Meditative Story
Meditative Story
Nov 18, 2020
Stories of new beginnings
Play • 31 min

As we transition into a new season, and look forward to a new year ahead, we’re sharing these five short stories of people in motion. Listen for stories of birth, creative rebirth, and stories of starting over. Because the human spirit can continually find a new way to begin again. Featuring stories from writer and midwife Elizabeth Lesser, cowboy poet Waddie Mitchell, country singer/songwriter Mickey Guyton, musician Andrew Bird, and the Reverend Otis Moss III.

Look forward to Season 3 of Meditative Story, coming in early December with all-new stories and storytellers.

Subscribe to the Meditative Story newsletter at http://eepurl.com/gyDGgD.

Psychologists Off The Clock
Psychologists Off The Clock
Diana Hill, Debbie Sorensen, Yael Schonbrun & Jill Stoddard
#181 Stop Avoiding Stuff with Matt Boone
Show notes: In today’s world, it’s easy to stay on-the-go. Sometimes, on-the-go behaviors are necessary and functional. But often we engage in these behaviors to avoid discomfort. In this episode of Psychologists Off the Clock, Jill and Matt Boone, co-author of Stop Avoiding Stuff, discuss avoidant behavior and how to address it with skills from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Make a committed action and join us in this episode to learn more about what you might be avoiding and how to respond instead! Listen and Learn: Jill and Debbie’s personal encounters with “doom scrolling” and other behaviors that feel good in the moment but cost us in the long-run Matt’s breakdown of what his book, Stop Avoiding Stuff, is about and how you can benefit from it Why Matt decided to write about avoidance in a digestible (bathroom-book) format About Matt’s professional understanding of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy  Other places where Matt can train you in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy How to effectively use your understanding of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to practice the skills in Matt's book  Why Matt’s accessible explanations of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy are particularly useful right now The inside-scoop on what’s inside Matt's book   Practical advice on how to identify and become more mindful of your own avoidant behaviors  Exercises for practicing awareness and willingness right now!  How Matt came to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and what role it plays in his personal life Resources: Matt’s book, Stop Avoiding Stuff: 25 Microskills to Face Your Fears and Do It Anyway, and the editor of Mindfulness and Acceptance in Social Work  Jill’s books, Be Mighty and The Big Book of ACT Metaphors  Matt’s webinar on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy  Sign up for POTC’s First Annual Wise Minds Summit: How to Adapt and Thrive in Today’s Challenging Times About Matt Boone: Matt Boone is a social worker, psychotherapist, and public speaker who specializes in translating mental health concepts for the general public. He is the co-author, with Jennifer Gregg and Lisa Coyne, of Stop Avoiding Stuff: 25 Microskills to Face Your Fears and Do It Anyway, and the editor of Mindfulness and Acceptance in Social Work. He is the director of programming and outreach at the student mental health services of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, where he’s an instructor in psychiatry.  At Lyra Health, a mental health tech startup, he led the clinical development of Lyra’s mental health coaching program and gave talks on subjects like stress and stigma to audiences at Facebook, Uber, and Genentech. At Cornell University, he oversaw the development of Let's Talk, an outreach program to underserved students that has since been replicated at nearly 100 colleges and universities.   He is an Association of Contextual Behavioral Science peer-reviewed acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) trainer and a former consultant for the VA ACT for Depression training rollout. He regularly provides ACT trainings for professionals and the general public.  He lives in Little Rock with his wife, cat, and guitars, and he loves talking about mental health with people who think psychotherapy and self-help are a bit cringy. Find out more about Matt on his website, matthewsboone.com.    Related Episodes: Episode 180. Choosing to Live Your Values with Benji Schoendorff Episode 121. Be Mighty: An Episode for Stressed Out, Worried Women with Dr. Jill Stoddard Episode 116. Building a Meaningful, Values-based Life with Dr. Jenna LeJeune Episode 102. A Liberated Mind with Dr. Steven Hayes      Episode 72. Committed Action with Dr. DJ Moran
56 min
Go Help Yourself: A Comedy Self-Help Podcast to Make Life Suck Less
Go Help Yourself: A Comedy Self-Help Podcast to Make Life Suck Less
Misty Stinnett & Lisa Linke
Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle by Emily Nagoski, Ph.D. & Amelia Nagoski, D.M.A.
This week, Misty and Lisa review the New York Times bestseller Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle by Emily Nagoski, Ph.D. & Amelia Nagoski, D.M.A. Emily Nagoski has a Ph.D. in Health Behavior with a minor in Human Sexuality from Indiana University, and a MS in Counseling, also from IU, including a clinical internship at the Kinsey Institute Sexual Health Clinic. She has been a sex educator for twenty-five years and is the author of the NYT bestseller Come As You Are: The Surprising New Science that Will Transform Your Sex Life. She lives in western Massachusetts with a strange cat, two dogs, and a cartoonist. Dr. Amelia Nagoski is a conductor and music professor, in which jobs her responsibilities include running around waving her arms and making funny noises, and generally doing whatever it takes to help singers get in touch with their internal experience. Her students have described her as "passionate, positive, and boundlessly enthusiastic." In her teaching, performing, and writing, she focuses on connections between art and the experience of being alive in the world, with the expectation that understanding music can help us understand ourselves and each other. She is the identical twin sister of Emily Nagoski, PhD. We cover the main ideas from each part of the book in this Burnout book review summary podcast, including: Part 1: What You Take with You Part 2: The Real Enemy Part 3: Wax On, Wax off If you'd like to learn more about the authors, you can do so at their website here. If you'd like to buy the book, you can do that here! To listen to our episode reviewing Emily Nagoski's first book Come As You Are, click here! You can also listen to our episodes reviewing For the Love of Men Part 1 and Part 2. If you'd like to support the podcast, you can do that on our Patreon. To get your GHY swag, check out our merch store! Thank you for supporting Go Help Yourself!
58 min
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
226: The “Great Death” in a Corporate / Institutional Setting
We have not had the chance to do a really good podcast on the Five Secrets of Effective Communication recently, so Rhonda and I jumped at the chance to do a podcast with a local executive we will call “Valentina” who is facing a severe challenge. How can she respond effectively to a ton of her colleagues who responded critically and angrily to one her first emails since being place in a top leadership role at work? They said that her email was harsh and accusatory, and sounded adversarial and provocative, and didn’t give a feeling of partnership or appreciation for all the hard work they were doing. Yikes! That’s pretty tough. And yet, my philosophy—in therapy, in family conflicts, and in work settings as well—is that your worst failure can often be your greatest opportunity in disguise. Is this true? Or just pie in the sky? Rhonda and I do a lot of role-playing and role reversals to (hopefully) show Valentina how to transform a humiliating professional failure into an enormous success. We’ll let you know how it works after we get some feedback from Valentina. We are both deeply indebted to Valentina for her courage in allowing us to talk about a problem that most of us encounter from time to time. I often receive harsh criticism, so I know how anxiety provoking it can be, especially when the criticisms come from authority figures! Valentina was wonderful to work with, and said she felt happiness and a sense of peace at the end of the podcast. It was great to see that! Let us know what you think about today’s podcast, and your own philosophy of how to respond to criticism skillfully and effectively. We alluded to, but did not delve deeply, into the opposite philosophy of arguing, defending yourself, and never apologizing. We’ve seen a lot of that in the past year on the evening news every day. Did the approach we modeled on today’s show seem inspiring and awesome? Or foolish and self-defeating? Thanks for listening! We hope you enjoyed today’s podcast and maybe learned something useful. For more information on the Five Secrets of Effective Communication, you can check out my book, Feeling Good Together, available in paperback on Amazon. Warmly, David and Rhonda
56 min
Education Bookcast
Education Bookcast
Stanislaw Pstrokonski
103. What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy by James Paul Gee
What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy is a book that I read early in my education research quest. At the time, I thought that it had interesting points to make, but I was unclear on quite how to react to it. After several more years of reading and research, it's clear to me that this book is deeply flawed. First of all, the author redefines "literacy" in a very strange way. He takes any form of semiotic system to count as a "type" of literacy. So, for example, if you know how to use a smartphone, then you are "literate" in the layout, symbols, and conventions of smartphone user interface. This is obviously not the kind of literacy that most people are interested on or concerned about, and it is less valuable than "conventional" literacy, partly because of barrier to entry (learning to read is relatively hard, learning to use a phone is relatively easy) and partly because of utility. Secondly, he coins a lot of new terminology for no apparent reason. During the recording I've had to translate some of his terms into more ordinary language, including the usual technical terms rather than his special ones. His terminology only serves to obscure his message and make it seem as if there is more content here than there really is. Finally, and most importantly, his central point is misguided. He essentially says that learning a subject is mostly about socially getting on in that world - knowing how to get on with other artists, mathematicians, surgeons, or whatever other skill "community", depending on the domain. However, this completely overlooks the glaring difference in difficulty between getting to know social conventions and attitudes of a subculture and learning the requisite knowledge and skills in order to be useful and productive in that domain, let alone to actually understand what is being said by other practitioners. The former takes a matter of weeks or months of acculturation, and the latter years or even decades of dedication. If we focus on the social context of knowledge rather than the knowledge itself, to coin a phrase, it would be like making beautiful light fittings for a house that you haven't built - pointless in the absence of the larger task that is left undone. Enjoy the episode. *** RELATED EPISODES Cognitive science (general): 19. Seven Myths about Education by Daisy Christodoulou; 52. How We Learn by Benedict Carey; 79. What Learning Is; 80. The Chimp Paradox by Steve Peters; 81a. The Myth of Learning Styles; 81b. on the Expertise Reversal Effect; 82. Memorable Teaching by Pepps McCrea; 85. Why Don't Students Like School? by Dan Willingham; 86. Learning as information compression Cognitive science (literacy-related): 41. What Reading Does for the Mind by Keith Stanovich and Annie Cunningham; 91. Vocabulary Development by Steven Stahl; 93. Closing the Vocabulary Gap by Alex Quigley; 95. The Reading Mind by Dan Willingham Expertise: 20. Genius Explained by Michael Howe; 22. The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle; 24. Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell; 49. The Art of Learning by Josh Waitzkin; 97. The Polymath by Waqas Ahmed; 98. Range by David Epstein Games and play (including computer games): 34. Reality is Broken by Jane McGonigal; 35. Minds on Fire by Mark Carnes; 36. Fun, Play, and Games; 37. A Theory of Fun for Game Design by Raph Koster Other fads / critical reviews: 42. Do Schools Kill Creativity by Sir Ken Robinson; 53. Brain-based Learning by Eric Jensen; 59, 60 on Brain Training; 62. Brainstorming makes you less creative; 65. Beyond the Hole in the Wall (on Sugata Mitra); 71. Visible Learning by John Hattie; 81. on Learning Styles; 87. Experiential Learning; 88. The Failure of Constructivist, Discovery, Problem-Based, Experiential, and Inquiry-Based Teaching
1 hr 30 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu