Dolly Alderton with Sue Perkins
Play • 35 min

Dolly Alderton, author, journalist and co-host of The High Low podcast chats to Sue Perkins about her first novel, ‘Ghosts’.


Both Sue and Dolly open up about relationships and Dolly reveals the objects that have inspired her work, including a lukewarm glass of white wine and a song by George Michael. #PenguinPodcast 


‘Ghosts’ is now available to buy as an audiobook: https://apple.co/325yw2J

 

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The Art Angle
The Art Angle
Artnet News
Artist Daniel Arsham on How He Built a Creative Empire
When he was just 12 years old, Daniel Arsham had a near-death experience. Living in Florida with his parents, Hurricane Andrew struck in 1992, careening across the coastal state and taking with it Arsham's family house—ripping the roof off, tearing the walls apart at the seams, and sending pink fluffy insulation flying. The house was rebuilt soon after, but the traumatic experience and ensuing weeks of living in a "pre-civilization" state left an indelible imprint on Arsham. The idea of collapsing the past and present, and the formative role architecture played in his understanding of the world, has helped shape Arsham's creative practice, which he describes as fictional archaeology. In his most celebrated series, "Future Relics," Arsham casts objects of commercialism and contemporary society as fragments of an already obsolete time. Along with Alex Mustonen, Arsham founded the irreverently titled group Snarkitechture, and began collaborating with fashion brands like Dior (working with both Hedi Slimane and Kim Jones), KITH, and Adidas, as well as Merce Cunningham and illustrator Hajime Sorayama. Having successfully skated across the boundaries that define genres of art, Arsham's newest gig as creative director of his hometown basketball team, the Cleveland Cavaliers, signaled his supremacy in pop culture. On this week's episode of the Art Angle, Arsham called in from his New York studio to discuss his unlikely story, and what comes next.
38 min
When in Spain
When in Spain
Paul Burge
How to buy property in Spain
Planning to buy a property in Spain? Maybe it's a future ambition to own your dream Spanish home. Whatever the case, this episode will give you a detailed insight into buying a house or apartment in Spain and is packed with practical advice on buying in Spain. It's a meaty subject so I decided to enlist Spanish property consultant Felix Joseph who shares his expert advice. Felix runs his own property consultancy on the Costa del Sol called Property Under One Roof. He's also written a book called How to Buy a Property in Spain: everything they wont tell you about buying a property in Spain. Felix first caught the property bug at a young age when his father unfurled the plans for a house he was going to buy in his native Caribbean. Felix studied an economics degree and then worked in IT for 15 years before investing in property in the UK and building up his own property portfolio which allowed him to semi-retire to Spain with his family. In 2002 he left IT to set up his real estate company ‘Property Under One Roof’ and then moved to Spain in 2006 and pivoted into property consultancy where he offers a wholistic service for people from outside Spain looking to buy. In the this episode we look at: The paperwork you need to get in order in order to be ready to buy property in Spain, such as a fiscal ID number (NIE)  Whether now is a good time to buy property in Spain or not in light of the situation with Covid 19 and for British citizens, Brexit.  The costs associated with buying property in Spain. The property purchasing process in Spain and legal issues involved.  Mortgages and financing options for buying property in Spain.  The Golden Visa How to find a property in Spain Taxes Sage advice and what pitfalls to watch out for when buying property in Spain. Plus a few questions that When in Spain listeners sent in. For more information about Felix Jospeh and his property consultancy check out his website and social media below: Website: http://howtobuyapropertyinspain.com/ His book available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/-/es/Felix-Joseph-ebook/dp/B087QST5M9 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/YOURPUOR
1 hr 4 min
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library
Shakespeare and "Game of Thrones"
Based on his knowledge of Shakespeare’s Henry VI plays, Dr. Jeffrey R. Wilson of Harvard University knew just how HBO's "Game of Thrones" would play out. Jon Snow, the illegitimate son, was a Richard III type, who would win the crown (and our hearts). But Daenerys Targaryen, as a kind of Henry VII, would defeat him in battle and win it back, restoring peace and order. Turns out he was wrong about all of that. But as Wilson kept watching, he began to appreciate the other ways "Game of Thrones" is similar to Shakespeare—like the way that both Shakespeare and George R.R. Martin’s stories translate the history of the Wars of the Roses into other popular genres. Jeff Wilson’s new book, "Shakespeare and 'Game of Thrones,'" explores some of the ways that Shakespeare influenced "Game of Thrones"… as well as some of the ways that "Game of Thrones" has begun to influence Shakespeare. Wilson is interviewed by Barbara Bogaev. Dr. Jeffrey R. Wilson is a faculty member in the Writing Program at Harvard University, where he teaches the Why Shakespeare? section of the University's first-year writing course. His new book, "Shakespeare and 'Game of Thrones,'" was published by Routledge in 2020. From the Shakespeare Unlimited podcast. Published January 19, 2021. © Folger Shakespeare Library. All rights reserved. This podcast episode, “Uneasy Lies the Head That Wears a Crown,” was produced by Richard Paul. Garland Scott is the associate producer. It was edited by Gail Kern Paster. Ben Lauer is the web producer. Leonor Fernandez edits our transcripts. We had technical help from Andrew Feliciano at Voice Trax West in Studio City California. Special thanks to DC-based playwright Allyson Currin for finding all of the "Game of Thrones" clips that appear in this episode.
37 min
The Lonely Palette
The Lonely Palette
Tamar Avishai
BonusEp 0.4: Tamar Avishai interviews Ralph Steadman
You’ve seen the work of 84-year-old Welsh artist and illustrator Ralph Steadman, even if you haven’t realized it. His searing political caricature and trademark flying ink spatter have illustrated major works of literature and journalism for the past half-century – and most notably the hallucinogenic writing of Hunter S. Thompson, resulting in an alchemic collaboration that wove together journalism and illustration to create what history has described as Gonzo, and what Steadman calls the meeting between an ex-Hell’s Angel with a shaved head and a matted-haired geek with string warts. We spoke in advance of his new retrospective, “Ralph Steadman: A Life in Ink,” and talked about this storied, ink-stained career: what it means to illustrate depravity, how a caricature can capture both body and soul, and where to look for the ever-present birdsong that undergirds our current doom. [2:18]: Love of Picasso and Duchamp. [3:11]: Where do you start with caricature, the body or the soul? [5:40]: Drawing with a pen – “no such thing as a mistake.” [7:09]: The difference between illustration and “fine art”. [9:55]: Use of the geometric in Steadman’s work, ink spatter, a conversation with the paper. [13:10]: Coming to the U.S. in 1970, David Hockney “Paranoids”. [14:30]: Use of photographs and text in drawing. [15:15]: I, Leonardo, the terror of the blank canvas, and “prorogation”. [17:53]: Style, “exposing depravity” and being purified by drawing it. [22:33]: Early career before collaborating with Hunter S. Thompson, alchemy, gonzo. [29:08]: Favorite faces to draw. [30:48]: 2020, the pandemic, and finding the birdsong in doom. Interview Webpage: http://bit.ly/38erSJX Music Used: The Blue Dot Sessions, "Crumbtown" Support the Show: www.patreon.com/lonelypalette
37 min
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed: The Real Reader's Quarterly
27: Dr Wiener’s Library
Anthony Wells worked at The Wiener Holocaust Library in London for a decade. In this episode he leads the Slightly Foxed editors into the history of the library, which holds one of the most extensive archives on the Holocaust and the Nazi era. We travel to Germany, Amsterdam, New York and Tel Aviv, but it is people rather than places that the library remembers with its annals of personal stories. Dr Alfred Wiener, a German Jew who fought in the First World War, was one of the first to note the rise of the Nazi Party, and he began to assemble an archive of information in order to undermine their activities. From downfall by documentation in the Nuremberg Trial to a tracing service made up of millions of records, we learn how The Wiener Library ensures that those who disappeared are not forgotten. With thanks to The Wiener Library for the image used for this episode’s cover artwork: Member of staff, Mrs Walter at The Wiener Library in 1952 Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 37 minutes; 6 seconds) Books Mentioned We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch (mailto:jess@foxedquarterly.com) with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information. The Ratline (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/philippe-sands-the-ratline/) , Philippe Sands (11:39) An Englishman in Auschwitz, Leon Greenman is out of print (14:25) Dinner of Herbs: Village Life in 1960s Turkey (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/carla-grissman-dinner-of-herbs/) , Carla Grissman (28:00) Hope against Hope (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/nadezhda-mandelstam-hope-against-hope/) , Nadezhda Mandelstam (29:42) Defying Hitler (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/sebastian-haffner-defying-hitler/) , Sebastian Haffner (31:04) An Officer and a Spy (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/robert-harris-an-officer-and-a-spy/) , Robert Harris (33:53) Related Slightly Foxed Articles Comfortable Words, (https://foxedquarterly.com/anthony-wells-1662-book-of-common-prayer-literary-review/) Anthony Wells on the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, Issue 36 174517 (https://foxedquarterly.com/david-spiller-primo-levi-literary-review/) , David Spiller on Primo Levi, If This Is a Man and The Truce, Issue 43  Casting Out Fear (https://foxedquarterly.com/viktor-e-frankl-mans-search-for-meaning/) , Gary Mead on Viktor E. Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning, Issue 50 The Hunt for Hitler (https://foxedquarterly.com/hugh-trevor-roper-adam-sisman-literary-review/) , Adam Sisman on Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Last Days of Hitler, Issue 61 Other Links The Wiener Holocaust Library  (https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/) One Tree Books (https://onetreebooks.com/) , Petersfield (23:52) The Petersfield Bookshop (https://www.petersfieldbookshop.com/) (24:45) Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable (https://www.podcastable.co.uk/)
37 min
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