Meditative Story
Meditative Story
Sep 2, 2020
That thing I'm missing is what makes me happy, by Jennifer 8. Lee
Play episode · 22 min

When a years-long relationship ends, author and filmmaker Jennifer 8. Lee makes the startling discovery that she lacks an inner monologue – a voice inside articulating thoughts and feelings, reflecting on the past and planning for her future. At first she feels inadequate, as if she's missing a "sense" that everyone has but her. But the more she talks with others, the more she wonders if its absence may just be a blessing in disguise.

Read the transcript for this story: https://meditativestory.com/jennifer-8-lee/

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Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
213: From Feeling Good to Feeling Great!
In today’s podcast, we discuss a few of the many differences between Feeling Good, my first book, and my new book, Feeling Great, which was just released. We also discuss some of the differences between the cognitive therapy that I launched in Feeling Good, and the powerful new TEAM therapy that I feature in Feeling Great. I wrote Feeling Great because there’s been a radical and enormous evolution of the treatment methods and theories in the 40 years that have elapsed since I first published Feeling Good in 1980. I now have many more techniques than I had then, and there’s been with a radical development in my understanding of the causes of depression. I also have new ideas about the most effective treatment techniques, based on my clinical experience since I wrote Feeling Good (more than 40,000 hours treating individuals with severe depression and anxiety), as well as fresh insights about what's important, and what's not, based on four decades of my research on how psychotherapy really works. Rhonda asks many questions about the unique features of TEAM including the new T = Testing techniques, the new E = Empathy techniques, the A = Assessment of Resistance techniques, as well as the M = Methods. Rhonda is particularly curious about the four “Great Deaths” of the therapist’s ego in TEAM therapy, which correspond to the four TEAM components of TEAM, as well as the four “Great Deaths” of the patient’s ego, which correspond to recovery from depression, anxiety, relationship problems, and habits and addictions. One of the goals of TEAM is not simply the complete and rapid elimination of the symptoms of depression and anxiety, but the development of personal enlightenment and the experience of great joy and a deeper appreciation of life. Toward the end of the podcast, David tearfully talks about the life of his hero, Ludwig Wittgenstein, who is viewed by many as the greatest philosopher of all time, and David, a philosophy major when he was a student at Amherst College, would definitely agree with this assessment. But Wittgenstein was very lonely, and prone to depression, because very few people understood his ground-breaking contributions when he was still alive. In fact, it was thought that only five or six people in the world “got it.” Part of the problem is that what he was saying was so basic and obvious that most people just could grasp it, or the extraordinarily profound implications of his work. His depression and loneliness, sadly, perhaps also resulted from the fact that he was gay, and living at a time when this was far less acceptable than it is today. He never published anything when he was alive, because when he was depressed, he thought he'd made no meaningful or enduring contributions. However, his remarkable book, Philosophical Investigations was published in 1950, following his death, and was soon regarded as the greatest book in the history of philosophy. Because of that book, David gave up his goal of a career in philosophy, since Wittgenstein wanted all of his students to give up philosophy and do something practical instead. So that’s what I did! My only regret is never having the chance to meet Wittgenstein and tell him, “I got it!” and thank him for his incredible contributions. If you want to learn more, check out the short read by his favorite student, Norman Malcolm, who wrote “Ludwig Wittgenstein: A Memoir.” I cry like a baby every time I read the book, and tears come to my eyes when I even look at the book, which is proudly displayed in my office. If you ever visit me at home, make sure you check out the book. I feel so fortunate to be able to work with Rhonda and bring my message to so many of you every week. Thank you for your support! [Note from Rhonda: I feel extremely honored to work with David and be a part of bringing David's message, and the TEAM therapy model to our listeners!] David and Rhonda
53 min
Psychologists Off The Clock
Psychologists Off The Clock
Diana Hill, Debbie Sorensen, Yael Schonbrun & Jill Stoddard
169. Microaggressions, Mental Health Disparities, and Racial Trauma with Monnica Williams
Microaggressions. These small, often unintentional acts of racism are probably affecting you more than you know! In this week’s podcast episode, Dr. Monnica Williams, author of Managing Microaggressions: Addressing Everyday Racism in Therapeutic Spaces and co-author of Eliminating Race-Based Mental Health Disparities: Promoting Equity and Culturally Responsive Care across Settings, and our co-host Debbie discuss microaggressions in therapy spaces, race-based mental health disparities, and racial trauma. Join us for an informative episode, where we can grow and learn together! "Good people can and do commit acts of racism."Dr. Monnica Williams Listen and Learn: What microaggressions are and why they’re so pervasiveThe different categories of microaggressions How microaggressions have affected Debbie and Dr. Williams personally How self-identity impacts the occurrence and aftermath of microaggressionsHow subtle, covert microaggressions impact race-based Mental Health treatment disparityThe psychological impact of microaggressions and racial traumaDr. Monnica Williams’s recommendations for the mistakes therapists make in therapyDr. Monnica-approved methods for pointing out, apologizing for, and validating the experience of microaggressions if you commit one (as we all do sometimes!)  Resources Mentioned on the Podcast: Link to our sponsorship pageFollow Dr. Monnica on Twitter: @DrMonnica Visit Dr. Monnica’s website: http://www.monnicawilliams.com Dr. Monnica’s blog on psychology today: Culturally SpeakingDr. Monnica’s book: Eliminating Race-Based Mental Health Disparities: Promoting Equity and Culturally Responsive Care across Settings Dr. Monnica’s book: Managing Microaggressions: Addressing Everyday Racism in Therapeutic Spaces About Monnica Williams: Dr. Monnica Williams is a board-certified, licensed clinical psychologist, specializing in cognitive-behavioral therapies. She is an Associate Professor in the School of Psychology at the University of Ottawa, Canada Research Chair in Mental Health Disparities, and Director of the Laboratory for Culture and Mental Health Disparities. She is also the Clinical Director of the Behavioral Wellness Clinic, LLC in Tolland, Connecticut, and she has founded clinics in Kentucky, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. Dr. Williams completed her undergraduate studies at MIT and UCLA. She received her doctoral degree in clinical psychology from the University of Virginia. She was an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry for four years, where she worked with Dr. Edna Foa who is a world renowned expert on OCD and PTSD. She was also a director of the Center for Mental Health Disparities at the University of Louisville.  Dr. Williams has published over 100 peer reviewed articles, books, chapters, and scientific reports with a focus on anxiety related conditions and cultural considerations. She was named one of the top 25 thought leaders in PTSD by PTSD Journal, and she frequently contributes to the public scientific discourse as a media expert. She is frequently featured on PBS, NPR, and the New York times, and she has a fantastic blog on psychology today called Culturally Speaking. Along with Daniel Rosen and Johnathan Kanter, Dr. Monnica co-authored the book Eliminating Race-Based Mental Health Disparities: Promoting Equity and Culturally Responsive Care across Settings. In this episode, we discussed her most recent book, Managing Microaggressions: Addressing Everyday Racism in Therapeutic Spaces. You can learn more about all of Dr. Williams’ work here. Related Psychologists Off the Clock Podcast Episodes: Episode 162. APA Guidelines on Race and Ethnicity in Psychology with Dr. Karen SuyemotoEpisode 156. The Psychology of Radical Healing CollectiveEpisode 150. Immigrant and Refugee Mental Health with Dr. Sandra MattarEpisode 96. Effective Conversations About Diversity Issues with Drs.
57 min
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