Mohsin Hamid with Paul Smith
Play • 40 min

‘Exit West’ was chosen by Barack Obama as one of his favourite books of last year. The author Mohsin Hamid, joins Paul Smith in the Penguin studio, and has chosen five objects that have inspired his book. They include a book by C.S. Lewis, a photograph of a bomb blast in Lahore taken by his sister and a CD by Gilberto Gil and Jorge Ben. Mohsin is a two time Booker prize nominee and his novel ‘The Reluctant Fundamentalist’ was made into a major motion picture starring Riz Ahmed and Kate Hudson. #PenguinPodcast

 

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The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes
Paul Holdengräber, dublab Radio, Onassis Foundation LA
The Quarantine Tapes 165: Sanford Biggers
On episode 165 of The Quarantine Tapes, guest host Imani Perry is joined by Sanford Biggers. Sanford is an artist working across a wide range of disciplines. He talks with Imani about some of his recent work with quilting, describing how he came to that medium and talking about the cultural and historical elements of that work. Imani asks Sanford about his beginnings in art and about the range of his work, from sculpture to music to textiles. Sanford offers a brilliant view into his process as an artist, talking about creating pieces that speak to police brutality, remixing classical European and African art, and the kinship between hip hop and quilting. Sanford Biggers’ work is an interplay of narrative, perspective and history that speaks to current social, political and economic happenings while also examining the contexts that bore them. His diverse practice positions him as a collaborator with the past through explorations of often overlooked cultural and political narratives from American history. Working with antique quilts that echo rumors of their use as signposts on the Underground Railroad, he engages these legends and contributes to this narrative by drawing and painting directly onto them. In response to ongoing occurrences of police brutality against Black Americans, Biggers’ BAM series is composed of bronze sculptures recast from fragments of wooden African statues that have been anonymized through dipping in wax and then ballistically ‘resculpted’. Following a residency as a 2017 American Academy Fellow in Rome, the artist recently began working in marble. Drawing on and playing with the tradition of working in this medium, Biggers creates hybridized forms that transpose, combine and juxtapose classical and historical subjects to create alternative meanings and produce what he calls “future ethnographies”. As creative director and keyboardist, he fronts Moon Medicin, a multimedia concept band that straddles visual art and music with performances staged against a backdrop of curated sound effects and video. Moon Medicin performed at Open Spaces Kansas City in October 2018 and at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. in 2019.
32 min
The Fantastic History Of Food
The Fantastic History Of Food
Nick Charlie Key
23 - The Nazi's Exploding Chocolate Bar
Food inherently is meant to sustain life, but this has not always been the case, in fact, for as far back as history goes food has also been used as a vehicle, not for invigorating life, but for delivering death. In this episode, we’re looking at some of the most bizarre moments in which food was involved in assassination plots throughout history.  . In an extra special segment in today's episode, my friend Moxie LaBouche from the podcast Your Brain On Facts takes us through some of the more creative assassination attempts on the late Cuban revolutionary leader Fidel Castro. ------------------- Please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/foodhistorypod and get early access to episodes, bonus content and even free merch! Find transcripts and references on the website: www.foodhistorypodcast.com ------------------- Huge thanks also go to Kind Bar for sponsoring this episode. KIND is working hard to shift the food industry and empower their community and our listeners to make better, informed choices about their health. Kindness can be a transformative force for good and that is why we are teaming up with KIND and PODGO to bring our listeners between 10% and 15% off for military, teachers, students, first responders, doctors and nurses in a time where they have given so much to all of us. Go to www.podgo.co/kind Kind Bar, creating a kinder and healthier world - one act, one snack at a time -------------------
19 min
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library
Shakespeare in the Harlem Renaissance
When you think about the Harlem Renaissance, theater might not be the first thing that comes to mind. But, says Dr. Freda Scott Giles, theater played a significant role in the blossoming of Black American arts and culture of the 1920s and '30s. Of course, because there’s little in the English-language theater untouched by Shakespeare, he was present in the Harlem Renaissance too. Banner Shakespeare productions included Orson Welles’s hit “Voodoo” "Macbeth," produced by the Federal Theater Project, and the "Midsummer"-inspired "Swingin’ the Dream," which was a Broadway flop despite the talents of musician Louis Armstrong and comedian Moms Mabley. We talk to Dr. Giles about how the artists and thinkers of the Harlem Renaissance regarded the Bard. Plus, we visit the African Company of the 1820s and the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s to learn about more than a century of Black responses to Shakespeare. Freda Scott Giles is Associate Professor Emerita of Theater at the University of Georgia. She was a contributor to three books: "Tarell Alvin McCraney: Theater, Performance, and Collaboration," published in 2020; "Constructions of Race in Southern Theatre: From Federalism to the Federal Theatre Project," published in 2003; and "American Mixed Race: The Culture of Microdiversity," which was published in 1995. From the Shakespeare Unlimited podcast. Published February 16, 2021. © Folger Shakespeare Library. All rights reserved. This podcast episode, “I Here Engage My Words,” was produced by Richard Paul. Garland Scott is the associate producer. It was edited by Gail Kern Paster. Ben Lauer is the web producer, with help from Leonor Fernandez. We had technical help from Andrew Feliciano and Paul Luke at Voice Trax West in Studio City, California.
34 min
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