What Will Happen to Fox News When Rupert Murdoch Dies?
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Everybody has got to die sometime, even the Great and Powerful Fox News giant Rupert Murdoch. But what will happen to the empire when papa ‘Doch finally does kick the bucket? CNN’s Brian Stelter shared his theory with Rick Wilson and Molly Jong-Fast on this episode of The New Abnormal and it’s hard not to see it as a possibility. But spoiler alert: It’s super complicated. (“There will be a battle over the future of the company because there's this trust right now. There's eight votes in the trust,” he says. “Rupert has four votes and the kids have four votes. So he wins. If, and when he dies, there will be four votes from four children,” and dun dun, dun” one of them leans more liberal.) Stelter did the work none of us wants to and wrote a whole book about Fox. He brought up a personal Molly Jong-Fast nightmare (Tucker Carlson 2024?) and the trio discussed the very obvious occurrence of the network literally controlling what the president says or does. (“Tucker will tweet or say something on the air. And two days later, it's Donald Trump's policy.”) Then! Dr. Al Gross, who is running for Senate in Alaska as an Independent, spoke with Molly and producer Jesse Cannon about why the state isn’t as red as everyone thinks and how he’s able to balance his time as a commercial fisherman, an orthopedic surgeon, and Master of Public Health. Oh, and that stimulus check the state’s citizens get called UBI. Plus! Find out which hill Bill Barr is dying on to protect Trump this time.


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Stay Tuned with Preet
Stay Tuned with Preet
CAFE
CAFE Insider 10/20: “October Surprise(s)?”
In this sample from the CAFE Insider podcast, Preet and Anne break down the multitude of questions raised by the controversial New York Post article that sought to implicate Vice President Joe Biden in corruption related to a Ukrainian energy firm linked to Hunter Biden.   In the full episode, Preet and Anne discuss Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court confirmation hearings; the terrorism charges in the foiled plot to kidnap Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer; the DOJ “unmasking” probe investigating Obama administration officials that concluded without any charges or a public report; and more. To listen to the full episode, and get access to all exclusive CAFE Insider content, including the newly launched United Security and Cyber Space podcasts, try out the membership free for two weeks: www.cafe.com/insider Sign up to receive the weekly CAFE Brief newsletter, featuring analysis by Elie Honig: www.cafe.com/brief This podcast is produced by CAFE Studios.  Tamara Sepper – Executive Producer; Adam Waller – Senior Editorial Producer; Matthew Billy – Audio Producer; Jake Kaplan – Editorial Producer REFERENCES & SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIALS:  “EXCLUSIVE: Fox News Passed on Hunter Biden Laptop Story Over Credibility Concerns,” Mediaite, 10/19/20 “New York Post Published Hunter Biden Report Amid Newsroom Doubts,” NYT, 10/18/20 “White House was warned Giuliani was target of Russian intelligence operation to feed misinformation to Trump,” WaPo, 10/15/20 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
13 min
LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers
LRC Presents: All the President's Lawyers
KCRW
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28 min
Political Gabfest
Political Gabfest
Slate Podcasts
Empty Notepad
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1 hr 17 min
Left, Right & Center
Left, Right & Center
KCRW
This town hall ain’t big enough for the two of us
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1 hr 1 min
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