart—as well as his eighth single to spend multiple weeks at #1. His current single, “Better Together,” is already top 10 at country radio and rising. And The Writer Is… Luke Combs! Artwork: Michael Richey White   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
55 min
All the Books!
All the Books!
Book Riot
E294: New Releases and More for January 19, 2021
This week, Liberty and Tirzah discuss The Rib King, Last Night at the Telegraph Club, Remote Control, and more great books. Pick up an All the Books! 200th episode commemorative item here. Subscribe to All the Books! using RSS, iTunes, or Spotify and never miss a book. Sign up for the weekly New Books! newsletter for even more new book news. This post contains affiliate links. When you buy through these links, Book Riot may earn a commission. BOOKS DISCUSSED ON THE SHOW: The Rib King: A Novel by Ladee Hubbard Last Night at the Telegraph Club by Malinda Lo Remote Control by Nnedi Okorafor  Amari and the Night Brothers by B. B. Alston Knock Knock by Anders Roslund   This Will Be Funny Someday by Katie Henry Floaters: Poems by Martín Espada Winterkeep by Kristin Cashore The Album of Dr. Moreau by Daryl Gregory WHAT WE’RE READING: The Survivors by Jane Harper The Hidden Palace: A Tale of the Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker MORE BOOKS OUT THIS WEEK: Have I Ever Told You Black Lives Matter by Shani King Pianos and Flowers: Brief Encounters of the Romantic Kind by Alexander McCall Smith  Bad Medicine: Catching New York’s Deadliest Pill Pusher by Charlotte Bismuth Homo Irrealis: Essays by André Aciman  Faust, Part One : A New Translation with Illustrations by Johann Wolfgang van Goethe, Zsuzsanna Ozsváth (translator) The Forever Sea by Joshua Phillip Johnson From the Moon I Watched Her by Emily English Medley Cast in Firelight by Dana Swift Maafa by Harmony Holiday The Plague Cycle: The Unending War Between Humanity and Infectious Disease by Charles Kenny Wench by Maxine Kaplan     Harnessing Grief: A Mother’s Quest for Meaning and Miracles by Maria J. Kefalas Enjoy the View by Sarah Morgenthaler Before She Disappeared: A Novel by Lisa Gardner The Conjure-Man Dies by Rudolph Fisher The City of Tears by Kate Mosse Your Corner Dark by Desmond Hall The Comeback: A Figure Skating Novel by E. L. Shen Ambitious Girl by Meena Harris and Marissa Valdez The Mask of Mirrors by M. A. Carrick Happy Singles Day by Ann Marie Walker The Black Panther Party: A Graphic Novel History by David F. Walker, Marcus Kwame Anderson With Her Fist Raised: Dorothy Pitman Hughes and the Transformative Power of Black Community Activism by Laura L. Lovett Hall of Smoke by H. M. Long Girl on the Line by Faith Gardner The Crown in Crisis: Countdown to the Abdication by Alexander Larman  The World Turned Upside Down: A History of the Chinese Cultural Revolution by Yang Jisheng, Stacy Mosher (translator), Guo Jian (translator)   Shipped by Angie Hockman  A Brief History of Artificial Intelligence: What It Is, Where We Are, and Where We Are Going by Michael Wooldridge  Wider Than the Sky by Katherine Field Rothschild Sonic Boom: The Impossible Rise of Warner Bros. Records, from Hendrix to Fleetwood Mac to Madonna to Prince by Peter Ames Carlin  The Broken Spine (A Beloved Bookroom Mystery Book 1) by Dorothy St. James  Craft in the Real World: Rethinking Fiction Writing and Workshopping by Matthew Salesses Eagle Down: The Last Special Forces Fighting the Forever War by Jessica Donati  The Doctors Blackwell: How Two Pioneering Sisters Brought Medicine to Women and Women to Medicine by Janice P. Nimura  Borderlands Curanderos: The Worlds of Santa Teresa Urrea and Don Pedrito Jaramillo by Jennifer Koshatka Seman Shiver by Allie Reynolds A House at the Bottom of a Lake by Josh Malerman Sanctuary: A Memoir by Emily Rapp Black The Divines: A Novel by Ellie Eaton The Merciful by Jon Sealy  Reel Bay: A Cinematic Essay by Jana Larson Trio by William Boyd The African Lookbook: A Visual History of 100 Years of African Women by Catherine E. McKinley The Lives of Lucian Freud: Fame, 1968-2011 by William Feaver At the Edge of the Haight by Katherine Seligman Playing with Fire by April Henry If I Tell You the Truth by Jasmin Kaur Pity Party by Kathleen Lane A Complicated Love Story Set in Space by Shaun David Hutchinson From Here to There: Inventions That Changed the Way the World Moves by Vivian Kirkfield and Gilbert Ford My Grandmother’s Braid by Alina Bronsky, Tim Mohr (translator)  Last Orgy of the Divine Hermit by Mark Leyner Infinitum: An Afrofuturist Tale by Tim Fielder We Free the Stars (Sands of Arawiya) by Hafsah Faizal  Aftershock: A Novel by T.J. Mitchell, Judy Melinek Coming Out Stories: Personal Experiences of Coming Out from Across the LGBTQ+ Spectrum edited by Emma Goswell and Sam Walker See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
45 min
Intersectionality Matters!
Intersectionality Matters!
African American Policy Forum
31. #TruthBeTold: The Destructiveness of Trump's Equity Gag Order & What Biden Must Do Now
In this episode, Kimberlé is joined by a panel of scholars and civil rights leaders to explore the impact of the Trump administration’s “Equity Gag Order,” and the president’s crusade against racial justice and gender equity. The conversation includes insights from leaders of the National Fair Housing Alliance and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund about how the Equity Gag Order’s list of “prohibited concepts” has impaired their work, as well as a discussion of the importance of narrative and storytelling and how the Trump administration has engaged in historical revisionism in their attacks on racial. As the panelists explore how we can fight back against the Equity Gag Order and how to pressure the Biden administration to rescind it on day one, they also place the order in historical context as part of a long tradition of state repression of civil rights movements. With:
 CAROL ANDERSON - Professor of African American Studies, Emery; Author, White Rage
 RACHEL GODSIL - Professor of Law, Rutgers; Co-Founder, Perception Institute LAURA GOMEZ - Endowed Chair at UCLA Law; Professor in Sociology, Chicana & Chicano studies
 CHARLES R. LAWRENCE III - Professor, William S. Richardson School of Law; Critical Race Theory pioneer
 JANAI NELSON - Associate Director-Counsel, NAACP Legal Defense Fund (LDF) 
LISA RICE - President and CEO, National Fair Housing Alliance Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)
 Produced by Julia Sharpe-Levine 
Edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine and Rebecca Scheckman
 Additional support provided by the African American Policy Forum
 Music by Blue Dot Sessions
 Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast
1 hr 13 min
Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala
Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala
TED
A Black Utopia In North Carolina
“I thought I'd come to paradise,” said Jane Ball Groom upon arriving in Soul City, North Carolina. It wasn’t amenities or location that made Soul City paradise, but the promise of what it could be: a city built by Black people, for Black people. Our guests take us back to 1969 when the city was founded and built from (below) the ground up — and while the city itself was short-lived, we’ll see how the seeds it sowed laid roots for spaces that celebrate and center Black culture today. That's a wrap on the season! Share you stand out moments with host Saleem Reshamwala on Twitter (@Kidethic). For photos from the episode and more on the history of Soul City, head to the Souvenir Book of Soul City in the North Carolina digital collections. Special thanks to Shirlette Ammons who we could not do this story without, and our guests Charmaine McKissick-Melton, Jane Ball-Groom, Lianndra Davis, Lou Myers, Tobias Rose, and Derrick Beasley. Extra special thank you to Alan Thompson, who recorded the saxophone music you heard in this episode from Parish Street on Durham’s Black Wall Street. Our unsung hero for this week is Sammy Case who manages the cross-promotions for all of TED's podcasts - if you found Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala from one of your other favorite shows, she’s the reason why! Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala is produced by Jesse Baker and Eric Nuzum of Magnificent Noise for TED. Our host is Saleem Reshamwala. Our production staff includes Hiwote Getaneh, Sabrina Farhi, Kim Nederveen Pieterse, Elyse Blennerhassett, Angela Cheng, and Michelle Quint, with the guidance of Roxanne Hai Lash and Colin Helms. Our fact-checker is Abbey White. This episode was mixed and sound designed by Kristin Mueller. We're doing a survey! If you have a minute, please take it at surveynerds.com/farflung. It really helps make the show better.
57 min
writing class radio
writing class radio
andrea askowitz and allison langer
Brave Listener Gets Hard Edits
We asked you, our listeners, to send in your unfinished essays. We didn’t mean first drafts. We meant those essays you’ve been working on forever that you can’t get to the bottom of. Today on our show, we bring you an unfinished essay by listener Julie Schoelzel, a writer from Keene, New Hampshire. We hope to offer Julie insights into figuring out what she’s come to say and how to finish her essay.  In every class, of every essay, we ask: What is the story about? After several drafts, we hope the narrator can answer this question because every scene and every detail must lead the reader/listener to that conclusion.  Thank you Julie Schoelzel for being brave and sharing your story. Writing Class Radio is co-hosted by Allison Langer (www.allisonlanger.com) and Andrea Askowitz (www.andreaaskowitz.com). This episode of Writing Class Radio is produced by Virginia Lora, Andrea Askowitz and Allison Langer. Mia Pennekamp is our media specialist. Theme music is by Amadians.  There’s more writing class on our website (www.writingclassradio.com), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/writingclassradio/), Instagram and Twitter (@wrtgclassradio). If you love the lessons you get on each episode, you can get them ALL in one place--our three-part video series--for $50. Click Video Classes on our website. If you want to be a part of the movement that helps people better understand each other through storytelling, follow us on Patreon. For $10/month Andrea will answer all your publishing questions. For $25/month you can join Allison’s First Draft weekly writers group, where you can write and share your work. Go to www.Patreon.com/writingclassradio.
21 min
Next Question with Katie Couric
Next Question with Katie Couric
iHeartRadio
TURNOUT Episode 10: ‘If we raise our expectations we would have a better system’
This series began in the past, to better understand the origin and history of our ongoing fight for voting rights. And as Turnout comes to a close, we consider its future. Where do we go from here? What lessons can we take with us, and what impact might this election have on our ongoing push for a more inclusive democracy and a more perfect union. In this last episode of Turnout with Katie Couric, we hear from some of our previous guests — including Wendy Weiser, Gilda Daniels, and Tyler Okeke — about the biggest takeaways from the 2020 election and their impact on our democracy. But first, an interview with someone whose job it is to lay a civics foundation for the next generation of voters. Greg Cruey is a middle school social studies teacher in War, West Virginia — a one-time coal mining center that is now one of the poorest areas in the country. Because Mr. Cruey explains our voting system, our elections, and our democracy to his 6th, 7th, and 8th graders each year, we wanted to hear how he might put our 2020 experience into context. Read more about the people and organizations mentioned in this episode: What it’s like to teach children about the election, and its results, in deep-red Trump country, by Hanna Natanson (Washington Post) Wendy Weiser is the Vice President for Democracy at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law School Gilda Daniels is an associate professor at the University of Baltimore School of Law, as well as litigation director at Advancement Project national office and author of ‘Uncounted: The Crisis of Voter Suppression in America.’ Tyler Okeke is a Vote at 16 Youth Organizer with Power California and a second-year student at the University of Chicago. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
34 min
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