Ben Macintyre with Nihal Arthanayake
45 min

Author and historian Ben Macintyre talks to Nihal about his new book ‘Agent Sonya’ - the story of the greatest female spy of the 20th Century. 


Ben chats to Nihal about how ‘Sonya’s’ gender helped her stay under deep cover for so many years. Ben’s inspirational objects include a jar of chutney given to him from M15 and the jaw-dropping story of his great uncle’s pocketbook (which literally saved his life). #PenguinPodcast


‘Agent Sonya’ is available to buy as an audiobook now - https://apple.co/32NX94J 

 

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Woman's Hour: Daily Podcasts
Woman's Hour: Daily Podcasts
BBC
Women and underpaid state pensions, Women's emotional labour at Christmas, Female footballers and dementia
It was found that thousands of married women could have been receiving underpaid state pensions. The Department of Work and Pensions has since been investigating its records and making payments. The former pensions Minister Steve Webb, who first highlighted the issue, believes that many more women, such as divorced and widowed women could be effected, and that the DWP could be looking at a bill in excess of £100 million. We speak to Steve Webb and to financial expert Jasmine Birtles about pension planning, and the impact coronavirus could have on future pensions. The Sage Christmas document says that 'women carry the burden of creating and maintaining family traditions and activities at Christmas'. “Messaging should be supportive of women adapting traditions and encouraging those around them to share the burden and to be supportive of any alterations to adapt for Covid-19 restrictions.” We speak to the behavioural scientist Dr Pragya Agarwal. We catch up with Pip Hare who is currently competing in the Vendee Globe solo round the world sailing race. It is considered to be one of the toughest sporting competitions: 24,000 miles as the crow flies, no help, no stops and no turning back. Are women footballers more at risk of dementia than men? Dr Michael Grey is a neuroscientist who is running a project at the UEA to monitor ex-footballers for early signs of dementia. He’s looking for more women to take part. He joins Jane along with footballer and former Crystal Palace player Freya Holdaway. The Duchess of Cambridge’s new report on children’s early years has revealed the struggle many parents face – from feeling lonely and struggling to find time for themselves, to feeling judged by other parents. How have those problems persisted through the pandemic? Ipsos Mori’s Kelly Beaver and Dr Guddi Singh join us to discuss the report and give some practical advice. Presenter: Jane Garvey Producer: Dianne McGregor
53 min
Talk Art
Talk Art
Russell Tovey and Robert Diament
Lauren Weedman
For the final episode of Season 7, Russell & Robert meet Lauren Weedman, best known for her standout role as Doris on HBO's television series Looking (alongside Russell!). As well as being a leading actress and comedian (not comedienne - as we discuss!!!!!!), one of her longterm passions is painting and making art. On her instagram @ThisOneIsTitled, started during lockdown, Weedman revealed 'The Quarantine Series' of unique figurative paintings, which she sells from $200 via Instagram and have become incredibly popular with collectors all over the world! As a self taught artist, including series where she makes one new work a day, we consider her link to Outsider and Outlier artworks but also explore her wide ranging artistic influences including Laura Owens, Tim Burton, David Lynch but primarily Edvard Munch and Van Gogh, whose authentic and emotional-charged works became even more important during her time spent living in Amsterdam. We also discover her love of London's very own National Portrait Gallery, in particular an installation she saw there of William Blake's death mask! Plus we introduce Lauren to the work of Grayson Perry and his recent 'Art Club' TV series which focused on ideas of creativity and the processes behind making art. Check out Lauren's paintings at her official website: www.LaurenWeedmanStudio.com which includes very cool videos of her discussing individual artworks! Follow Lauren's two Instagram accounts: @Lauren_Weedman and her art page @ThisOneIsTitled. You can watch Lauren & Russell in HBO's 'Looking' on Netflix, Amazon Prime or all good streaming services. Thanks for listening to Season 7! We will return on 4th December 2020 with a brand new Season 8, so fear not, we have another art-thrill-ride lined up for you!!! For images of all artworks discussed in this episode visit @TalkArt. Talk Art theme music by Jack Northover @JackNorthoverMusic courtesy of HowlTown.com We've just joined Twitter too @TalkArt. If you've enjoyed this episode PLEASE leave us your feedback and maybe 5 stars if we're worthy in the Apple Podcast store. Thank you for listening to Talk Art, we will be back very soon. For all requests, please email talkart@independenttalent.com   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
1 hr 12 min
Literary Friction
Literary Friction
Literary Friction
Literary Friction - The Political Essay with Otegha Uwagba
Does the written word really have the power to change things? How do you make a good argument in writing? Does the form of the essay lend itself particularly well to politics? Join us as we talk to the writer Otegha Uwagba about her brilliant essay Whites, a clear sighted, powerful comment on race in our society which examines her feelings in the wake of George Floyd’s murder, and the failures of white allyship. Picking up from our discussion of the form of the essay with Brian Dillon in 2017, we’ll be exploring the strengths and limitations of the form and talking about our favourite political essayists, from George Orwell to James Baldwin to Rebecca Solnit, plus all the usual recommendations. Our recommended political essays: Octavia: Daddy Issues by Katherine Angel https://peninsulapress.co.uk/product/daddy-issues Carrie: On Witness and Repair by Jesmyn Ward https://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2020/08/jesmyn-ward-on-husbands-death-and-grief-during-covid General Recommendations: Octavia: A Very Easy Death by Simone de Beauvoir https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/10378/a-very-easy-death-by-simone-de-beauvoir/ Otegha: America Is Not the Heart by Elaine Castillo https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/549486/america-is-not-the-heart-by-elaine-castillo/ Carrie: Intimations by Zadie Smith https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/321/321775/intimations/9780241492383.html Email us: litfriction@gmail.com Tweet us & find us on Instagram: @litfriction
1 hr
The Book Club Review
The Book Club Review
The Book Club Review
81. The Memory Police by Yoko Ogawa
We discuss The Memory Police, a haunting dystopian novel that explores questions of power, trauma and state surveillance written by Yoko Ogawa, one of Japan's leading contemporary novelists. Set on an unnamed island, the narrator of The Memory Police describes how every so often something in the inhabitants' lives will disappear. Birds, roses, books, one by one these things vanish overnight and the next day people wake up to find they have lost the memory of them. The Memory Police then arrive to enforce the disappearance, rounding up and destroying all evidence of the disappeared thing. They are also on the hunt for those few members of the population who have the ability to retain their memories, something hard to disguise. These people too must disappear, but what happens to them? The narrator tries to save her friend, R, by hiding him in a concealed room. But as more and more things disappear it starts to become unclear what she is saving him for. An uncomfortable read that provoked mixed feelings among Laura's book group, but which, on reflection, we think could have been one of the best book club books we have ever done. Listen in to hear more, why Yoko Ogawa is the Georgette Heyer of Japan, and how Laura is about to become a disappeared thing herself. Plus our recommendations for your next book club read. Books mentioned on the show: Piranesi by Susanna Clarke, Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, Never Let Me Go and The Unconsoled by Kazuo Ishiguro, We by Yevgeny Zamyatin and The Happy Reader magazine. Find full show notes, plus our archive of over 80 episodes, book reviews and articles on our new website: thebookclubreview.co.uk
36 min
The Great Women Artists
The Great Women Artists
Katy Hessel
Griselda Pollock on Alina Szapocznikow
In episode 50 (!!!) of The Great Women Artists Podcast, Katy Hessel interviews the legendary, trailblazing, feminist art history ICON, GRISELDA POLLOCK on the pioneering Polish Jewish artist, Alina Szapocznikow.  [This episode is brought to you by Alighieri jewellery: www.alighieri.co.uk | use the code TGWA at checkout for 10% off!] Author, editor, curator, and Professor, Griselda Pollock's 43-year-plus career as an art historian is nothing short of LEGENDARY. Having co-authored (with Rozsika Parker), “Old Mistresses: Women, Art and Ideology”, written 26 books, and edited many more, Pollock's indefatigable career has seen her spend decades developing an international, queer, postcolonial, feminist analysis of art’s diverse histories. Writing extensively on artists Eva Hesse, Lubaina Himid, Georgia O’Keeffe, to Tracey Emin, Pollock has curated numerous museum exhibitions, made several films, and has two forthcoming publications out for release.  But the reason why we are speaking to Griselda today is because as well as being a social and feminist historian of  19th and 20th century and contemporary art she is also a transdisciplinary cultural analyst focussing in Cultural Studies and Jewish studies, which is where her fantastic, tireless work on the great sculptor, Alina Szapocznikow comes into play. Born in Poland to an intellectual Jewish family of doctors in 1926, Alina Szapocznikow survived internment in concentration camps during the Holocaust as a teenager. [TW: we discuss The Holocaust]. At her liberation in 1945, she moved first to Prague, and then to Paris, where she studied sculpture and took up a job at a stonemasons, and then was forced back to Poland in 1951 after suffering from tuberculosis. When the Polish government loosened controls over creative freedom following Stalin’s death in 1952, Szapocznikow moved into figurative abstraction and then a pioneering form of representation. By the 1960s, she was radically re-conceptualizing sculpture as an intimate record not only of her memory, but also of her own body. First casting parts of the body as fragments, on her return to Paris as part of 'Nouveau Realisme', she began to move into casting bulbous shapes cast in resin from human bellies, lipstick red lips, nipples and lips growing from slender stems like flowers and serving as lamps. Surrounded by an artistic community that included Niki de Saint Phalle and more, in this episode we discuss Szapocznikow's incredible life and career, her involvement in the evolution of new materials and new ways of thinking, whilst simultaneously trying to deal with the horrors of the past – as with her American contemporaries, Eva Hesse, Louise Bourgeois, and Hannah Wilke.  AS's Self Portrait: https://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/2012/alina-szapocznikow-sculpture-undone-1955-1972 Photosculptures (chewing gum): https://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/2012/alina-szapocznikow-sculpture-undone-1955-1972 Lamp works: https://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/2012/alina-szapocznikow-sculpture-undone-1955-1972 Tumour series: https://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/2012/alina-szapocznikow-sculpture-undone-1955-1972 Further images and information: https://www.hauserwirth.com/artists/16711-alina-szapocznikow?modal=media-player&mediaType=artwork&mediaId=16719 Follow us: Katy Hessel: @thegreatwomenartists / @katy.hessel Sound editing by Laura Hendry  Artwork by @thisisaliceskinner Music by Ben Wetherfield https://www.thegreatwomenartists.com/
56 min
The Art Angle
The Art Angle
Artnet News
Re-air: The Rise and Fall of Anne Geddes, Queen of Baby Photography
The Art Angle team is taking this week off for Thanksgiving, but we thought we'd share one of our favorite episodes from the past year to see you through this unconventional holiday weekend. Picture this: a doughy, apple-cheeked infant nestled in between the soft petals of a dew-kissed flower, sound asleep, like the start of a real-life fable. Almost everyone who conjures that mental image will do so using a nearly identical aesthetic—and whether you realize it or not, that’s almost entirely because of the work of legendary baby photographer Anne Geddes. After her debut photography book, Down in the Garden, soared to number three on the New York Times Bestseller list in 1996, Geddes’s wholesomely surreal infant images became inescapable. Oprah went on air to declare Down in the Garden the best coffee-table book she’d ever seen, and by late December 1997, Geddes’s publishing partners had sold more than 1.8 billion (yes, with a “b”) calendars and date books of her photography for the upcoming year. Her dizzying success soon spurred the artist to ramp up production, with a standard Geddes shoot requiring six-to-eight months of planning and a budget between $250,000 and $350,000. But who could blame her for going big? Geddes’s empire of adorable infants seemed unstoppable. Cut to 2020, however, and the picture has changed dramatically—not just for Geddes, but for an entire creative economy driven by analog photography, print publishing, and the high barriers to entry formerly associated with both. Years after smartphones first began putting increasingly high-quality cameras in nearly everyone’s pocket, and Instagram began providing masses of self-trained shutterbugs a free and wide-reaching distribution platform for their images, it’s not hyperbole to say that the pillars on which Geddes built her career have crumbled. So what’s the Queen of Baby Photography to do when her kingdom becomes unrecognizable? Back in May, Andrew Goldstein chatted with Noor Brara, Artnet’s art and design editor, about her recent profile of Geddes. Together, they discussed the artist’s rise, fall, and reckoning with culture’s digital evolution.
26 min
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