Andrew Hunter Murray with Katy Brand
Play • 36 min

Andrew Hunter Murray, writer for the BBC’s QI programme and co-host of the hugely successful ‘No Such Thing as a Fish’ podcast, chats to Katy Brand about his new thriller set in 2059.


Used to researching unusual facts and writing comedy, Andrew explains what it was like writing fiction set in the near future. He brings objects to the studio that have inspired him including an iceberg (not the real thing) and a stuffed dog (which currently resides at Slough station). #PenguinPodcast

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Culture Call
Culture Call
Financial Times
Shantell Martin on how to draw a line. Plus: Gris returns!
Welcome to our Season 3 finale! To wrap up the year, Lilah is joined by the artist Shantell Martin. Shantell draws big, bold lines. Everywhere. She makes a strong case for taking out a pen. We discuss how to teach art to the next generation, what it means to 'sell out' in the art world, British versus American racism, and an urgent question for this time: who are you? Afterwards, co-host Griselda Murray Brown stops in during maternity leave to talk about motherhood and this season's themes. Thank you for joining us on this journey. You can keep in touch with Lilah on Instagram at @lilahrap, on Twitter at @lilahrap and @ftculturecall, and by email at culturecall@ft.com. Links from the show: For free 30-day access to all FT journalism, sign up to the Coronavirus Business Update newsletter with this special link. —Shantell on Instagram —Shantell's work at the New York City Ballet —Dear Grandmother, a collaboration between Dot and Shantell Martin —New Tricks, Shantell's British detective show recommendation, is on Amazon Prime —Janelle Monáe music video for Turntables —A great recent FT interview with Mary Gaitskill, author of Lost Cat —Morning Song, a poem by Sylvia Plath —Great back catalogue episodes: start the six-episode journey of this season with episode one: Miranda July! Some standout Gris interviews include Tyler Mitchell, George the Poet and Jia Tolentino. Some standout Lilah interviews include Ira Glass, Maaza Mengiste and Esther Perel. --- “Turntables” is an original song by Janelle Monáe for the Liz Garbus and Lisa Cortés' 2020 documentary film All In: The Fight for Democracy. Courtesy Bad Boy, 2021   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
56 min
The Great Women Artists
The Great Women Artists
Katy Hessel
Rebecca VanDiver on Lois Mailou Jones
In episode 52 of The Great Women Artists Podcast, Katy Hessel interviews the renowned art historian Rebecca K. VanDiver on the trailblazing and legendary LOIS MAILOU JONES (1905–1998) !!!! [This episode is brought to you by Alighieri jewellery: www.alighieri.co.uk | use the code TGWA at checkout for 10% off!] Born in Boston, had her first exhibition aged 17, and found herself in the midst of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s, Lois Mailou Jones had an EXTENSIVE artistic career that spanned almost an entire century, and an oeuvre that ranged from traditional portraits, Haitian landscapes, to African-themed abstraction. Born to accomplished, upper-middle-class, professional parents in Boston, Jones spent her early years surrounded by the cultural elite on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, including sculptor Meta Warwick Fuller, a mentor to the young Jones and encouraging her to study in Paris. Continuously awarded scholarships to the School of the Museum of Fine Arts associated with the Boston Museum, the always highly determined Jones originally pursued textiles (however soon retracted after finding out that designers’ names weren’t recognised in the same as painters). An educator for nearly 50 years, she first got a job at PalmerMemorial School (which she would drive down to in her sports car, as well as coach basketball!), and in 1930 was personally recruited to teach at Howard University, the epicentre of Black intellectualism (her students included Elizabeth Catlett, and painter Alma Thomas was her neighbour in DC!). Spending many summers of the 1920s immersed in the Harlem Renaissance, between 1937–8 Jones ventured to Paris on sabbatical, where she adopted an impressionist-like style, painting ‘en plein air’. Like so many of her contemporaries of the Harlem Renaissance, Jones felt welcome as an artist in Paris. Developing her negotiations with African themes in her work, such as Les Fetiches, 1937, a small painting of African masks, it was on her return to America that she was encouraged by Harlem Renaissance gatekeeper, Alain Locke, to further embrace the everyday life of African American people. Honoured by numerous presidents, granted a Lois Mailou Jones Day AND Avenue in America, it wasn't until her elderly age that she took America by storm. And WOW. Has she had an impact on American art. ENJOY!!!! Rebecca K Vandiver is a RENOWNED scholar, and has just written a book on LMJ! See here: https://www.waterstones.com/book/designing-a-new-tradition/rebecca-vandiver//9780271086040 FURTHER LINKS! https://www.rebeccavandiver.com/ https://americanart.si.edu/artist/lo%C3%AFs-mailou-jones-5658 https://nmwa.org/art/artists/lois-mailou-jones/ https://hyperallergic.com/600201/lois-mailou-jones-an-artist-and-educator-who-made-history/ Follow us: Katy Hessel: @thegreatwomenartists / @katy.hessel Sound editing by Laura Hendry  Artwork by @thisisaliceskinner Music by Ben Wetherfield https://www.thegreatwomenartists.com/
51 min
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed: The Real Reader's Quarterly
27: Dr Wiener’s Library
Anthony Wells worked at The Wiener Holocaust Library in London for a decade. In this episode he leads the Slightly Foxed editors into the history of the library, which holds one of the most extensive archives on the Holocaust and the Nazi era. We travel to Germany, Amsterdam, New York and Tel Aviv, but it is people rather than places that the library remembers with its annals of personal stories. Dr Alfred Wiener, a German Jew who fought in the First World War, was one of the first to note the rise of the Nazi Party, and he began to assemble an archive of information in order to undermine their activities. From downfall by documentation in the Nuremberg Trial to a tracing service made up of millions of records, we learn how The Wiener Library ensures that those who disappeared are not forgotten. With thanks to The Wiener Library for the image used for this episode’s cover artwork: Member of staff, Mrs Walter at The Wiener Library in 1952 Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 37 minutes; 6 seconds) Books Mentioned We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch (mailto:jess@foxedquarterly.com) with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information. The Ratline (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/philippe-sands-the-ratline/) , Philippe Sands (11:39) An Englishman in Auschwitz, Leon Greenman is out of print (14:25) Dinner of Herbs: Village Life in 1960s Turkey (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/carla-grissman-dinner-of-herbs/) , Carla Grissman (28:00) Hope against Hope (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/nadezhda-mandelstam-hope-against-hope/) , Nadezhda Mandelstam (29:42) Defying Hitler (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/sebastian-haffner-defying-hitler/) , Sebastian Haffner (31:04) An Officer and a Spy (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/robert-harris-an-officer-and-a-spy/) , Robert Harris (33:53) Related Slightly Foxed Articles Comfortable Words, (https://foxedquarterly.com/anthony-wells-1662-book-of-common-prayer-literary-review/) Anthony Wells on the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, Issue 36 174517 (https://foxedquarterly.com/david-spiller-primo-levi-literary-review/) , David Spiller on Primo Levi, If This Is a Man and The Truce, Issue 43  Casting Out Fear (https://foxedquarterly.com/viktor-e-frankl-mans-search-for-meaning/) , Gary Mead on Viktor E. Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning, Issue 50 The Hunt for Hitler (https://foxedquarterly.com/hugh-trevor-roper-adam-sisman-literary-review/) , Adam Sisman on Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Last Days of Hitler, Issue 61 Other Links The Wiener Holocaust Library  (https://www.wienerlibrary.co.uk/) One Tree Books (https://onetreebooks.com/) , Petersfield (23:52) The Petersfield Bookshop (https://www.petersfieldbookshop.com/) (24:45) Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable (https://www.podcastable.co.uk/)
37 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu