Farm Land
Farm Land
Nov 27, 2020
What's Brewing - Producing Great Compost for Great Compost Tea (WB03)
Play • 46 min

Troy Hinke of Living Roots Compost Tea talks about compost production for great teas.  He also discusses which types of composts are a good fit for compost tea.

Follow Troy on IG: https://www.instagram.com/livingrootscomposttea/

 

This episode was produced by Diego Footer. 

Follow Diego on IG https://instagram.com/diegofooter

Podcasts by Diego Footer:

Microgreens: https://apple.co/2m1QXmW

Vegetable Farming: https://apple.co/2lCuv3m

Livestock Farming: https://apple.co/2m75EVG

Large Scale Farming: https://apple.co/2kxj39i

In Search of Soil: http://bit.ly/soilpodcast

 

Small Farm Tools https://www.paperpot.co/

The Abundant Edge
The Abundant Edge
Abundant Edge
The Abundant Edge is becoming Regenerative Skills. Thank you for all your support!
Welcome friends and family to the very last episode of the Abundant Edge podcast. I know I’ve built this up to feel a little final, but the truth is that this is just the beginning. I personally feel like I've hit the limit of what I can present and the value I can bring to the podcasting space through the hour long interview format, and while I’m so grateful for all of the life changing insights and even connections that I’ve gained by speaking to my heroes and teachers in the regenerative fields, I think it’s time for a change.  The other side of this is that there are so many both new and established shows that are rocking the interview format. I’ve especially loved and highly recommend Sustainable World Radio with Jill Cloutier, The Permaculture Podcast with Scott Mann, Green Dreamer with Kamea Chayne, and Regenerative Agriculture with John Kempf. While there are tons more great shows with regenerative messages out there, those have been the ones I’ve gone back to and gotten ideas and inspiration from time and again, not only for the quality conversations with great guests that they feature, but for the excellent sound and production quality, which really makes a difference when you listen to as many podcasts as I do. So by changing formats in the next season, I know the bases for longer form interviews about regenerative topics are still well covered.  On the other hand, I’ve been motivated lately to bring more storytelling and condensed actionable information to those of you who don’t have as much time to commit to 30 minutes or more of an interview and are looking for the cliff notes and tangible steps that you can take right now, today, to strive for a regenerative future.  I also keep hearing from those of you listening that you want to participate and get involved, and for that reason I’ll be creating resources beyond just the podcast so those of you who learn better with visual aids, to-do lists, and note packets can revisit the information in the show without having to go back and listen to the whole show again. But I’ll tell you more about those bonus materials in a bit Resources: https://sustainableworldradio.com/ https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/ http://regenerativeagriculturepodcast.com/ https://greendreamer.com/ https://soundcloud.com/hugrecords?ref=clipboard&p=a&c=1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnc95-EPUwk
21 min
The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson
The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson
Featuring special guests such as Jason Mraz, Kari Spencer, Lisa Steele, and
576: Casey Cox on the Story of our Farm
Being a young farmer with a long family history of farming. In This Podcast: There are many people that grow up on a farm that choose to leave to find their calling in the city. However, Casey Cox left her family farm to find her calling only to realize that her destiny was calling from her back yard all along. Listen in to learn about how she found her passion in conservation, her role as a farmer and land stewardship advocate, as well as the various life changing opportunities she has been involved in. Don’t miss an episode! visit UrbanFarm.Org/podcast Casey is the sixth generation of her family to farm on the Flint River in South Georgia. Her family farm, Longleaf Ridge, produces sweet corn, peanuts, field corn, soybeans, and timber. Prior to returning to the farm full-time, Casey managed the Flint River Soil and Water Conservation District, serving as Executive Director for over 5 years. In this role, she developed and directed multiple projects with Federal, state, and private partners and was responsible for procuring and managing over $13.5 million of funding for conservation programs. She was appointed by Secretary Sonny Perdue in 2019 to serve as Georgia’s Alternate Board Member on the National Peanut Board. Casey holds a Bachelor of Science in Natural Resource Conservation from the University of Florida. Her most significant professional contribution to date was teaching Cookie Monster and Gonger where peanut butter comes from on Season 49 of Sesame Street. Visit www.UrbanFarm.org/longleafridge for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library! Casey Cox on the Story of our Farm.
46 min
Living Free in Tennessee - Nicole Sauce
Living Free in Tennessee - Nicole Sauce
Nicole Sauce
Episode 388 - My Experiences With Rental Properties
Today by request of the chatter over in our MeWe group, I will share with you my perspective as a landlord of 20 years, tell you the story of how I got started and what brought me to this point, as talk about some best practices I have put in place to support by growing business. This is not investment, legal or real estate advice - rather I will share my personal journey. Save the date: Rogue Food conference, June 5 in Tennessee - more details as things develop at https://roguefoodconference.com/. The Greater Reset starts tonight at 6pm Central and sessions will stream here: https://thegreaterreset.org/. Today’s topic: The Agora. Tomorrow at 6: Take Control of Your Health and Education Tales from the Prepper Pantry * Crawling through the food and buying lots of fresh - will adjust grocery list for next month * Fresh salad update (video coming out this week) * Monthly grocery update: $260 excluding feed and including all non food replenishings * Duck Fat Roasted Cauliflower with Truffled Parmesan - a recipe Featured Forage: Update * tubers: sassafrass, jerusalem artichoke and dandelion Operation Independence * Event Chair Score * Focus on Taxes Main topic of the Show: My Experiences With Rental Properties How I became a landlord: * Childhood, father, and first job * Starter Home Purchase and Renting Rooms * Assisting a friend with managing and maintaining their 5 rental properties * Cross-country move * PDX Rental and lessons learned * Long distance management is tough * Drugs and other crimes * Property managers * Moving to the country - Nashville Experience * More troubles with late rent/damages * Being Nice * The full eviction process * Recouping damages * Background checks * Renting for property appreciation vs Cashflow vs vacation rentals * My current strategy: Cashflow * Best Practices * Background checks * Rent slowly, evict quickly * Digital payments (I use Cozi.co) * Bank Account Discipline * Tracking Miles Driven - what did and did not work for me) * Choosing paint and fixtures * Strictly by the book on contractual items * Showing kindness to your clients (AKA renters) * Outsourcing Maintenance (Look at the ROI) * Landlord Associations * Find Mentors Purposefully did not talk about rental laws, business structure and liability protections because this is very specific to your location, where your rentals are, and what your long term plans are with the properties. Make it a great week! GUYS! Don’t forget about the cookbook, Cook With What You Have by Nicole Sauce and Mama Sauce. Community * Mewe Group: https://mewe.com/join/lftn * Telegram Group: https://t.me/LFTNGroup * Odysee: https://odysee.com/$/invite/@livingfree:b Advisory Board * The Booze Whisperer * The Tactical Redneck * Chef Brett * Samantha the Savings Ninja Resources * Membership Sign Up * Holler Roast Coffee
1 hr 18 min
Soil Sense
Soil Sense
NDSU Extension
DIRT Workshop Roundup: Strip Tillage, Cover Crops, Relay Crops, and Grazing
This is our final episode of season three. What a great season it has been! To close out season three, we wanted to bring you a highlight reel from the recent DIRT workshop. However, with two full days of material and dozens of experts weighing in on a variety of topics - there was no way to condense things down to a 30 minute Soil Sense episode. So instead, I chose to pull clips from four different individuals, each of which weighed in on a different panel during the DIRT Workshop. Today’s guests were chosen not only for great information and stories, but also because they have not yet been featured on this podcast.You’ll hear from Steven Schuster, a farmer in Minto, North Dakota, talking about strip tillage, then will hear from Stefan Gailans, who is with the Practical Farmers of Iowa talking about cover crops, then Russ Gesch from USDA ARS based out of Morris, MN who shared about relay cropping, and will finish today’s episode with rancher Jerry Doan from McKenzie, ND who describes some of this practices grazing cover crops. “It’s not necessarily about getting the highest yield. It’s about having the most profit from the yield that you are getting, and controlling risk.” - Steven Schuster “A living cover crop is still standing up. Those row units can move through that a little better, so that they don’t plug. They can cut through the cover crop in the soil, get good depth control, and cover up that furrow again.” - Stefan Gailans (on planting soybeans green) “We call these winter oilseed ‘cash cover crops’, because we’re wanting to harvest them to tap into new markets, but also getting those environmental benefits of using it as a cover crop.” - Russ Gesch, Ph.D. (on relay cropping camelina/soybean) “When I was growing up, it was wheat and summer fallow, and half of that soil is in South Dakota because that’s where it blew to back in those days. And I didn’t know if we could bring those soils back...and we’ve been really impressed by how we ARE bringing those back.” - Jerry Doan This Week on Soil Sense: * Steven Schuster, farmer from Minto, ND talks about strip tillage * Stefan Gailans, research and field crops director for the Practical Farmers of Iowa talks about cover crops * Russ Gesch, Ph.D., research plant physiologist with USDA ARS in Morris, MN on relay cropping camelina * Jerry Doan, rancher from McKenzie, ND on grazing cover crops Connect with Soil Sense: * _Soil Sense Initiative _ Soil Sense Podcast is hosted by _Tim Hammerich_ of the _Future of Agriculture Podcast_.
28 min
Beekeeping Today Podcast
Beekeeping Today Podcast
Jeff Ott, Kim Flottum
Kaylee Richardson - The Honeystead with Kirsten (S3, E35)
On today’s show, we chat with Kaylee Richardson, who runs the Farm on Quail Hollow and posts about her life as a modern-day homesteader @the_honeystead. She shares the nitty-gritty details of what it takes to produce most of your food from your own farm both in beautiful photos and via informative YouTube videos. She’s grown her apiary substantially, building up from a couple of hives into a small, sideline business. Currently she’s in the process of relocating her colonies from her garden to a separate spot, where their flightpath won’t be obstructed by foot traffic. We had a chance to talk about what it takes to live the life she has embraced with her family, the ups and downs, the joys and the hardships. She’s learning about herbalism, so she can incorporate more of the plants she grows and forages for on their farm in Virginia into her diet and the skincare products she produces. Join us, as we learn more about The Honeystead. Additional information: * The Honeystead Website: http://www.thehoneystead.com * Follow Kaylee's The Honeystead on YouTube: https://youtube.com/c/TheFarmOnQuailHollow * Follow Kaylee on Instagram: https://www.instagram/the_honeystead.com * Kim & Jim's Honey Bee Obscura Podcast: https://www.honeybeeobscura.com _______________________ Kirsten's interviews are brought to you by BetterBee. BetterBee’s mission is to support every beekeeper with excellent customer service, continued education and quality equipment. How do they do this? Because many of their employees are also beekeepers, so they know the needs, challenges and answers to your beekeeping questions. From their colorful and informative catalog to their support of beekeeper educational activities, including this podcast series, BetterBee truly is Beekeepers Serving Beekeepers. See for yourself at www.betterbee.com Thanks to Strong Microbials for their support of Beekeeping Today Podcast. Find out more about heir line of probiotics in our Season 3, Episode 12 episode and from their website: https://www.strongmicrobials.com Thank you to Global Patties for their support of Beekeeping Today Podcast! Global Patties is a family business that manufactures protein supplement patties for honey bees. Feeding your hives protein supplement patties will help ensure that they produce strong and health colonies by increasing brood production and overall honey flow. Global offers a variety of standard patties, as well as custom patties to meet your specific needs. Visit them today at http://globalpatties.com and let them know you appreciate them sponsoring this episode! We want to also thank 2 Million Blossoms as a sponsor of the podcast. 2 Million Blossoms is a new quarterly magazine destined for your coffee table. Each page of the magazine is dedicated to the stories and photos of all pollinators and written by leading researchers, photographers and our very own, Kim Flottum. _______________ We hope you enjoy this podcast and welcome your questions and comments: questions@beekeepingtodaypodcast.com Thanks to Bee Culture, the Magazine of American Beekeeping, for their support of The Beekeeping Today Podcast. Available in print and digital at www.beeculture.com Thank you for listening! Podcast music: Young Presidents, "Be Strong", Musicalman, "Epilogue" Beekeeping Today Podcast is an audio production of Growing Planet Media, LLC
50 min
Tiny House Lifestyle Podcast
Tiny House Lifestyle Podcast
Ethan Waldman
Rocket Mass Heaters For Tiny Houses: What, How and Why?
Rocket Mass Heaters are a very popular DIY in the cob, natural building, and permaculture world, but is only starting to get traction in the tiny house movement. Today, Chris McClellan AKA Uncle Mud is here to explain how Rocket Mass Heaters Work, how to build one of your own, and most importantly, his design for a tiny rocket heater, called the Cottage Rocket. Full Show Notes and Images: https://www.thetinyhouse.net/uncle-mud *In This Episode * * "The first non-suicidal woodstove" is safer and more efficient * Tips for those who want to DIY their own rocket mass heater * Don't skimp on these materials, especially in a tiny house * How the EPA tests woodstoves explains why rocket heaters aren't quite legal * Enough heat for 8 hours without being overheated: the Cottage Rocket does it * Makeup air and minimizing the chance of smoke in your house * Saving money, using scraps, and lowering the environmental footprint * Where to find cheaper materials to insulate your tiny house * Sponsor: *Take 20% off Tiny House Decisions using the coupon code tiny * *Tiny House Decisions is the guide that I wish I had when I was building my tiny house. And it comes in three different packages to help you on your unique tiny house journey. If you're struggling to figure out the systems for your tiny house, how you're going to heat it, how you're going to plumb it, what you're going to build it out, then tiny house decisions will take you through the process systematically and help you come up with a design that works for you. Right now I'm offering 20% off any package of Tiny House Decisions for podcast listeners. Head over to https://www.thetinyhouse.net/thd and use the coupon code tiny at checkout!
54 min
Farm4Profit Podcast
Farm4Profit Podcast
Tanner Winterhof, David Whitaker, Corey Hillebo
Will the US and China Play Nice Together?
US and Global (China) Economies, Inside and Outside of Agriculture Dr. Wendong Zhang is an assistant professor in the Department of Economics at Iowa State University since August 2015. His research seeks to better understand U.S. farmland market, agricultural water conservation, and Chinese agriculture. Dr. Zhang is also affiliated with Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD), where he co-founded the new ISU China Ag center jointly with Dr. Dermot Hayes in collaboration with Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in 2017. Dr. Zhang is the leading researcher of the Iowa Land Value Survey, the Iowa Farmland Ownership and Tenure Survey, as well as the Iowa Lakes Survey. He also serves as the Academic Vice President for ASFMRA Iowa Chapter and leads the annual ISU Soil Management and Land Valuation (SMLV) Conference. Dr. Zhang received his Ph.D. in Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics from the Ohio State University in July 2015, and he also hold a BSc in Environmental Science from Fudan University in China. Let’s jump right into it! * United States net farm income – how has it compared year over year? * Is this gain larger or lesser than average? * How are the US export markets compared to last year and historically * Grain Exports * Meat Exports * Other Exports * What does the US – China Trade relationship look like now? * Did President Trump hurt or help? * Did China honor their obligations? * Were the tariff’s “Effective” * What are your predictions for the next term (2021-2022)? * What does trade policy look like under the next administration? * Will it be a priority? * Will tariff’s stay? * Will we given in to pressure from others? * In your opinion is China an indispensable trading partner for the US? * For AG products? * What products in general? * Is there something the current administration should do in a trade agreement to make this work better in the future? * Will it ever be more balanced? * How is China’s economy? * Do we really know? * Continued individual wealth – more protein consumption? * Growing Middle Class? * What does it look like in the near future? * Agriculture * Livestock – Swine * Stock piles – dwindling or growing? * Transportation * High Speed Rail * What are China’s trade targets or focuses now? * Are they looking for formal alliances? * Are they targeting new partners? * Which of the two economic power houses are currently sitting in a better position? China or US * Why? All industries? * Where is the advantage * Agriculture * Manufacturing * Technology * What is your prediction on where is the US AG Economy headed? * How does this compare to where have we come from? * Anything else you’d like our audience to know? * What, in your opinion, are the most common traits amongst the most successful farmers you have observed? * Summary * Challenge * Closing * Remind the listener to leave a comment if this episode brought them value. Ask them you like, leave a review where they listen, and share with their friends. They can always send topic ideas to farm4profitllc@gmail.com
1 hr 9 min
The Thriving Farmer Podcast
The Thriving Farmer Podcast
Michael Kilpatrick
109. Howard Prussack on Four Decades of Profitable Farming
What’s the oldest thriving organic farm in Vermont and how have they grown throughout the years? Find out today from Howard Prussack of High Meadows Farm, located just a short drive from the center of Putney, Vermont. High Meadows Farm is a 65 Acre farm of rolling hills and fertile soils, surrounded by oak and maple woodlands. As Vermont’s oldest certified organic farm, High Meadows has been providing the community and greater New England with premium organic vegetables and potted plants since 1979. The land has been used for farming as far back as the 1700s when it was once part of the historic Ranney family farm, the first settlers in town. A farm (and a farmer!) with so much history must be rich in knowledge, so be sure to check this one out! You’ll hear: How Howard began his farming journey and what’s happened since 0:45 What kind of tunnels Howard uses on the farm 20:54 How the growing season progresses on High Meadows Farm 23:56 Whether Howard prefers larger or smaller greenhouses 25:25 What kinds of field crops High Meadows Farm grows 37:02 How Howard’s team is assembled 44:12 The story behind their farmer’s market 54:38 When, Howard believes, is the best time to start a farm 1.01:34 The biggest mistake Howard sees newer farmers making 1.02:11 Where you can find out more about Howard and High Meadows Farm 1.10:10 About the Guest: High Meadows Farm is a 65 Acre farm of rolling hills and fertile soils, surrounded by oak and maple woodlands. Situated just a short drive from the center of Putney, VT, Vermont’s oldest certified organic Farm. High Meadows has been providing the community and greater New England with premium organic vegetables and potted plant plants since 1979. High altitude, cool evenings, and mineral rich soils are key to High Meadows’ sweet nutrient rich vegetables. This land has been used for farming as far back as the 1700s when it was once part of the historic Ranney family farm, the first settlers in this town. Prior to its purchase in 1979, the farm was primarily run as a dairy farm. Four and a half miles from the center of Putney, VT, High Meadows farm is located just adjacent to the site where NOFA VT was founded. NOFA’s 40th year celebration was held in the High Meadows Farm barn! Howard is responsible for the sales end of the business, including sourcing new accounts, arranging promotions, and selling in new items. He does all of the seeding, manages the facility, including greenhouse and field production, fertilizing, pest control, repairs and maintenance, greenhouse construction, and trucks. Howard runs the retail business at the farmer’s market as well. Lisa manages the plant inventories, plans the production schedule, is in charge of rooted cuttings and plant material purchases, and instituted lot control. Lisa keeps the business financial records, forecasts, sales, and expenses, and works on strategy with Howard. In addition, Lisa readies plant pots for sale and fills orders and loads trucks. Resources: Local Line - https://site.localline.ca/, https://site.localline.ca/learn/free-tools Website - http://highmeadowsfarm.com/wordpress2/farm/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/vermontorganic/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/highmeadowsfarm/
1 hr 19 min
Making Permaculture Stronger
Making Permaculture Stronger
Making Permaculture Stronger
The Seven First Principles of Regeneration with Carol Sanford (E55)
In this episode pioneering regenerative thinker Carol Sanford rejoins me to share a living systems framework she calls The Seven First Principles of Regeneration. Sketch by Dan based on Carol's description Resources to Deepen Learning My first chat with Carol (also see these follow up words from Carol)My second chat with Carol where she shares her four levels of paradigmCarol's websiteThe Deep Pacific Change Agent Community (That Dan is part of)A series of articles in which Carol applies the Seven First Principles to educationCarol going through the principles in a different way on her Business Second Opinion PodcastCarol's book The Regenerative Life in which she goes through the seven first principlesWholeness and the Implicate Order by David Bohm Carol Sanford. A few transcribed lines from the episode Thanks to MPS patron Jon Buttery for pulling some comments that stood out for him from the chat (with approx times): 13:36 – "I don’t want you to be disappointed that after a year you haven’t got them [the seven first principles], that’s a good sign" 18:57 - "You can’t go do – in the sense that you’ll change something – you have to go think a different way and you have to start in a different place" 22:43 - "The word ‘systems thinking’ is thrown around for a lot of things that are machine based"  23:23 – "There are no feedback loops …. we impose those kinds of ideas" 24:05 – "A fragmented view …  we assume … if we get good enough … somehow we’ll see how they all relate"  26:53 – "What is the work this place does in this planet?  … what is its story?" 30:23 – "Watch yourself making lists" 32:26 – "Fragmentation is the basis of every problem on the earth" 38:40 – "It took me literally a couple of decades to learn to see essence. … it’s a different way of seeing the world"
1 hr 4 min
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