Bananarama with Nihal Arthanayake
Play • 34 min

Iconic 80’s pop band Bananarama join Nihal Arthanayake to chat about their memoir ‘Really Saying Something’.


They chat about the pressures of the band, how they ended up living in the Sex Pistol’s old rehearsal room and discuss objects which have inspired them creatively which include the Moomins book. #PenguinPodcast


‘Really Saying Something’ is available to buy as an audiobook now - https://apple.co/2KcwGHs

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Literary Friction
Literary Friction
Literary Friction
Literary Friction - Year in Review 2020
It’s our last Literary Friction of 2020, and as usual it's time for our year in review show, packed full of recommendations just in time for your holiday shopping. We'll be looking back over some of the books that got us through this wildly challenging year, and gently revisiting the reading resolutions we made in 2019, when we were still so innocent and full of optimism. We'll also give some resolutions for the year ahead, plus some of the books we are excited to read in 2021. We've teamed up with two of our favourite independent bookshops to offer some ace deals for LF listeners: Burley Fisher (https://burleyfisherbooks.com/) are offering 10% off using the code LITFRICTION at checkout, available until midnight on 23/12. If you spend over £20 at Pages of Hackney (https://pagesofhackney.co.uk/) they'll throw in one of their brilliant totes for free, just add the tote plus books to your basket and use the code LITFRICTION at checkout. They've also put together a list of everything we recommended on this show, here: https://pagesofhackney.co.uk/litfriction/ Top picks from 2020: Carrie: The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett The Lying Life of Adults by Elena Ferrante, translated by Ann Goldstein Lost Cat by Mary Gaitskill The Years by Annie Ernaux, translated by Alison L. Strayer Euphoria by Lily King Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo In The Woods by Tana French Octavia: Weather by Jenny Offill In The Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado Blueberries by Ellena Savage This Brutal House by Niven Govinden Things I Don’t Want To Know by Deborah Levy Exciting Times by Naoise Dolan A Man’s Place by Annie Ernaux, trans. Tanya Leslie Unknown Language by Hildegard of Bingen and Huw Lemmey Looking forward to next year: Carrie: Open Water by Caleb Azuman Nelson Fake Accounts by Lauren Oyler Having and Being Had by Eula Biss Octavia: Tomorrow Sex Will Be Good Again by Katherine Angel Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu This One Sky Day by Leone Ross Email us: litfriction@gmail.com Tweet us & find us on Instagram: @litfriction
50 min
The Lonely Palette
The Lonely Palette
Tamar Avishai
BonusEp 0.4: Tamar Avishai interviews Ralph Steadman
You’ve seen the work of 84-year-old Welsh artist and illustrator Ralph Steadman, even if you haven’t realized it. His searing political caricature and trademark flying ink spatter have illustrated major works of literature and journalism for the past half-century – and most notably the hallucinogenic writing of Hunter S. Thompson, resulting in an alchemic collaboration that wove together journalism and illustration to create what history has described as Gonzo, and what Steadman calls the meeting between an ex-Hell’s Angel with a shaved head and a matted-haired geek with string warts. We spoke in advance of his new retrospective, “Ralph Steadman: A Life in Ink,” and talked about this storied, ink-stained career: what it means to illustrate depravity, how a caricature can capture both body and soul, and where to look for the ever-present birdsong that undergirds our current doom. [2:18]: Love of Picasso and Duchamp. [3:11]: Where do you start with caricature, the body or the soul? [5:40]: Drawing with a pen – “no such thing as a mistake.” [7:09]: The difference between illustration and “fine art”. [9:55]: Use of the geometric in Steadman’s work, ink spatter, a conversation with the paper. [13:10]: Coming to the U.S. in 1970, David Hockney “Paranoids”. [14:30]: Use of photographs and text in drawing. [15:15]: I, Leonardo, the terror of the blank canvas, and “prorogation”. [17:53]: Style, “exposing depravity” and being purified by drawing it. [22:33]: Early career before collaborating with Hunter S. Thompson, alchemy, gonzo. [29:08]: Favorite faces to draw. [30:48]: 2020, the pandemic, and finding the birdsong in doom. Interview Webpage: http://bit.ly/38erSJX Music Used: The Blue Dot Sessions, "Crumbtown" Support the Show: www.patreon.com/lonelypalette
37 min
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed: The Real Reader's Quarterly
27: Dr Wiener’s Library
Anthony Wells worked at The Wiener Holocaust Library in London for a decade. In this episode he leads the Slightly Foxed editors into the history of the library, which holds one of the most extensive archives on the Holocaust and the Nazi era. We travel to Germany, Amsterdam, New York and Tel Aviv, but it is people rather than places that the library remembers with its annals of personal stories. Dr Alfred Wiener, a German Jew who fought in the First World War, was one of the first to note the rise of the Nazi Party, and he began to assemble an archive of information in order to undermine their activities. From downfall by documentation in the Nuremberg Trial to a tracing service made up of millions of records, we learn how The Wiener Library ensures that those who disappeared are not forgotten. With thanks to The Wiener Library for the image used for this episode’s cover artwork: Member of staff, Mrs Walter at The Wiener Library in 1952 Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 37 minutes; 6 seconds) Books Mentioned We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch (mailto:jess@foxedquarterly.com) with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information. The Ratline (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/philippe-sands-the-ratline/) , Philippe Sands (11:39) An Englishman in Auschwitz, Leon Greenman is out of print (14:25) Dinner of Herbs: Village Life in 1960s Turkey (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/carla-grissman-dinner-of-herbs/) , Carla Grissman (28:00) Hope against Hope (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/nadezhda-mandelstam-hope-against-hope/) , Nadezhda Mandelstam (29:42) Defying Hitler (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/sebastian-haffner-defying-hitler/) , Sebastian Haffner (31:04) An Officer and a Spy (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/robert-harris-an-officer-and-a-spy/) , Robert Harris (33:53) Related Slightly Foxed Articles Comfortable Words, (https://foxedquarterly.com/anthony-wells-1662-book-of-common-prayer-literary-review/) Anthony Wells on the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, Issue 36 174517 (https://foxedquarterly.com/david-spiller-primo-levi-literary-review/) , David Spiller on Primo Levi, If This Is a Man and The Truce, Issue 43  Casting Out Fear (https://foxedquarterly.com/viktor-e-frankl-mans-search-for-meaning/) , Gary Mead on Viktor E. Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning, Issue 50 The Hunt for Hitler (https://foxedquarterly.com/hugh-trevor-roper-adam-sisman-literary-review/) , Adam Sisman on Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Last Days of Hitler, Issue 61 Other Links The Wiener Holocaust Library  (https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/) One Tree Books (https://onetreebooks.com/) , Petersfield (23:52) The Petersfield Bookshop (https://www.petersfieldbookshop.com/) (24:45) Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable (https://www.podcastable.co.uk/)
37 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu