Has Any American Killed More Americans Than Donald Trump??
Play episode · 34 min

So Donald Trump copped to it. He told Bob Woodward that he knew how deadly the virus was—and downplayed it anyway, encouraging MAGA nation to act as if COVID-19 was a cheap Chinese knock-off of the flu. “It's remarkable that in these interviews, the President of the United States confessed to fucking manslaughter,” Molly Jong-Fast says on the latest episode of The New Abnormal. The lawyers might debate whether Trump has any criminal culpability. But to Rick Wilson, there’s no question about Trump’s moral responsibility. “No American has killed more of their fellow Americans in this country than Donald Trump, except for Robert E. Lee and Jefferson fucking Davis. No one has a body count to rival Trump's. He knew it. He knew it was there. He did it. He let it happen. It is the most unbelievable and horrifying outcome that we can imagine.” Molly adds, “Mike Pence was at a pro-life event the other day. And I was thinking about the irony, right? This administration has killed 100,000 plus plus plus people. And they're talking about embryos. Like, it's almost beyond parody.” Mike Schmidt, the Pulitzer-winning New York Times reporter, joins Rick and Molly to talk about his new book, which examines some of Trump’s closest confidants—to stop the president from using his power. “What is that human experience to be one of those guardrails and those containers? What is that like? What is the human experience of standing between the president and the abyss?”




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LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers
LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers
KCRW
What is an official act?
Jean Carroll accused President Trump of raping her in the 1990s. The president crassly denied her allegation, and she sued him for defamation, saying that he defamed her by calling her a liar. The federal government has sought to intervene here, stepping into Trump’s shoes and becoming the defendant in the case, and now they are arguing that when the president said he didn’t rape Carroll and that she is “not [his] type,” he was acting in his official capacity as president. Is the Justice Department right about that? And with the Department of Justice stepping in for the president in the defamation suit, which effectively makes it impossible for the suit to proceed, doesn’t this elevate the president above the law — in this case, defamation law? What about another instance, where the Department of Justice is arguing that when President Trump tweeted an order to declassify all documents related to the Russia investigation and Hillary Clinton’s emails...that was *not* him acting in his official capacity? The Department of Justice is also suing Stephanie Wolkoff, the former aide to First Lady Melania Trump, saying her tell-all book violated a nondisclosure agreement and therefore her book proceeds should be forfeited to the government. DOJ argues: "such accounts purporting to disclose internal policy deliberations undermine the expectation of future Presidents and First Ladies that their confidential deliberations will be protected and preserved from the public glare. The President’s policy conversations are self-evidently core matters on which the President is entitled to receive confidential advice without fear that such internal deliberations will be leaked to the press." This seems like a major expansion of executive privilege, and by the way, FLOTUS is not a federal employee, so should the government be defending her interests in court? Plus: Hunter Biden’s laptop and Rudy Giuliani, a remarkable First Amendment argument from Devin Nunes, and major Republican fundraiser Elliot Broidy pleads guilty and agrees to cooperate with investigators.
28 min
Political Gabfest
Political Gabfest
Slate Podcasts
Last Debate of Donald Trump’s Career
Slate Plus members get a bonus segment on the Gabfest each week, and access to special bonus episodes throughout the year. Sign up now to listen and support our show. For this week’s Slate Plus bonus segment, Emily, David, and John discuss Jeffrey Toobin’s suspension from The New Yorker. You can tweet suggestions, links, and questions to @SlateGabfest. Tweet us your cocktail chatter using #cocktailchatter. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.)   The email address for the Political Gabfest is gabfest@slate.com. (Email may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Here are some references from this week’s show: Yanna Krupnikov and John Barry Ryan for the New York Times: “The Real Divide in America Is Between Political Junkies and Everyone Else” Caitlin Dickerson for the New York Times: “Parents of 545 Children Separated at the Border Cannot Be Found” Michael D. Shear, Katie Benner, and Michael S. Schmidt for the New York Times: “ ‘We Need to Take Away Children,’ No Matter How Young, Justice Dept. Officials Said” Jake Tapper for CNN: “Administration Officials Alarmed by White House Push to Fast Track Lucrative 5G Spectrum Contract, Sources Say” Eric Lipton for the New York Times: “Trump Issues Order Giving Him More Leeway to Hire and Fire Federal Workers” Here are this week’s cocktail chatters:  Emily: Joe Sexton for ProPublica: “He’d Waited Decades to Argue His Innocence. She Was a Judge Who Believed in Second Chances. Nobody Knew She Suffered from Alzheimer’s.” John: Nate Chinen for the New York Times: “Keith Jarrett Confronts a Future Without the Piano” David: David Plotz for Medium: “The Future is Local: That’s Why I’m Launching City Cast, a Network of Daily Local Podcasts.”   Listener chatter from @greenneck: Rose Eveleth for Smithsonian Magazine: “There Are Whales Alive Today Who Were Born Before Moby Dick Was Written” Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 6 min
The Ezra Klein Show
The Ezra Klein Show
Vox
Sarah Kliff grades Biden and Trump's health care plans
There are few issues on which the stakes in this election are quite as stark as on health care. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden plans to pass (and Democrats largely support) a massive health care expansion that could result in 25 million additional individuals gaining health insurance. The Trump administration, as we speak, is pushing to get the Supreme Court to kill the Affordable Care Act, which would strip at least 20 million Americans of health care coverage.    There's no one I'd rather have on to discuss these issues than Sarah Kliff. Kliff is an investigative reporter for the New York Times focusing on health care policy, and my former colleague at the Washington Post and Vox where we co-hosted The Weeds alongside Matt Yglesias. She's one of the most clear, incisive health care policy analysts in media today and a longtime friend, which made this conversation a pleasure. We discuss:  The legacy of Obamacare 10 years later Why the fiercely fought over “individual mandate” isn’t all it’s cracked up to be  What Biden’s health care plan would actually do — and where it falls short  Whether a Biden administration would be able to pass massive health care reform — and why it might still have a chance even if the filibuster remains intact  The ongoing Supreme Court case to dismantle Obamacare  Whether Donald Trump has a secret health care plan to protect those with preexisting conditions (spoiler: he doesn’t)  The hollow state of Republican health care policy  The academic literature showing that health insurance is literally a matter of life and death  Which social investments would have the largest impact on people’s health (hint: it’s probably not expanding insurance)    And much more References: "If Trump wins, 20 million people could lose health insurance. If Biden wins, 25 million could gain it." by Dylan Scott, Vox “Obamacare Turns 10. Here’s a Look at What Works and Doesn’t.” by Sarah Kliff, et al. New York Times "The I.R.S. Sent a Letter to 3.9 Million People. It Saved Some of Their Lives." by Sarah Kliff, New York Times "Republicans Killed the Obamacare Mandate. New Data Shows It Didn’t Really Matter." by Sarah Kliff, New York Times "Without Ginsburg, Supreme Court Could Rule Three Ways on Obamacare" by Sarah Kliff and Margot Sanger-Katz, New York Times Book recommendations: The Healing of America by TR Reid  And the Band Played On by Randy Shilts  Dreamland by Sam Quinones  I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen Credits: Producer/Audio wizard - Jeff Geld Researcher - Roge Karma Please consider making a contribution to Vox to support this show: bit.ly/givepodcasts Your support will help us keep having ambitious conversations about big ideas. New to the show? Want to check out Ezra’s favorite episodes? Check out the Ezra Klein Show beginner’s guide (http://bit.ly/EKSbeginhere) Want to contact the show? Reach out at ezrakleinshow@vox.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 19 min
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