#129 Why Women Are More Likely to Develop Alzheimer’s with Dr Lisa Mosconi
1 hr 52 min

Women's brain health remains one of the most under researched, under diagnosed and under undertreated fields of medicine. Women are twice as likely as men to develop Alzheimer’s and twice as likely to become anxious or depressed. They are four times more likely to suffer with headaches and migraines and they are more prone to brain tumours and strokes than men. Today’s guest says this is a clear indication of functional differences between female and male brains. And she’s made it her life’s work to learn more about it.

Neuroscientist Dr Lisa Mosconi is director of the Women’s Brain Initiative and works at the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medical College, US, where she studies how genetics, lifestyle and nutrition shape brain health, particularly in women.

Lisa describes her frustration at constantly being told by peers that the reason Alzheimer’s was more prevalent in women was simply because they live longer, and it’s a disease of ageing. We discuss her ground-breaking research that has exposed this bias, finding dementia brain changes can actually begin in midlife, triggered by declining oestrogen during perimenopause. Worrying as that might sound, this discovery will enable women to take control of their risk at a much earlier age. Lisa goes on to share plenty of practical, evidence-based advice to help you do that.

I was really moved hearing Lisa talk about the beautiful changes that happen in the female brain during pregnancy and post-partum. It’s a new take on the idea of ‘Mummy brain’ and will be validating for all mothers out there to hear. She also gives a clear and candid explanation of how perimenopause alters brain function. So many of my patients in their 40s and 50s are scared by changes like forgetfulness, brain fog and anxiety. If that’s you or someone you know, Lisa’s insights and advice will be really empowering.

I’m a passionate advocate for women’s health equality. Yet chatting with Lisa made me realise how much more work we all have to do to get topics like these out there and understood. This conversation is relevant to all of us, women and men alike. I hope it gets you thinking and talking more. 

Show notes available at drchatterjee.com/129

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DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.

 

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The One You Feed
The One You Feed
Eric Zimmer|Wondery
363: Cory Allen on Cultivating Mindfulness
Cory Allen is a writer, musician, meditation teacher, and creator of the podcast, The Astral Hustle, which focuses on how to live better with leading experts in mindfulness, neuroscience, and philosophy. Cory believes that the more we understand ourselves, the less we suffer. In this episode, Cory and Eric discuss his book, Now Is The Way: An Unconventional Approach To Modern Mindfulness. But wait – there’s more! The episode is not quite over!! We continue the conversation and you can access this exclusive content right in your podcast player feed. Head over to our Patreon page and pledge to donate just $10 a month. It’s that simple and we’ll give you good stuff as a thank you! In This Interview, Cory Allen and I Discuss Cultivating Mindfulness and… * His book, Now Is The Way: An Unconventional Approach To Modern Mindfulness * The role of our actions in determining who we are * How to differentiate between helpful and unhelpful negative thoughts and emotions * The most effective way to widen the gap between stimulus and response * The watching mind and the doing mind * Why the notions of emptiness and non-self needn’t be scary * The answer to the question, “Does my life even matter?” * How we assign meaning rather than find meaning in life * What it means to dilute strong emotions or ruminating thoughts when they arise Cory Allen Links: www.cory-allen.org Twitter Instagram BLUBlox offers high-quality lenses that filter blue light, reduce glare, and combat the unhealthy effects of our digital life. Visit BLUblox.com and get free shipping worldwide and also 15% off with Promo Code: WOLF15 SimpliSafe: Get comprehensive protection for your entire home with security cameras, alarms, sensors as well as fire, water, and carbon monoxide alerts. SimpliSafe is having a huge holiday sale! Visit simplisafe.com/wolf for a free home security camera and 40% off any security system.  Pachamama: Produces extraordinary high quality, organic CBD products. They are one of three companies in over 200 top selling CBD brands to actually test negative for leads, metals, and pesticides and test positive for having the right amount of CBD. Visit www.enjoypachamama.com and use code WOLF for 25% off. If you enjoyed this conversation with Cory Allen on Cultivating Mindfulness, you might also enjoy these other episodes: Effortless Mindfulness with Loch Kelly Transformative Mindfulness with Shauna Shapiro
56 min
Psychologists Off The Clock
Psychologists Off The Clock
Diana Hill, Debbie Sorensen, Yael Schonbrun & Jill Stoddard
173. Confidence, Self-Doubt, and Overcoming Limitations with Our New Team Member, Michael Herold
In his TEDx talk, Michael Herold, public speaker, confidence coach, and podcaster extraordinaire, says, “Things you will achieve in your life, you will achieve because of your disability, not in spite of it.” In this week’s episode of Psychologists Off the Clock, Michael talks with Debbie and Yael about confidence, self-doubt, and overcoming limitations. Limitations are all around us. These might be thoughts about how unqualified we are, feelings of anxiety, or even physical disabilities such as spinal muscular atrophy, but Michael Herold has some good news. We can overcome the limitations that come from our own heads, by taking Comfort Zone Challenges! Join us in this episode to learn about how to work with those limitations, instead of against them, to achieve the life you want.  The Psychologists Off the Clock are excited to welcome Michael aboard as our new Strategic Consultant. Join us to for this episode to meet Michael and learn about our new team member!  Listen and Learn How to build confidence and step outside your comfort zone About Michael’s transition from animator to public speaker, coach, and podcaster  Why Acceptance and Commitment Therapy resonates with Michael and how it changed his life  How Michael’s disability, spinal muscular atrophy, has shaped his unique perspective  How you can use values to overcome your limitations About motivational porn and the microaggressions we often use when discussing people who have ‘overcome’ disability-related limitations Why it’s so important to connect with people and how to do that  Inside information on how Coach Michael works to build his clients’ confidence  Tips and tricks from the master himself on how to build your own confidence Resources from this Podcast Episode Michael's TEDx talk  Michael’s website Michael's podcast: The Art of Charm   The Art of Charm Podcast's Episode featuring Michael  The Art of Charm Podcast's Core Confidence Program  Viktor Frankl's Book: Man's Search for Meaning  Michael’s Short Film “When I grow up” All of Michael’s short animated films  Michael Herold   About Michael Herold Early in his life, doctors told Michael Herold’s parents that his severe disability would keep him from living a normal life. The doctors were right. Michael’s life has been anything but normal. In fact, he is quite a renaissance man. For over a decade, Michael was a successful animator for Nickelodeon and worked on a variety of shows including Penguins of Madagascar and Kung Fu Panda. He currently does public speaking around the world and has recently spoken in front of parliament and given a TEDx talk. Michael also uses skills and exercises from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to provide coaching on a variety of life-skills including public speaking, self-doubt, communication, and, primarily, confidence. Visit Michael’s website to find out more!      Episode 91. Disability as a Form of Diversity with Dr. Erin Andrews Episode 169. Microaggressions, Mental Health Disparities, and Racial Trauma with Monnica Williams Episode 102. A Liberated Mind with Dr. Steven Hayes Episode 72. Committed Action with Dr. DJ Moran Episode 32. Social Connection: Exploring Loneliness and Building Intimacy
1 hr 16 min
Good Life Project
Good Life Project
Jonathan Fields / Wondery
Matthew McConaughey | Just Keep Livin'
Five days into filming his first movie - Dazed & Confused - some 28 years ago, Matthew McConaughey’s dad, a towering force in his life, suddenly died. Matthew had to figure out a way to keep showing up, to keep going. His mantra became “just keep livin,” which has become a guiding ethos, a sort of lens through which he lives his life. Now, nearly three decades later, an Academy Award-winning actor, icon in the industry, married father of three, a master raconteur, entrepreneur, philanthropist, and endless creator of moments and adventures, Matthew lives life as an eternal amateur. Fiercely himself in all parts of life, ever-curious and open, he seeks experiences, wisdom, and insights, always learning, always asking, always seeking, that give him some semblance of understanding what makes life worth living.  Much of his journey, his take on life, fatherhood, acting, love, family and contribution is offered up in his beautiful and moving new memoir, Greenlights (https://greenlights.com/). It’s a philosophical and poetic window into the experiences and moments that shaped him and continue to awaken him to what matters most, drawn from 50 years of living, and some 36 years of diaries. That quest - to figure what a life well-lived looks like - is one we both have in common, and it’s probably why in today’s conversation we jump into the deep end of the pool fast, exploring everything from nature and solitude to family, love, struggle, character, uncertainty, creation, the sacred nature of being in the spaces in between devastation and wild success, how the moment we’re all in has shifted his thinking and what the future we all being called to co-create might look like, and so much more. That’s what you’ll hear. But here’s what was happening that you couldn’t see. As we spoke, Matthew sat at his desk, reading glasses on, and pen and paper in hand. Minutes into the conversation, he began writing, taking notes, regularly jotting down ideas, phrases, and insights, piecing together puzzles in real-time. Ever the seeker, a perpetual student of life, present in the moment, and open to whatever it might bring. You can find Matthew McConaughey at: Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/officiallymcconaughey/) Check out offerings & partners:  Plushcare: PlushCare.com/GOODLIFE. Glossier: Glossier.com/podcast/GOODLIFE - 10% off your first order Air Doctor: airdoctorpro.com - code GOODLIFE - 35% off
1 hr 44 min
Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson
Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson
Forrest Hanson, Rick Hanson, Ph.D.
Sadness and Disappointment Around the Holidays
The holidays are coming up, and for many people they’re likely to be very different this year from usual. Experiencing sadness or disappointment around the holidays is normal even among the best circumstances, and we're far from those. On this episode, Dr. Hanson and Forrest explore how to work with this year's natural feelings of sadness and disappointment. Support the Podcast: We're on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link. Key Topics: 4:50: A therapy session focused on sadness with Rick. 9:30: Associations between current sad experiences and our past material. 11:45: A process for experiencing and working with sadness. 17:45: Imagery to aid experiencing. 19:00: Helping sadness soften and release. 24:30: Non-judgement 28:40: Identifying underlying beliefs. 29:40: Letting in good experiences alongside challenging ones. 33:10: Finding the root experience, and communicating our needs. 37:00: Sadness vs. depression. 41:30: Dealing with disappointment. 45:00: Finding agency in a moment of disappointment. 48:10: “Strong hopes, weak expectations.” 50:20: Recap. _Foundations of Well-Being:_ For over 35 years, Dr. Rick Hanson has taught thousands of people how to feel less stressed, have more fulfilling relationships, and find a deep sense of self-worth. He's now sharing the lessons of a lifetime in one step-by-step, down-to-earth online program: The Foundations of Well-Being. _Sponsors:_ Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world’s largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month! Want to sleep better? Try the legendary Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription. Connect with the show: * Subscribe on iTunes * Follow us on Instagram * Follow Rick on Facebook * Follow Forrest on Facebook * Forrest's Website
53 min
The Doctor's Kitchen Podcast
The Doctor's Kitchen Podcast
Dr Rupy Aujla
#79 The Keto Series (Part 2 of 2), How Keto Saved My Child with Alex Ash
A slightly different podcast episode today to give an authentic human experience of what effect a ketogenic diet could have in certain circumstances - we’re talking with Alex Ash, a colleague of one of my best friends in America, who reached out to me a while ago wanting to share his personal experience with the use of a Ketogenic diet for his son’s medical condition. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a severe form of childhood epilepsy with multiple types of seizures and as you’ll hear, Alex and his partners experience has not been a straight forward one in the slightest. For any of you listening with children, with or without a chronic condition, I just want to say from the outset that this episode could be triggering so I would exercise some caution if you do not want to listen.  Alex’s story has a positive ending but I understand this is not the case for a lot of people struggling with epilepsy and many other conditions. As a medical doctor I witness the daily battle many parents and carers have to endure for the sake of their loved ones. As always, none of the information spoken about on today’s podcast is taken to be medical advice, always speak with your practitioner about changes to medication, dietary or supplement regimen.  And there are a few explanations for how the keto diet may yield an effect offered by Alex that are not technically accurate, but for the purposes of this special podcast I’ve chosen to completely unedit our conversation. If you’re interested in the more nuanced opinion of a practitioner I would listen to the previous podcast with Sue Wood that I've linked here for you. I hope you enjoy listening to Alex tell Jachin’s story, it’s certainly hit home a lot of truths to me. Remember to check out The Doctor's Kitchen website where you can find full show notes and social media links for this episode   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
1 hr 15 min
The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast
The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast
Shannon Crow
195: LGBTQ Awareness for Yoga Teachers with Tristan Katz
The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast 195: LGBTQ Awareness for Yoga Teachers with Tristan Katz Description: We can all agree that we want our yoga classes to be safe places for everybody. However, one group of marginalized people who are often not taken into consideration is the LGBTQ community. The LGBTQ community has historically been persecuted and has experienced violence, at the provincial or state, national, institutional and personal levels, which makes it all the more important for us to create and maintain safe and inclusive spaces for them in our classes. How can we bring awareness about them to our yoga spaces, and create inclusive safe spaces for them? Tristan Katz (they/them) has some insights to give us a better understanding of the LGBTQ community, based on their personal lived experience and their work in the space of equity-inclusion. Tristan is a business and marketing coach-consultant, web and graphic designer based in Portland, OR. Part of Tristan’s intention in their work is to support teachers, practitioners, studios, and spiritual communities seeking to facilitate safer, braver spaces. To this end, Tristan is currently studying with experts in the field to expand their equity-inclusion facilitation and education offerings, in addition to teaching workshops and trainings centered around queer identity and LGBTQ+ awareness with an anti-oppression and intersectional lens. Conversations around creating such inclusive spaces for people in the LGBTQ commmunity can be uncomfortable, and we may not always know how to approach this topic. Tristan speaks openly and honestly to share more about the experiences people in this community have, and how we can do better. They give us a breakdown of common terms, cues and language; what we as yoga teachers can do to be more aware and inclusive in our classes, and what to do when we mess up, which is something that will inevitably happen. For anyone looking to learn more about how to create more inclusive spaces in their yoga classes, this episode is a must-listen. Key Takeaways: [10:18] Shannon introduces her guest for this episode - Tristan Katz. [12:28] Where did Tristan's yoga journey begin and how did it lead them to the work that they do now? [18:28] Tristan defines some terms they have used as well as appropriate language to use to create inclusive spaces. [25:26] What is Tristan's response to yoga teachers who may be worried that introducing pronouns in their yoga classes may cause their students discomfort? [29:45] Tristan explains a little more about trans identity and the gender binary. [31:51] When asking for someone's pronouns, avoid saying "preferred pronouns". Tristan shares why. [34:20] Shannon and Tristan discuss how to approach people who have multiple pronouns e.g. she/ they. [38:52] Grammar is not an issue when using they/them pronouns for individuals! It is an argument that is rooted in transphobia. [40:49] Some cues and language in yoga classes tend to be gendered. How does Tristan help yoga teachers navigate this? [44:31] Tristan shares how they consciously and intentionally focus on acknowledging that everyone's experiences are different and being sensitive to that. [46:34] How do niches that focus exclusively on one particular gender feel to non-binary people? [51:02] If you offer inclusivity trainings, or have taken one that you appreciated, please share it in the comments. [52:02] What are Tristan's thoughts on how to express ourselves such that everyone feels included and safe? [57:01] Societal systems and structures impact all of us differently, depending on our identities, but that doesn't mean we can't all be part of different movements to dismantle these toxic structures. [59:17] Shannon shares some of her experiences with creating inclusive spaces in the world. [1:01:21] Apart from their work with equity-inclusion, Tristan is also a digital strategist who supports yoga teachers in their businesses. [1:03:18] Shannon shares her key takeaways from this interview with Tristan. Links: * Tristan Katz * LGBTQ Awareness: For Yoga Teachers, by Tristan Katz * LGBTQ Equity-Inclusion: Actionable Steps for Yoga Teachers, by Tristan Katz * Inclusivity Trainings by Tristan * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Episode 092: Accessible Yoga Begins with Language with Kesse Hodge, Chantel Ehler and Katie Juelson * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Episode 138: Accessible Yoga Beyond Asana with Jivana Heyman * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Episode 108: Inclusive Language for Prenatal Yoga with Shannon Crow * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Episode 146: How to Empower Your Yoga Students with Yonnie Fung * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Episode 189: Your Movement Science is Racist with Jesal Parikh * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Episode 173: Social Justice, Politics & Yoga with Chara Caruthers and Maria Kirsten * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Bonus Episode: Anti-Racism & Yoga with Michelle Johnson * Trans Yoga Project * Trans Yoga Project (Patreon) * Pelvic Health Professionals Gratitude to our Sponsor Schedulicity. . Quotes from this episode: "We all make assumptions based on appearances, but we can't know the truth of somebody's life experience or identity based on appearances." - Tristan "There is this level of toxicity that's in dominant culture that we often can bring into this yoga space unconsciously or consciously." - Tristan "When we're witnessing others' discomfort around that conversation, it's an opportunity for us to model and educate and inform." - Tristan "Gender is a much more nuanced conversation than we've all been taught." - Tristan "We can't just make these vast assumptions and generalizations. We're potentially putting people into sympathetic arousal when we do." - Tristan "Anytime you gender something, you're excluding some people in the room, you're potentially triggering other people in the room." - Tristan
1 hr 9 min
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
217: Ask David: Is human "worthwhileness" worthwhile? Why am I always the the last to find out about anything? A Daily Gratitude Log, Positive Reframing and more!
Today's Ask David features four terrific questions. * Kevin asks: Why is the concept of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? * Vallejo asks: Does the statement, "WHY AM I ALWAYS THE LAST ONE TO FIND OUT ABOUT ANYTHING?” correspond to overgeneralization, or self-blame? I’ve been listening to the early podcasts on the ten positive and negative cognitive distortions. * David P asks: Do you think there is anything to be gained from a daily gratitude log, to go along with the daily mood log? * Harvey asks: I don’t see how Positive Reframing actually contributes to the therapy. * Kevin asks: Why are the concepts of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? Hi David, I have a quick question about the concept of being a worthwhile human being. Suppose a person believes they are unconditionally worthwhile, what are the implications of this? Why are the concepts of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? Best Regards, Kevin Hi Kevin, Thanks! That’s a very important question. However, it is abstract and philosophical. I have found that philosophical discussions tend to go on endlessly with resolve. In contrast, when someone asks for help with a specific moment when she or he was upset, then I can usually show that person how to change the way she or he is feeling. And when that happens, the person generally suddenly “sees” the solution to some very profound philosophical or spiritual questions. All that being said, I’ll take a crack at it. The goal of TEAM therapy is not to go from thinking that you’re a worthless human being to thinking that you’re a worthwhile human being, but to give up these concepts as nonsensical. Specific activities, talents or thoughts can be more or less worthwhile, but a human being cannot be more or less worthwhile. We can judge specific events, actions, and so forth, but not humans. At least I am not aware of how to validly judge a human being, or a group of humans. We can only judge their actions, attitudes, thoughts, and so forth. Unconditional self-esteem is definitely better than conditional self-esteem, since you don’t have to be perfect or a great achiever or a great anything to be “worthwhile,” but you are still focused on being "worthwhile." I'm not sure what that means, but there is a downside, to my way of thinking. If you think you are worthwhile because you are a human being, does that mean that you are more worthwhile than animals? Lots of people abuse animals, hunt animals, and so forth, which many people find immensely disturbing. These are some of the consequences of thinking that animals are less worthwhile, for example. Not sure that helps, but like your line of questioning! David Kevin follows up: What is the implication then of giving up these concepts at all? I assume that thinking that you have unconditional worthwhileness because you are alive or to drop these concepts entirely have the same emotional implications for people. What are these implications? For example, if I think that worthwhileness and worthlessness are meaningless concepts, so what? What’s the point? What do I gain? Hi Kevin, Let me start by saying, once again, that I am not an evangelist spreading the “gospel,” so to speak. My goal is simply to help people who are struggling with feelings of depression, anxiety, and self-doubt. So, if your way of thinking about things is working for you, there’s no reason to change. But my focus is always on someone who is suffering, and that’s where these concepts can sometimes be important. I can tell you what I gained by giving up the idea that I could be, or needed to be “worthwhile” or “special.” I gained a great deal of joy. It was a lot like escaping from a mental prison. It freed me to find incredible joy in the “ordinary” events of my daily life. It also freed me from fears of “failure” or not being “good enough.” Depression always results from Overgeneralization--you generalize from failing at something specific to thinking you are a failure as a human being. Without Overgeneralization, I think it is safe to say that it is impossible to be depressed. For example, if you measure your worthwhileness based on your achievements and success, you may feel excited when you succeed and devastated or anxious when you fail, or when you are in danger of failing. I'm not sure if this addresses your excellent question! A young woman told herself that she was "unloveable" when she and her boyfriend broke up after two years of going together. Can you see that she thinks she has a "self" that can be "loveable" or "unloveable?" This thought was very disturbing to her, as you might imagine. Relationships do not break up because someone is "unloveable," but because of specific factors or events that drive people apart. Once you zero in on why the relationship failed, or more correctly, why the two of you broke up, then you can pinpoint the causes and learn and grow so you can make your next relationship even better. There are tons of specific reasons why people break up! But if you think that you’re “unloveable,” or tell yourself that the relationship was “a failure,” then you may get stuck in a morass of negative feelings. But it’s not even true that the relationship was a failure.” That’s All-or-Nothing Thinking, since all relationships are a mixture of more or less successful aspects. You could even tell yourself that a “failed” relationship was a partial success, since you successfully learned that this isn’t the person you’re going to spend the rest of your life with. What’s in it for you to give up Overgeneralization and All-or-Nothing Thinking, as well as the concepts of being a “worthwhile” or “worthless” human being? That’s a decision each person can make. There are benefits as well as problems with these ways of thinking. For example, let’s say you’re depressed and think of yourself as “defective.” This is a common negative thought, and it is based on the idea that a human being could be more or less worthwhile, or thinking that your "self" can be judged or rated. So, you could do two Cost-Benefit Analyses. * * First, you could list the advantages and disadvantages of thinking of yourself as a “defective” human being. Then balance the advantages against the disadvantages on a 100-point scale, assigning the larger number to the list that seems more important or desirable. * Second, you could list the advantages and disadvantages of thinking of yourself as a human being with defects, and once again balance the list of advantages against the disadvantages on a 100-point scale. This is just a subtle change in semantics, but the emotional implications can sometimes be pretty powerful. As I mentioned at the top, philosophical debates are just debates. Fun, perhaps, but not terribly useful. I’m more interested in magic, or miracles. That’s what happens at the moment of profound change, which can ONLY happen by focusing on one specific moment when you felt upset and needed help. When you do that, everything becomes radically different, and real change can occur. And at that magic moment of change, the solutions to all of the problems of philosophy will often suddenly become crystal clear. Or, to put it differently, the philosophical debates will suddenly become, without meaning to sound harsh, almost a waste of previous time. Our current semi-feral cat loves my wife, but is only starting to trust me, so I’ve been working at gaining her trust and learning to understand her non-verbal and somewhat complex efforts to communicate. Yesterday she roller over on her back and stretch out her front and back paws to expose her tummy to the max, and she let me pet her tummy for quite a long time, purring loudly the whole time. I don’t car…
1 hr 2 min
Slo Mo: A Podcast with Mo Gawdat
Slo Mo: A Podcast with Mo Gawdat
Mo Gawdat
Helen Tupper - Embrace the Squiggly Career Path and Cage Your Confidence Gremlins
Helen Tupper is the co-founder and CEO of Amazing If, co-author of The Squiggly Careers, and the co-host of the Squiggly Careers podcast. She dedicates herself to helping people and organizations succeed through the unpredictable - or “squiggly” - nature of a career path. Helen describes herself as a positive force for good...work. I highly recommend the Squiggly Careers podcast. Each week, Helen and her co-founder and co-host, Sarah Ellis, take a work challenge and share tips and tools to help you with it. From looking for a new job to dealing with a difficult colleague, this podcast is incredibly useful. There are over 180 episodes ready for you to listen to and you can search for and subscribe to future Squiggly Careers episodes wherever you get your podcasts.  Helen and Sarah are brilliant, and this interview with Helen will give you a small taste of their potentially life changing advice on how to really assess your career and, eventually, thrive in a happy one. Listen as we discuss: * How Helen loved her jobs and wanted to do more outside the job to be better at it, but this was a hard sell for management * The meaning of a "squiggly career", and what Helen's has looked like * The mission of Squiggly Careers: make career support accessible to everyone * A linear career never goes backwards, but a squiggly career can go any direction * The combination of "What do I value?" + "What am I good at?" * Build confidence and gain insight into your strengths to find your career path * How to tame the "confidence gremlins" that stick us to limiting beliefs * Judge yourself in the way you judge other people * My own squiggly career, and how I thrived in the corporate world * What exactly is a "career"? * The historical origins of the career ladder * Should you quit your job if it's not meeting your values? * How to engage in Active Rest * Staying resilient in trying times for careers everywhere Instagram: @mo_gawdat Facebook: @mo.gawdat.official Twitter: @mgawdat LinkedIn: /in/mogawdat Connect with Helen Tupper on Instagram @amazingif, Facebook @amazingif, on Twitter @helentupper, and on her website, amazingif.com Don't forget to subscribe to Slo Mo for new episodes every Monday and Thursday. Only with your help can we reach One Billion Happy #onebillionhappy.
50 min
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