Johnny Marr with David Baddiel
Play episode · 48 min
Musician, songwriter and singer Johnny Marr joins David Baddiel in the Penguin Studio to talk about his autobiography Set The Boy Free (and jam with David on the guitar). Johnny talks about first falling in love with the sound of the guitar listening to the Everly Brothers, reveals how he developed a passion for reading whilst bunking off school and explains how he handled huge fame as a teenager. He brings along a selection of treasured objects including The Complete Essays of Aldous Huxley, a Marc Bolan EP, and, of course, his signature model Fender Jaguar. #PenguinPodcast  

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Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed: The Real Reader's Quarterly
24: The Lives and Letters of Charles and Mary Lamb
Dr Felicity James, author of Charles Lamb, Coleridge and Wordsworth: Reading Friendship in the 1790s and current custodian of Charles’s writing chair, introduces the Slightly Foxed editors to siblings at the heart of a literary circle. In their Tales from Shakespeare, gentle-hearted drunken-dog Charles wrote the tragedies and Mary, often chided for laughing, the comedies, and together they penned letters using different coloured inks. From a murder in the home and time in private asylums to conversations with Coleridge at the pub, dissertations on roast pig and salons in their London lodgings, we explore the lives of the Lambs and their friendships through books. Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 43 minutes; 43 seconds) Books Mentioned We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch (mailto:jess@foxedquarterly.com) with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information. - An Englishman’s Commonplace Book (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/an-englishmans-commonplace-book/) , Roger Hudson (2:03) - Charles Lamb, Coleridge and Wordsworth: Reading Friendship in the 1790s, Felicity James is out of print (2:44) - There have been two editions of the Lambs’ letters: The Letters of Charles and Mary Anne Lamb, ed. Edwin W. Marrs, Jr., 3 vols. [which go up to 1817], Cornell University Press, 1975, and The Letters of Charles and Mary Lamb, ed. E. V. Lucas, 3 vols., Dent, 1935. Sadly neither is still in print. - Tales from Shakespeare (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/charles-and-mary-lamb-tales-from-shakespeare) , Charles and Mary Lamb (14:33) - Mrs Leicester’s School and Poetry for Children, Charles and Mary Lamb are out of print (14:44) - Essays of Elia, Charles Lamb is out of print (16:46) - A Double Life: A Biography of Charles and Mary Lamb, Sarah Burton is out of print - The Mirror and the Light (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/hilary-mantel-the-mirror-and-the-light) , Hilary Mantel (39:12) - Ghost Wall (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/sarah-moss-ghost-wall/) , Sarah Moss (41:00) Related Slightly Foxed Articles - Streets, Streets, Streets (https://foxedquarterly.com/felicity-james-the-letters-of-charles-and-mary-lamb-literary-review/) , Felicity James on the letters of Charles and Mary Lamb, Issue 65 - A Delight in Digression (https://foxedquarterly.com/charles-lamb-essays-of-elia-literary-review/) , David Spiller on Essays of Elia, Issue 64 (16:46) Other Links  - The Charles Lamb Society (http://www.charleslambsociety.com/) (36:28)  Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable (https://www.podcastable.co.uk/)
44 min
Literary Friction
Literary Friction
Literary Friction
Literary Friction - Sisters with Daisy Johnson
What is it about sisters? Loving, competitive, sometimes incredibly sinister... this month, we're thinking about sisterhood, and all those memorable sisters that fill the pages of literature with their rivalries and alliances, adoration and rebellion. From Little Women to My Sister the Serial Killer, we're getting into why this familial bond is so potent in storytelling. With the days drawing in and Halloween nearly upon us, we're also thinking about how sisters can be uncanny, and we couldn’t have a better author guest to help us explore the spookiness of the sisterly bond: Daisy Johnson, whose new novel, Sisters, is about two girls who are disturbingly close, and what happens when they move with their mother to a crumbling house on the seaside after they cause a terrible incident at their school. We dedicate this show to sisters everywhere - the good, the bad, and the ugly. Recommendations on the theme, Sisters: Octavia: Atonement by Ian McEwan http://www.ianmcewan.com/books/atonement.html Carrie: We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/133/133431/we-have-always-lived-in-the-castle/9780141191454.html General Recommendations: Octavia: A Man’s Place by Annie Ernaux https://fitzcarraldoeditions.com/books/a-mans-place Daisy: Little Eyes by Samanta Schweblin https://oneworld-publications.com/little-eyes.html Carrie: The Lost Daughter by Elena Ferrante, translated by Ann Goldstein https://www.europaeditions.com/book/9781933372426/the-lost-daughter Email us: litfriction@gmail.com Tweet us & find us on Instagram:
59 min
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library
Writing About the Plague in Shakespeare’s England
Between 1348 and the early years of the 18th century, successive waves of the plague rolled across Europe, killing millions of people and affecting every aspect of life. Despite the plague’s enormous toll on early modern English life, Shakespeare’s plays refer to it only tangentially. Why is that? And what did people write about the plague in early modern England? Over the past 20 years, Rebecca Totaro has been collecting contemporary writing about the plague. She has written five books about its cultural impact. We asked her to join us for a conversation about what Shakespeare’s contemporaries wrote about the plague—and why, just as often, they turned away from it. She is interviewed by Barbara Bogaev. Dr. Rebecca Totaro is an associate dean and a professor of literature in the College of Arts & Sciences at Florida Gulf Coast University. She has written or edited five books: Meteorology and Physiology in Early Modern Culture; Representing the Plague in Early Modern England, which she wrote with Ernest B. Gilman; The Plague Epic in Early Modern England: Heroic Measures, 1603–1721; The Plague in Print; and Suffering in Paradise: The Bubonic Plague in English Literary Studies from More to Milton. From the Shakespeare Unlimited podcast. Published October 13, 2020. © Folger Shakespeare Library. All rights reserved. This podcast episode, “’Twas Pretty, Though a Plague,” was produced by Richard Paul. Garland Scott is the associate producer. It was edited by Gail Kern Paster. Ben Lauer is the web producer. We had technical help from Andrew Feliciano and Evan Marquart at Voice Trax West in Studio City, California.
37 min
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