Checking In and What We’re Loving
Play • 25 min

A shorter episode focused on what we’ve been enjoying reading, watching and listening to during these strange times and how we’re trying to keep happy and productive.


Poem: The Rainbow Children, Gemma Peacock 

 

Books: 

  • Playing to win, A. G. Larfley and Roger L. Martin
  • Different: Escaping the Competitive Herd, Youngme Moon
  • When Breath Becomes Air, Paul Kalanithi
  • Any Human Heart, William Boyd 
  • Educated, Tara Westover 
  • A Monk’s Guide to Happiness, Gelong Thubten 

 

TV Show:

  • Unorthodox, Netflix 

 

Podcast


 

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Going for Goal
Going for Goal
Women's Health UK
How To Rebuild Your Body Confidence with Danae Mercer
When it comes to things like self-esteem and body confidence, good influences don’t come much better than today’s guest. Danae Mercer is a journalist-turned-Instagram sensation who demonstrates self-love and body-acceptance to her 2.2 million followers. She exposes the fakery that brands use while flogging diet products online and has made it her mission to help women the world over love themselves a little more and judge themselves a little less - cellulite and stretch marks included. In today’s episode she opens up about her teenage struggles with anorexia, the problem with always looking at your face with a filter and her tips on how women can cultivate a stronger, more resilient relationship with their bodies - for themselves, the women around them, and the next generation. Join Danae on Instagram: @danaemercer Join Roisín on Instagram: @roisin.dervishokane Join Women’s Health on Instagram: @womenshealthuk Topics * Danae’s eating disorder recovery story * Why it's important to understand the artifice of social media perfection * Why there’s no 'right' way to celebrate your body on social media * The problem with using beauty filters all the time * Why teens’ body image battle is every woman’s fight Like what you’re hearing? We'd love if you could rate and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, as it really helps other people find the show. Also, remember to subscribe wherever you get your podcasts, so you’ll never miss an episode. Got a goal in mind? Shoot us a message on Instagram putting ‘Going for Goal’ at the start of your message and our experts could be helping you get where you want to be in an upcoming episode. Alternatively, you can email us: womenshealth@womenshealthmag.co.uk   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
35 min
My Menopause Doctor | Dr Louise Newson | Newson Health Menopause & Wellbeing Centre
My Menopause Doctor | Dr Louise Newson | Newson Health Menopause & Wellbeing Centre
Dr Louise Newson (Newson Health)
088 Endometriosis and the Menopause - Chris Mann & Dr Louise Newson
In this podcast, Dr Louise Newson is joined by Chris Mann, a consultant gynaecologist and one of the world's leading experts in endometriosis. Chris has received extensive training in many countries in the surgical treatment of endometriosis from some of the world's leading laparoscopic surgeons. He talks to Dr Newson about this condition, which affects around 10% of women and explains how, for many women, it takes seven years for a diagnosis. Far too many women do not seek medical help and those that do are often dismissed and given inappropriate advice or treatment. Chris and Dr Newson talk about the different treatment options available for endometriosis and how women with endometriosis can be given different types of HRT during the perimenopause and menopause. He recommends that any woman who is not receiving adequate help should persevere and see another doctor. We are releasing this podcast the first week in March to coincide with Endometriosis Awareness Month. Taking place across the world, Endometriosis Month exists to help increase awareness and highlight the symptoms of this debilitating condition that affects an estimated 176 million women worldwide. Chris Mann's Three Take Home Tips: * If you suspect that you may have endometriosis and the symptoms are negatively impacting your life then please seek help. Too many women suffer in silence. * If you are not getting anywhere with your GP then you can ask for a second opinion. If you still are not getting the right help then book a private consultation with a specialist, if you can afford it. A specialist can then write to your GP and advise them on your treatment going forward. * Don't give up! For too long, too many women have been fobbed off. It isn't something to just 'put up with' and there are now more of us out there that want to help. Visit Chris Mann's website: https://www.theendometriosisclinic.com/christopher-mann/
32 min
How to Love Your Body
How to Love Your Body
The Body Love Society
Ep 138 - 3 worst diets disguising themselves as intuitive eating in 2021
Today we are rating and reviewing the 3 worst diets disguised as intuitive eating in 2021. Lets dive right in because we have lots to discuss: Coming in third place: * 2B Mindset This is a diet (yes a diet) from Beachbody. The creator has her own weight loss story and uses this to sell the program. A lot of the messaging does sound so appealing – never be hungry and still lose weight, live your life and still lose weight, it sounds so good. Honestly even when I read it I have a moment of hope. But then the truth comes crashing in. Here are some other things that it says: * What to eat first at every meal to lose weight * What to order first at a restaurant to lose weight * “Dozens of my proven weight loss secrets” , if anyone ever promotes their weight loss program or tips as secrets – they lying. Anything that actually worked would be such big news it would not be a secret. * Then it says “results may vary based on starting point, effort and following Beachbody’s exercise and healthy eating plan” – okay soooo a diet. * Then it says it again – get my secrets to results that last a lifetime. If its a secret its a lie. * Then as we go into the website you see that she also has packages that include the beachbody shakes – it gets more diety the deeper you dig. And this is all to say: WE KNOW this sounds appealing for many, this is the problem. Diets disguise themselves as not diets, as something different and this is what leads people down the road an extra 5 years thinking – oh maybe this ones the answer, maybe this one…. It’s really harmful. We want to confirm that this is a diet and pursuing weight loss leads to the same results no matter the name of it. Runner up is: Intuitive Fasting It is advertised as: “A clear but flexible, four week plan combining intuitive eating with intermittent fasting and Ketotarian foods. It’s designed to optimize our wellbeing and set us up to feel our best for all the other weeks to come. This is not a book of dogma. It will not punish you or restrict you. “ You’ll notice these are ALL buzz words and this description doesn’t really say anything. Dr. Will Cole, the author of this book (who is not a medical doctor by the way, he is a quote “leader in functional medicine – his bio on instagram says intuitive fasting + ketotarian + inflammation spectrum (the buzz words that mean nothing.. honestly). The contradictions here are astounding: Dr. Will Cole says – Not everyone is created equal- The realization that everyone is created differently. There is not a one-size-fits-all approach to getting well. What works for one person can flare other’s triggers. To treat symptoms and ailments, functional medicine uses herbal botanical medicine, lifestyle modifications, supplements and medications when needed to regain health. Yet I have written a 4 week plan that you should all BUY! There is no such thing as intuitive fasting. This is like saying be a vegetarian and eat meat – nope not possible. No matter how hard you sell it. The word intuitive is used here because they know that intuitive eating is on the rise in popularity and strict diets are on the outs. What it actually is: This program is actually just 3 of the more popular ways of eating right now, intermittent fasting, intuitive eating and keto (obviously one of these things is not like the other) – and smashing them together to sell something. This program is nothing new, there is nothing intuitive about it and it’s in fact very harmful. Diets suck. We know that. AND the reason these specific diets are the most harmful is because they are a wolf in sheep’s clothing. People who are embarking on the journey to become an intuitive eater often still want to lose weight – so someone coming along and saying Hey, don’t worry you can be intuitive-ish and still fast and eat keto, don’t worry. You can be intuitive AND lose weight. This is predatory and honestly really scary. The key issue here is knowing how to determine if something is legitimately IE or not – ANYTHING with any food rules (including when you can eat) it is not authentic to this work. I think sometimes we almost WISH that it was real – I can find food freedom AND embark on a quest to manipulate my food intake and my body? It’s safe, it’s what we know, but it just won’t get you to where you want to go. The winner of the worst diet disguising itself as intuitive eating is … * Noom Why is this the winner? It’s the sneakiest one AND the most successful. Noom is a HUGE company at this point. Founded in 2008 by two engineers (yes, engineers, not psychologists like its advertised) , Saeju Jeong and Artem Petakov, Noom is a personalized health coaching company with its own app. Noom has over 50 million members and has raised over $114 million in investment capitol. And what’s so great about it? Why is it so successful? The reason Noom has done so well is because of it’s marketing, it claims to be a psychology based approach to losing weight for good and don’t forget its not a diet (WINK). One of their slogans is “Don’t go on a diet, go on Noom.” The app claims to help you to learn to eat mindfully and that using psychology you will lose the weight once and for all. There are 2 options you can take when starting Noom – they are, lose weight for good and Get fit for good, note that for the Get fit for good option you still have to choose a weight loss goal soooo not sure how these are different. Luckily you cannot enter a goal weight that when calculated with your height is not considered underweight however for many people the lowest weight they can reach while still being considered in the “healthy weight” range according to BMI can still be a weight that is unhealthy for that person so although these parameters are in place it just isn’t enough to keep people safe. They claim to not be a restrictive diet but once you enter the program you are allotted a certain amount of calories based on how much weight you want to lose and how fast you want to lose it. They also market themselves as being something you only have to do for 10 minutes a day…. Okay maybe you’re only on the app for 10 minutes a day but when you count up all the meals you make, the meals you track, the workouts you do, the workouts you track and then on top of that dealing with food preoccupation and always thinking about the weight loss, what is the actual time this takes? If you are a dieter or used to be a dieter you know it’s not that simple. Again the danger in this program is that IT DOES look so good. As you go through the process of signing up and answering questions it has a graphic that shows your goal weight getting closer and closer (it did this no matter how I answered the questions). It makes it seem like, it’s so close, this is so possible for me. Here is some conflicting messaging that shows that this whole “not a diet” thing is just very smart marketing. “We all fall off the wagon sometimes. We’ll help you get back on track” – if this isn’t a diet, how can there be a wagon? They share some great information on why restrictive dieting is bad: Why restrictive diets fail – (the “Yo-Yo” effect) Columbia University reports that 73% of dieters experience at least one weight cycling episode The Mayo Clinic reports more “Yo-Yo” cycles increases diabetes risk and amounts of belly fat But then THEY are a restrictive diet – with calorie allotments, meal tracking and red, green and yellow foods, saying which foods are good, ok and bad BUT since they ALLOW all the foods it’s not restrictive. But if you put a bad label on a food and limit the calories how are you meant to include these foods into this program? This is restriction- both mental and physical. This information was provided by someone who has done the program: (No we were not going to do thi…
1 hr 2 min
The Eating Disorder Recovery Podcast
The Eating Disorder Recovery Podcast
Tabitha Farrar
Thanks for Listening!
I've not written a blog for months. I've been moving house, had little internet connection, and been generally busy, and tired. I'm glad that this past couple of weeks I had felt like I have the time and space to start writing again, so there will be blogs to come, soon. I wanted to put something down to express my gratitude for all of you who have listened to and supported my podcast over the past three years. I didn't think that it would go anywhere, or that anyone would really listen to it. Well, you did. So thank you. I've had such support for the podcast, that I feel extremely guilty about announcing that I will not be producing any more episodes. But, as I discovered in the last 6 months or so, feeling guilty about stopping is not a good enough reason to keep going. I'd rather than stop completely than keep it going, but only publish episodes sporadically. Podcasts are a lot of work. Finding people to interview, scheduling interviews, and editing audio after interviews. If I am quick, an episode may take 6 hours start to finish (including scheduling etc), but many episodes take more like 10. It is a time thing. It's not that I don't have time. I can always make time. These days, my "free" time — time to do absolutely nothing productive at all — is increasingly precious and glorious to me. I am growing less inclined to give it up. I'm more selfish about my time — unapologetically, I enjoy that I enjoy being just me, without being the 'doing stuff' me. This 'wanting to do nothing' is actually exactly something that scared me when I had anorexia. I was scared that if I allowed myself to rest, I would always want to rest. I would forget how to be productive. My 'value' would decrease. Because when I was sick, I thought my value was in my ability to never rest, and always be productive. (Which, if you think about it, in a famine, would be about right.) The wonderful thing about being human in a brain that doesn't have anorexia any more, doesn't perceive that resources are scarce, and therefore doesn't believe that value is in productivity, is that I have the freedom to see the real value of being human. I know that sounds incredibly deep and ridiculous, but it is true. The other night, I was going to make this podcast. I had an hour or so. I was making my way up my back porch steps, and one of the puppies followed me up and "pawed" me on the leg, asking for attention. Years ago, when my value was in being productive, I either wouldn't have noticed him, or I would have noticed him, and gone inside anyway. These days, I'm more inclined to sit on the floor and play with the dogs because they asked than I am to go inside and start editing audio. Sometimes it is a puppy. Sometimes it is a horse. Sometimes it is a pattern that the wind has made in the snow that I need to stare at. Sometimes, very often, it is snuggling with Matt. I never take for granted my recovered brain. A brain that allows me to see the value in happiness, and being human. Never, ever, take it for granted. I feel blessed to have known a brain in starvation mode, if only because it allows me to know the bliss of not being there. Anyway. That's my way of saying there will be no more podcasts. Just because it is the right time to stop. I appreciate you for listening.
7 min
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