Bernardine Evaristo with Nihal Arthanayake
Play • 33 min

Bernardine won the Booker prize last year with her novel ‘Girl, Woman, Other’, one of Barack Obama’s top books of 2019 and hailed 'book of the decade' by The Sunday Times and The Guardian. Bernardine brings objects into the studio that have inspired her creatively, including a song from Hamilton the musical and a photo of her paternal grandmother (who she dedicates every single book to) #PenguinPodcast

 

To buy the audiobook:

https://apple.co/2UBqkmv

 

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Literary Friction
Literary Friction
Literary Friction
Literary Friction - Year in Review 2020
It’s our last Literary Friction of 2020, and as usual it's time for our year in review show, packed full of recommendations just in time for your holiday shopping. We'll be looking back over some of the books that got us through this wildly challenging year, and gently revisiting the reading resolutions we made in 2019, when we were still so innocent and full of optimism. We'll also give some resolutions for the year ahead, plus some of the books we are excited to read in 2021. We've teamed up with two of our favourite independent bookshops to offer some ace deals for LF listeners: Burley Fisher (https://burleyfisherbooks.com/) are offering 10% off using the code LITFRICTION at checkout, available until midnight on 23/12. If you spend over £20 at Pages of Hackney (https://pagesofhackney.co.uk/) they'll throw in one of their brilliant totes for free, just add the tote plus books to your basket and use the code LITFRICTION at checkout. They've also put together a list of everything we recommended on this show, here: https://pagesofhackney.co.uk/litfriction/ Top picks from 2020: Carrie: The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett The Lying Life of Adults by Elena Ferrante, translated by Ann Goldstein Lost Cat by Mary Gaitskill The Years by Annie Ernaux, translated by Alison L. Strayer Euphoria by Lily King Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo In The Woods by Tana French Octavia: Weather by Jenny Offill In The Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado Blueberries by Ellena Savage This Brutal House by Niven Govinden Things I Don’t Want To Know by Deborah Levy Exciting Times by Naoise Dolan A Man’s Place by Annie Ernaux, trans. Tanya Leslie Unknown Language by Hildegard of Bingen and Huw Lemmey Looking forward to next year: Carrie: Open Water by Caleb Azuman Nelson Fake Accounts by Lauren Oyler Having and Being Had by Eula Biss Octavia: Tomorrow Sex Will Be Good Again by Katherine Angel Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu This One Sky Day by Leone Ross Email us: litfriction@gmail.com Tweet us & find us on Instagram: @litfriction
50 min
Culture Call
Culture Call
Financial Times
Shantell Martin on how to draw a line. Plus: Gris returns!
Welcome to our Season 3 finale! To wrap up the year, Lilah is joined by the artist Shantell Martin. Shantell draws big, bold lines. Everywhere. She makes a strong case for taking out a pen. We discuss how to teach art to the next generation, what it means to 'sell out' in the art world, British versus American racism, and an urgent question for this time: who are you? Afterwards, co-host Griselda Murray Brown stops in during maternity leave to talk about motherhood and this season's themes. Thank you for joining us on this journey. You can keep in touch with Lilah on Instagram at @lilahrap, on Twitter at @lilahrap and @ftculturecall, and by email at culturecall@ft.com. Links from the show: For free 30-day access to all FT journalism, sign up to the Coronavirus Business Update newsletter with this special link. —Shantell on Instagram —Shantell's work at the New York City Ballet —Dear Grandmother, a collaboration between Dot and Shantell Martin —New Tricks, Shantell's British detective show recommendation, is on Amazon Prime —Janelle Monáe music video for Turntables —A great recent FT interview with Mary Gaitskill, author of Lost Cat —Morning Song, a poem by Sylvia Plath —Great back catalogue episodes: start the six-episode journey of this season with episode one: Miranda July! Some standout Gris interviews include Tyler Mitchell, George the Poet and Jia Tolentino. Some standout Lilah interviews include Ira Glass, Maaza Mengiste and Esther Perel. --- “Turntables” is an original song by Janelle Monáe for the Liz Garbus and Lisa Cortés' 2020 documentary film All In: The Fight for Democracy. Courtesy Bad Boy, 2021   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
56 min
The Lonely Palette
The Lonely Palette
Tamar Avishai
BonusEp 0.4: Tamar Avishai interviews Ralph Steadman
You’ve seen the work of 84-year-old Welsh artist and illustrator Ralph Steadman, even if you haven’t realized it. His searing political caricature and trademark flying ink spatter have illustrated major works of literature and journalism for the past half-century – and most notably the hallucinogenic writing of Hunter S. Thompson, resulting in an alchemic collaboration that wove together journalism and illustration to create what history has described as Gonzo, and what Steadman calls the meeting between an ex-Hell’s Angel with a shaved head and a matted-haired geek with string warts. We spoke in advance of his new retrospective, “Ralph Steadman: A Life in Ink,” and talked about this storied, ink-stained career: what it means to illustrate depravity, how a caricature can capture both body and soul, and where to look for the ever-present birdsong that undergirds our current doom. [2:18]: Love of Picasso and Duchamp. [3:11]: Where do you start with caricature, the body or the soul? [5:40]: Drawing with a pen – “no such thing as a mistake.” [7:09]: The difference between illustration and “fine art”. [9:55]: Use of the geometric in Steadman’s work, ink spatter, a conversation with the paper. [13:10]: Coming to the U.S. in 1970, David Hockney “Paranoids”. [14:30]: Use of photographs and text in drawing. [15:15]: I, Leonardo, the terror of the blank canvas, and “prorogation”. [17:53]: Style, “exposing depravity” and being purified by drawing it. [22:33]: Early career before collaborating with Hunter S. Thompson, alchemy, gonzo. [29:08]: Favorite faces to draw. [30:48]: 2020, the pandemic, and finding the birdsong in doom. Interview Webpage: http://bit.ly/38erSJX Music Used: The Blue Dot Sessions, "Crumbtown" Support the Show: www.patreon.com/lonelypalette
37 min
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