#94: Susan Brennan COO of Bloom Energy
Play • 37 min

Susan Brennan is the Chief Operations Officer at Bloom Energy. Susan has more than 24 years of manufacturing experience, including automotive vehicle, powertrain, and components assembly, having also worked in executive roles leading manufacturing for Nissan and Ford.

In addition, she has created and supported organizations that encourage young women to pursue careers in math and science as a way to support future generations of technological manufacturing in the United States.

Discover more details here.

Some of the highlights of the episode:

  • From working with automotive giants to stepping into the startup world
  • Bloom’s initiatives in line with Industry 4.0
  • How was it is being a female in an executive role in manufacturing
  • Grooming female leaders
  • Taking calculated risks and taking on tough responsibilities

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Made You Think
Made You Think
Nat Eliason and Neil Soni
66: Making the Navalmanack: Interview with Eric Jorgenson
“Even today, what to study and how to study it are more important than where to study it and for how long. The best teachers are on the Internet. The best books are on the Internet. The best peers are on the Internet. The tools for learning are abundant. It’s the desire to learn that’s scarce.” - Naval Ravikant In this episode of Made You Think, Nat and Neil are joined by Eric Jorgenson. Eric is a writer, product strategist, and author of The Almanack of Naval Ravikant. We cover a wide range of topics including: * How Eric came to the idea of writing The Almanack * What Eric's biggest lessons and takeaways were from authoring this book * What topics didn't end up making the final cut * The future of education and online courses * The idea of leverage and how it can be used And much more. If you haven't already, make sure to check out our last episode where we talked in great depth about The Almanack and discussed our key takeaways from the book. Let us know what you think of this episode by sending a tweet to Nat, Neil, and Eric! Links from the Episode Mentioned in the show * Previous MYT Episode (0:35) * Naval on Shane Parrish's podcast (2:27) * Readwise (10:30) * Bonus Section: Education (27:07) * Building a Second Brain (32:22) * Lambda School (32:55) * How To Think Like Elon Musk - Made You Think Episode (44:37) * SpaceX (45:40) Books Mentioned * The Almanack of Naval Ravikant * Debt: The First 5000 Years (11:23) * Infinite Jest (13:58) (Nat's Book Notes) (Book Episode pt. 1) (Book Episode pt. 2) * Vagabonding (52:02) (Nat's Book Notes) People Mentioned * Naval Ravikant * Trevor McKendrick (7:38) * Elon Musk (41:41) * Tim Ferriss (50:40) Show Notes: 0:52 - Eric Jorgenson, author of The Almanack of Naval Ravikant, shares how his idea of writing the book came to be. 5:35 - From the start, Eric knew he didn’t want it to just be a summary book. How he was able to hone in on the writing style of the book to capture the interest of his readers all the way through. 9:20 - Highlight density. Using highlight data to estimate book quality. Skipping chapters and not finishing books. 14:14 - Eric’s key takeaways from the book and what knowledge he has carried away from writing it. The importance of equity, accountability and leverage. We have the tendency to want to do everything ourselves rather than to create systems and put the pieces together. 19:04 - How Twitter and other social media usage affects mindset and energy. Discussions of Naval’s Twitter usage and utilizing it as an outlet for his unfiltered thoughts and ideas. 21:56 - What were the communication patterns between Naval and Eric during the creation of The Almanack? 24:05 - The variety and depth of Naval’s ideas. Eric allowed himself to take time to dive in and explore these topics to let them sink in before writing about it. 26:02 - One topic that didn’t make the final cut was Education. Naval has talked about the flaws within the education system as well as the future of education. If you’re curious to read more, you can find that here! The rise of online courses and the potential for digital course creators. When you’re learning locally, you have the best person in the area teaching you. When you’re learning on a platform that’s global, you’ll be learning from the best of the best, plus increased accessibility. 32:44 - The future of online learning and career preparation is promising. How will the online course market grow within the upcoming decades? Tiktok education in the format of 60 second videos shot from your phone. 37:45 - English as the language of business and the history of the qwerty keyboard. 40:50 - If Eric could write about another influencer of thought, who would it be? 42:10 - Elon Musk, PayPal, Tesla, SpaceX. Writing a biography about Elon Musk: he has a hefty list of accomplishments but his principles and concepts are timeless. 48:24 - What do we know about Naval’s relationships and family? His ideas and concepts are what he is widely known for, so not much is known about his personal life. 53:53 - Eric’s next steps includes creating a course to help build a framework on this idea of leverage that Naval often speaks about. 57:01 - Leverage can be utilized at a personal, managerial, and company level in many different ways. Productivity of a company is no longer about how many employees there are. People leverage. 1:01:59 - Pick up a copy of The Almanack of Naval Ravikant on Amazon, follow Eric on Twitter, visit navalmanack.com, and follow along with upcoming projects on Eric's website! If you enjoyed this episode, let us know by leaving a review on iTunes and tell a friend. As always, let us know if you have any book recommendations! Find us on Twitter @TheRealNeilS and @nateliason. The best way to stay up to date on future episodes and show updates is to join our email list at Made You Think Podcast. Check out ways you can support the show here!
1 hr 3 min
The Learning & Development Podcast
The Learning & Development Podcast
David James
Lessons From 'The Line' Into L&D - with Paul Jocelyn
Working for so long in operational and senior leadership roles prior to a career in Learning & Development will shape anyone’s view of the value of L&D but also its potential. In this episode, this is discussed with Paul Jocelyn who had a 28 year career at Tesco, the first half in stores management and the second half at Head Office. KEY TAKEAWAYS Sometimes we are so focussed upon the goals in the near future, that we fail to recognise the monumental shifts we are a part of. Those of us in a more operational role prior to our joining the L&D world, have a rarer insight into the needs of others, and how learning can be better implemented. L&D itself is changing as the result of the way the working landscape in general has changed. As expectations change, so too must the way in which deliver solutions. The most effective learning always comes from the people who have walked the path before us. We learn far more from experience than we do from a handbook. BEST MOMENTS 'It was much more of a learning organisation that it gives itself credit for' 'Throughout that time it was an organisation that clearly pushed boundaries' 'Being in second place and wanting to overtake was very much part of the psyche early on' 'It was the experience, the3 environment and the challenges, rather than a handbook or a process flow' VALUABLE RESOURC ES The Learning And Development Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-learning-development-podcast/id1466927523 ABOUT THE GUEST Paul has more than 25 years of corporate senior leadership experience in Operations, Business Transformation, Marketing, Capability Building and Learning and Development in the UK and internationally.  As a consultant, advisor and speaker Paul works with organisations with the new challenges of:  How do we build a learning business – with the new capabilities and confidence we need to help us adapt and grow in a complex world? You can follow and connect with Paul via: Website: https://www.jocelynconsultingltd.co.uk Twitter:  @PaulJocelyn LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/pauljocelyn/ ABOUT THE HOST David James David has been a People Development professional for more than 20 years, most notably as Director of Talent, Learning & OD for The Walt Disney Company across Europe, the Middle East & Africa. As well as being the Chief Learning Strategist at Looop, David is a prominent writer and speaker on topics around modern and digital L&D as well as an active member of the CIPD L&D Advisory Board. CONTACT METHOD Twitter:  https://twitter.com/davidinlearning/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidjameslinkedin/ Website: https://www.looop.co/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
46 min
Curious Minds at Work
Curious Minds at Work
Gayle Allen
CM 181: Dan Cable On Unlocking Your Potential
For a good part of my life, I believed that focusing on my weaknesses was the key to achieving success. In fact, I didn't realize how much I'd embraced this way of thinking until I began working with an executive coach. Soon after we started working together, my coach made an observation I've never forgotten. She said, "Gayle, you're great at pointing out your weaknesses - all the ways you feel you don't measure up - but I never hear you talk about your strengths." That's when I realized how this way of thinking had become my default setting. I had to work hard to change it. That's why, when I picked up Dan Cable's latest book, Exceptional: Build Your Personal Highlight Reel and Unlock Your Potential, I knew I wanted to have him back on the show. He captured my old way of thinking with his first sentence, "Many of us think the best path to self-improvement is to face the cold truth about ourselves at our worst." Yet, what Dan quickly points out is that, far from motivating us, this relentless focus on identifying and fixing our weaknesses can create a lot of anxiety, along with feelings of overwhelm, even helplessness. That sounds like a far cry from a path to success, right? Dan's a Professor of Organizational Behavior at London Business School. Since his last book, Alive at Work, he's been studying what happens when we uncover our strengths through others' eyes, through current and former colleagues, bosses, friends, and family members. Dan's approach is fascinating and his research findings are incredible. Episode Links You Need a Personal Highlight Reel by Dan Cable What You Should Follow Instead of Your Passion by Dan Cable Stop Sleepwalking through Life by Dan Cable and Mel Bradman Alive at Work by Dan Cable Post-traumatic growth What Job Crafting Looks Like by Jane E. Dutton and Amy Wrzesniewski Impostor Syndrome Curious Minds at Work Learn more about creator and host, Gayle Allen, and producer and editor, Rob Mancabelli, here. Support Curious Minds at Work If you're a fan of the show, you can show your support by: Rating and reviewing the podcast on iTunes or wherever you subscribe. Telling someone about the show. Subscribing so you never miss an episode. Where to Find Curious Minds at Work Spotify iTunes Tunein Stitcher Google podcasts Overcast
54 min
The CMO Podcast
The CMO Podcast
Gallery Media Group Originals
Scott Rosenberg (Roku) | The Future of TV & Advertising Panel
Today's two-part episode starts with an interview with Scott Rosenberg, the SVP and GM of platform business for Roku Inc., the popular streaming-video platform and device maker. In this role, Scott oversees global app distribution, content acquisition and advertising. In this conversation, Jim and Scott discuss the future of the big screen and how advertising tools are becoming more sophisticated for streaming. He also talks about the biggest opportunities there are for marketers in streaming vs traditional broadcasting.  In the second part of this episode, Jim and Scott are joined with a panel of some of the biggest advertisers including: Emily Callahan - Chief Marketing & Experience Officer, ALSAC, the fundraising and awareness organization for St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Jackson Jeyanayagam - Vice President and General Manager of Direct-to-Consumer at The Clorox Company Quinn O'Brien - Vice President of Global Marketing and Brand at Lenovo Dino Bernacchi - Senior Vice President of Marketing at Cleveland Browns Amy Bonitatibus - Chief Marketing & Communications Officer at Chase Home Lending Todd Kaplan - Vice President of Marketing at PepsiCo This panel discussion focuses on how these companies are reaching their consumers through streaming and how they are creating advertising that resonates with cord-cutters.  Support our sponsor Deloitte and experience their guidance on resilience for brands in navigating the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn more at Deloitte.com.
1 hr 7 min
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
The "Perfect" Little Economy of New Zealand
This is new Zealand, a picturesque nation whos economy looks to exclusively rely on throwing their tourists off cliffs in increasingly imaginative ways and being left off of world maps. But Australia’s little brother is so much more than that and it might truely be the world’s best managed economy. Everything from the world banks ease of doing business index, from multiple quality of life assessments puts new zealand in the top spot. Move aside Norway. What’s more is that it has achieved this remarkable prosperity despite not having a huge supply of natural resources, or acting as some tax haven for global businesses like so many other apparent economic miracles we have explored before. No New Zealand has got to where it is today by carefully managing a market economy and providing a safe, stable and confidence inspiring place to start a family, a business, and a career. Of course there are still some problems and we will certainly get to them but after exploring the Economy of Argentina last week, it’s now time to get out your pen and paper and take notes on how to actually run an economy. And to do this as always we are going to break the economy into some important categories. What are the primary drivers of New Zealand's economic prosperity? How has the nation been able to accommodate these where other nations fail to do so? And what are the challenges the nation might face to keep this success going? Once thats all done we can then put New zealand on the economics explained national leaderboard.
18 min
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
Melina Palmer
141. Where CX and Behavioral Science Meet, interview with Jennifer Clinehens, author of Choice Hacking
Today I am so excited to introduce you to Jennifer Clinehens. She is currently CX Strategy Director at Havas CX Helia, London, where she uses behavioral science and psychology to improve the customer experience for brands like Lloyds Banking Group and Compare the Market. Jennifer has helped mold experiences with behavioral science for brands like McDonald's, AT&T, O2, and Adidas across the globe. She is also the author of four books including the one we will be discussing today, Choice Hacking: How to use psychology and behavioral science to create an experience that sings, AND she has two different podcasts, Choice Hacking and Everybody Hates Your Brand. Wow, talk about a busy and productive person, amirite? I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Show Notes: * [00:40] Today I am so excited to introduce you to Jennifer Clinehens. She is currently CX Strategy Director at Havas CX Helia, London. * [03:05] Jennifer shares her background and how she got involved in behavioral science. She has been lucky to work for many companies across many countries. * [04:35] A lot of the work she has been doing lately has been about the intersection between behavioral science and psychology. She takes those principles and applies them to experience design. * [06:48] One of the big things Jennifer does is framing touchpoints. * [09:39] Crossing over from one medium to another is a difficult point where we often lose some potential customers. There are a lot of steps that happen in the customer journey process. * [10:28] Generally, when you design a customer journey you use a customer journey map: a visual representation of what the customer journey is. * [10:45] On a map the customer journey is linear, but in real life it is messy. Yes, we have a beautiful picture of what the customer journey should be, but in the back of your mind, you have to be pragmatic. * [11:49] The closer we can get to design touchpoints and customer communications with a scientific approach or foundation to apply it to the real world the better it is. * [13:08] The number one thing brands seem to get wrong (or miss completely) is peak-end and applying it across the customer journey. The emotional journey is the secret sauce. * [14:17] A lot of brands get their ending wrong. They don’t know where the real ending is. * [15:41] Brands, in general, don’t realize that the last mile (the true ending) is so critical in so many ways. * [16:17] Jennifer shares an example of Disney realizing the customer journey didn’t end when you left their park. * [17:19] Making the very end of your experience even better and more exciting means your memory of the time you spent in Disneyland is even better. It is how you are constructing the memory, it is not about every single moment you had. It is that emotional peak and true ending that matter. * [17:57] “A brand is a memory.” Peter Steidl (from one of Melina’s “go-to” brainy books, Neurobranding, linked below) * [20:33] There are a few different ways you can look for that true end in your business. * [21:44] Part of the issue of finding that true ending also has to do with silos. * [23:56] The brands that measure on a journey-level versus a touchpoint level have much more value at the end of the day. * [25:32] Melina shares how an online mattress company handles its customer journey. * [27:16] It is important to think through all the moments in the experience: where there could be problems and frustrations and turning it into a really great shareable moment/story. Then you have different associations with that brand. * [28:30] Going that little bit extra and saying “Is that really the end of the customer experience?” is so important. * [29:14] Jennifer shares some of her favorite concepts. Peak-end is her favorite, but the most overlooked is visual salience. * [31:27] Melina shares her experience when she toured the Human Behavior Lab at Texas A&M. * [33:46] Jennifer encourages brands to have someone who is responsible for making sure effectiveness and emotion are being delivered on in the journey level. * [36:20] When you know what you are looking for then you can see if you are on track and put in those nudges. If you don’t know the end game, it is not as effective as it could be. The quality of the work is in the quality of the brief. * [38:06] Making choices easy is so much of what they do. Getting brands to understand where to get people ready to buy is the first step. * [39:15] The first thing they do is think: “Where are the points we need to be nudging to action?” and “Where are the points we need to be inspiring people?” They are usually not the same place. * [39:23] The book Choice Hacking is a good first start for people to think about a framework to apply this at the journey level. * [40:11] Melina’s closing reflections. * [41:46] Grab Melina’s brand new book, What Your Customer Wants (And Can’t Tell You), which is now on presale! Thanks for listening. Don’t forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show. Let’s connect: * Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com * The Brainy Business® on Facebook * The Brainy Business on Twitter * The Brainy Business on Instagram * The Brainy Business on LinkedIn * Melina on LinkedIn * The Brainy Business on Youtube More from The Brainy Business: * Master Your Mindset Mini-Course * BE Thoughtful Revolution - use code BRAINY to save 10% * Get Your FREE ebook * Melina’s John Mayer Pandora Station! Listen to what she listens to while working. Get the Books Mentioned on this Episode: * Choice Hacking * Free Chapter of Choice Hacking * Neurobranding Connect with Jennifer: * Jennifer on Twitter * More About Jennifer Past Episodes and Other Important Links: * Texas A&M Certificate Program * Inside the Texas A&M Human Behavior Lab * iMotions (The main software the Human Behavior Lab runs on.) * NUDGES & Choice Architecture * Framing * Priming * Interview with Will Leach * Peak-End Rule * Surprise and Delight * The Overwhelmed Brain and Its Impact on Decision Making * Interview with Roger Dooley * Time Discounting * Reciprocity Check out (and preorder!) my upcoming book, What Your Customer Wants (And Can’t Tell You) on Amazon, Bookshop, and Barnes & Noble If you are outside the US, please complete this form to be first to know when the book is available near you AND to help show there is a presence in your country to speed along international agreements and get it to you faster!
44 min
Behavioral Grooves Podcast
Behavioral Grooves Podcast
Kurt Nelson, PhD and Tim Houlihan
Why We Need Robots with Kind Faces with Bertram Malle
Bertram Malle, PhD teaches social cognitive science and social psychology at Brown University, he’s the author of dozens of articles and has focused his recent work on how humans feel about robots, and researches how the etiquette and facial abilities of robots impact how we perceive them. His research indicates that the more human-looking a robot is – especially in its “face” – the more humans are likely to attribute emotions or moral codes to them. Bertram’s work reminds us that the context we experience robots in influences the relationships we build. Maybe more importantly, Bertram reminded us that robots must be designed to exist in very specific contexts. The appearance and communication abilities of a robot that checks us into a doctor’s office needs to be very different from the robots we use to assist us with making an airline reservation. While that may be intuitive on one level, it highlights the remarkable complexity required in the design and manufacturing of these robots. Each one needs to be built for a specific purpose – there is no one-size-fits-all with robots. Bertram reminded us that it’s difficult to imagine that robots will ever reach the complexity and flexibility of their human counterparts. We also parsed out the differences between hope and optimism. This topic was particularly important to because we’re too often conflating the two. Hope, Bertram explained, is something we have when we lack confidence or influence in the outcome. And optimism exists where we might have some degree of influence over the outcome. We hope you enjoy our conversation with Bertram Malle. © 2021 Behavioral Grooves Links Bertram Malle, PhD email: bfmalle@brown.edu Social Cognitive Science Research Lab (Brown University): http://research.clps.brown.edu/SocCogSci/index.html Bertram Malle, “Theory of Mind”: https://nobaproject.com/modules/theory-of-mind Bertram Malle & Patty Bruininks “Distinguishing Hope from Optimism and Related Affective States”: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/226421327_Distinguishing_Hope_from_Optimism_and_Related_Affective_States Bertram Malle Selected Publications: http://research.clps.brown.edu/SocCogSci/Publications/publications.html ABOT: http://www.abotdatabase.info/ MIT Lab on Automated Vehicles: https://www.media.mit.edu/research/?filter=everything&tag=autonomous-vehicles “Her” film: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Her_(film) “Ex Machina” film: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ex_Machina_(film) TAY: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tay_(bot) Isaac Asimov: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Asimov Jóhann Jóhannsson: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%B3hann_J%C3%B3hannsson Hildur Guðnadóttir: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hildur_Gu%C3%B0nad%C3%B3ttir Fritz Heider, PhD & Marianne Simmel, PhD, “An experimental study of apparent behavior”: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1945-01435-001 Common Biases and Heuristics: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1XHpBr0VFcaT8wIUpr-9zMIb79dFMgOVFRxIZRybiftI/edit?usp=sharing Minnesota Timberwolves: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minnesota_Timberwolves Musical Links Radiohead “Hail to the Thief”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MdwaUtW_D4 Esbjörn Svensson Trio “Seven Days of Falling”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7KXq6RJ0PA Bill Dixon “Motorcycle ‘66”: https://youtu.be/ZcO8zfp-FLg Tyshawn Sorey “Unfiltered”: https://tyshawn-sorey.bandcamp.com/album/unfiltered Sigur Ros “Brennisteinn”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oc6zXSdYXm8 Hildur Gu∂nadottir “Unveiled”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzaxVFc9oIs Anders Hillborg “Violin Concerto No. 1”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jrJ7rhQDjsE Daniel Lanois with the Venetian Snares: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9u93SDxNsk Daniel Lanois with Parachute Club: https://www.discogs.com/The-Parachute-Club-Rise-Up/release/1209691 The Bad Plus “Never Stop II”: https://thebadplus.bandcamp.com/album/never-stop-ii Iceland Symphony Orchestra, “Recurrence”: https://nationalsawdust.org/thelog/2017/02/16/playlist-9/ David Chesky, “Jazz in the new harmonic”: https://chesky.com/products/jazz-in-the-new-harmonic-david-chesky-download Kings of Leon, “Sex on Fire”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RF0HhrwIwp0 “Annihilation” soundtrack: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9eidResq9g “Tenet” soundtrack: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVMkvCTT_yg
1 hr 27 min
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