How Laughter Can Be The Best Medicine
Play • 34 min

With the world feeling increasingly uncertain and scary, finding the humour in life can often be a struggle but in this week's episode, Ella talks to author Naomi Bagdonas about why it's more important than ever. Despite seeming like a frivolous thing, they explore how humour has the power to actually connect us more as humans as well as the science on why it can impact our physical and mental health and ultimately our wellbeing.


Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas: Humour, Seriously

 

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Going for Goal
Going for Goal
Women's Health
Michelle Keegan on Past Fitness Fails and How She Found Healthy
This week’s episode of Going for Goal is a joyful January catch up between Women’s Health Editor-in-Chief Claire Sanderson and this month’s cover star, Michelle Keegan. The Brassic actress and bonafide national treasure chats about finding her groove with fitness and food - and shares her current workout formula. And while she’s in a great place with her lifestyle now, Michelle opens up about a time when she was training harder, but definitely not smarter. They also discuss the new positive habits Michelle has picked up in 2020 and how the past year has shifted her outlook when it comes to maintaining her relationships with friends and family. Oh, and there’s probably a good few minutes on her favourite snacks, too. So, if you are trying to keep a lid on the amount of between-meals morsels you’re consuming, maybe don’t listen when you’re peckish. Join Michelle on Instagram: @michkeegan Join Claire on Instagram: @clairesanderson Join Women’s Health UK on Instagram: @womenshealthuk Topics  * Michelle’s exact workout formula  * What Michelle used to get wrong with fitness * The social media boundary that’s made Michelle happier * Michelle’s favourite foods + ideal day * How 2020 made Michelle fall for nature Like what you’re hearing? We'd love if you could rate and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, as it really helps other people find the show. Also, remember to subscribe wherever you get your podcasts, so you’ll never miss an episode.  Got a goal in mind? Shoot us a message on Instagram putting ‘Going for Goal’ at the start of your message and our experts could be helping you achieve your health goal in an upcoming episode. Alternatively, you can email us: womenshealth@womenshealthmag.co.uk   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26 min
The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style
The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style
Shannon Ables
299: How to Live a Life with Less Stress & Why It's Vital for Good Health
"The lack of meaning in our lives stresses us out, but too much stress makes it harder to find meaning." —Dr. Rangan Chatterjee, author of The Stress Solution Yesterday, for the entire day, aside from letting my pups outside from time to time and feeding them, I wallpapered. I turned on old British cosy mysteries (Poirot with David Suchet), and went to town (hopefully) transforming my primary bedroom from a gray space to a French/English Countryside cottage space. After such focused projects, I sleep deeply. Stress? Nonexistent. Dr. Rangan Chatterjee explains in The Stress Solution how when you've found something you love "time, and even you sense of self, will seem to vanish when you're busy with it." Yep, this is the 'flow state' we've heard so much about. Your emotional brain finds it difficult to grab your attention as your rational brain is being fully encouraged to grow he further teaches. All of this is to say, any negative thoughts, cannot grab hold because you are intently engrossed in something your full attention needs to be engaged with. Dr. Chatterjee shares more specifically as psycholoist Mihaly Csikszemtimihalyi (who coined the phrase - flow state) found, flow is only fully reached when we are challenged. Which makes it all the more important to find something to give your attention to regularly you not only love doing but also steadily gives you the opportunity to grow. All of this is to say, we can alleviate and solve the problem of unnecessary stress in our lives. And when we do so, not only will our overall health improve - in the short and long term, but we will deepen the daily contentment we experience and improve our everyday lives. Part of struggle in America with eradicating stress is whether the culture will admit it or not, it (and I am choosing a non-human pronoun intentionally as we unhelpfully give the culture control over our lives as though we cannot change it - as though it is concrete) thrives when we are stressed. Economically, when people need something, or feel they need something (remember 'false needs' from episode #298), they feel inadequate or lacking, so they do or buy or change which requires 'something else' which keeps us out of the present moment. Back to the pronoun of it to describe the culture which we think we don't have control over. We do. Morrie Schwartz, the man of insightful wisdom about living and dying well introduced to readers through Mitch Albom's book Tuesdays with Morrie, expressed and beautifully exemplified the need to cultivate your own culture if the one presented by the world does not work for you. "Morrie, true to these words, had developed his own culture—long before he got sick. Discussion groups, walks with friends, dancing to his music in the Harvard Square church. He started a project called Greenhouse, where poor people could receive mental health services. He read books to find new ideas for his classes, visited with his colleagues, kept up with old students, wrote letters to distant friends. he took more time eating and looking at nature and wasted no time in front of TV sitcoms . . . he had created a cocoon of human activities—conversations, interations, affection—and it filled his life like an overflowing soup bowl." —Mitch Albom, Tuesdays with Morrie Alleviating our lives of stress will take courage - in grand, but many seemingly small ways, practiced every day until they become a healthy habit of being present. So how can we resolve the stress problem? Dr. Chatterjee has created an acronym L.I.V.E. * L —Do Something You Love, find your flow state and engage in it regularly (often) * I — Do Something With Intent, be present fully in each day and revel in the pleasures of the little details of life which are everywhere if only we'd look. Being present enables our sight to improve and thus elevate the quality of our everyday experience. (I share an example of one such everyday moment in the conclusion of this post.) * V — Develop a Long-Term Vision, Chatterjee sites Viktor Frankl, an Austrian psychiatrist whose approach to psychiatry, the world of psychiatry calls the third school following Freud and Adler. Frankl’s theory is that “the primary motivation of an individual is the search for meaning in life and that the primary purpose of psychotherapy should be to help the individual find that meaning.” Frankl, having survived Auschwitz, found the key difference was the ability to focus on what needed to be done to live because he had a sense of purpose, a long-term goal. Chatterjee sums up, "When we know the 'why' of our lives, we automatically reduce our stress load. Research indicates that we're able to endure short-term struggles with much more resilience if they're helping us achieve our long-term goals." * E —Do Something That Makes You Engage With Others, the engagement need not be a large social event, in fact, the engagement Dr. Chatterjee references is of giving to others - doing something that is helpful, useful, contributing positively in some way that is meaningful to someone else, someone who may really need what you can give. Of course, there are MANY other choices and habits needed in our daily lives to reduce our stress and Dr. Chatterjee details them all with helpful specifics to incorporate into your routine. Below is a general list: * First and most important: Find your purpose and meaning. How? "Find periods of calm space to stop and think and then pursue one or more new activities that you are passionate about . . . People with a strong sense of purpose enjoy significantly better health compared to those who don't including less likelihood of developing heart disease, strokes and depression. Research also shows that they sleep better and live longer . . . and live happier lives." * Discover your raison d'être (reason for being). Give yourself the time to come to understand your true purpose, not society's, not your parents', not your spouse's, not your boss's. (explore TSLL's 2nd book to unearth your unique journey and direction) * Get enough sleep each night (what is 'enough'? what you need to leave you refreshed and rested when you wake up) * Prioritize regular exercise - aerobic, strength and mental (yoga, meditation, etc.) * Eat a diverse, rich, whole, unprocessed diet of food - Eat the Alphabet he emphasizes on p. 144 in the book * Find time to be intimate with those you love and care about - put down your phone more often and have 3D connections - eyes, touch, voice. * Exercise your gratitude muscle every day - journal at the end of every day or anytime for 2-3 minutes, and ponder the 3-Ps - Person, Pleasure and Promise (someone who you are grateful for from your current day; something that brought you pleasure - a cup of tea, a beautiful memory made with someone; think about something that holds promise for a beautiful tomorrow/future) * Attentively select the soundtrack of your days - relaxing music, silence, turning down the 'noise' * Let yourself feel your feelings - have a good cry if that is what you need and then follow with deep breaths afterwards to move through whatever needs to be released. * Find healthy ways to release stress - becoming self-aware and strengthening your emotional intelligence will enable you to notice when you are stressed. Often, it is simply paying attention to how you are breathing. Have ready practices which help you to reduce or release what has built up (such as the item mentioned above - have a good cry). Having a good uncontrollable laugh for example or coming back to your breath and breathing deeply. * Create healthy rhythms in your daily life - sleep, eating, exercising, connecting, winding down * Limit your time on your smart phone and especially social media sites - Dr. Chatterjee explains how with constant exposure to social media sites, he calls it 'Facebook Brain', our emotional brains become overreactive. "Your brain starts to…
35 min
Yoga Podcast
Yoga Podcast
Breezy Bree
YOGA CLASS: Balancing Worry with Gratitude Flow 70 Mins All-Levels ✨
Mantra: “I ____🕉 Asana: Inspired by Chakra: Root ♥️ I invite you to light a candle, have fresh water or herbal tea close by. If you practice with crystals, bring whatever inspires you. You can also bring a spiritual book or write an intention on your a piece of paper. Make this a mindful present moment. Welcome your awakening and continue to water the seeds of your growth by honoring those who came before you and whose blood flows through your body as you encourage life force energy, Prana to illuminate your body. Let’s prepare to open up our heart! May peace be with you today and always! Namaste! 🧘‍♀️I invite you to join a Teacher Training and immerse yourself into the philosophy of Yoga. 100% Online Yoga Alliance Approved until 12/31/2021 🧘🏽‍♂️📿www.myvinyasapractice.com 🧘‍♀️🎧Pick a Class & Press Play! NEW FEATURE *See Below* https://www.lovebreezybreeyoga.com/audio-yoga-classes Enjoy the class! Meet you on the mat! NAMASTE! Check out past episodes on my website! You can even search for key words! So excited! 🧡 https://www.lovebreezybreeyoga.com/podcast Check out past sequences here!  https://www.lovebreezybreeyoga.com/archives FREE YOGA SEQUENCES AVAILABLE!!! Check out my website for more info! www.lovebreezybreeyoga.com @yogapodcast FB: Breezy Bree Twitter @lovebreezybree IG: @yogapodcast & @lovebreezybree Credit: Listen to your ownbody’s infinite wisdom during practice, modify poses as you see fit. Grab your mat and a quiet place to listen as you begin your practice.  Props: Blocks, Blanket, Straps. Optional: Knee pads.  Listen to your own body’s infinite wisdom during practice, modify poses as you see fit. Grab your mat and a quiet place to listen as you begin your practice.  Props: Blocks, Blanket, Straps. Optional: Knee pads.  Breezy Bree E-RYT® 200, RYT® 500, YACEP® Style: Hatha, Vinyasa IAYT 500 Hour Certified Yoga Therapeutics Trauma-Informed Yoga 100 Hour Rocket Yoga 100 Hour https://www.yogaalliance.org/TeacherPublicProfile?tid=198124 Disclaimer: You are practicing at your own risk. Consult your doctor before beginning any exercise regime including Yoga and Pilates. This recording is for entertainment purposes only. Yoga Teacher is not responsible for any injuries, including death by the listener or practitioner. If you have health concerns contact a healthcare professional or a physician. Yoga Podcast is for Entertainment Purposes Only. www.lovebreezybreeyoga.com ---> Did you know you can listen on iTunes, Spotify & Stitcher? Download the Apps today & never miss an episode. Don’t forget to check out my new Yoga Pose Breakdown series and FREE Yoga Classes recorded during live studio practices for your personal practice, just listen & practice!  --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/yogapodcast/message
1 hr 10 min
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