The Pastore Podcast
On Gene Variances
Sep 6, 2019 · 1 hr 5 min
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Dr. Pastore and Lexie cover how certain variations of specific genes can affect your performance, your nutrition, your cravings and even how food tastes.

 

In-depth topics include how genetics affect:

  • High carbohydrate consumption and low HDL cholesterol levels
  • How food tastes, and why some people can never get enough sugar
  • How your risk for tendon/ligament/joint injury is increased/decreased
  • Over-eating and difficulty losing weight

 

 

 

Genetic SNPs covered in the episode:

 

KCTD10-GG

MMAB-GG

MVK

May cause low HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels with high carbohydrate consumption (~231g+ per day)

 

SLC2A2 rs5400 - T allele (even just one)

“Sweet tooth” gene, linked to over-eating, not feeling satisfied after sugar consumption, less sensitive to feeling the affects of high glucose levels in blood

 

TAS1R3-AA

TAS1R3-GA

Sugar tastes less sweet, increases the likelihood over overconsumption of sugar and artificial sweeteners

 

TAS2R38-C allele

TAS2R38-G allele

Do not like the taste of bitter foods (coffee, broccoli, kale, Brussels sprouts), over-salt or sweeten foods to cover up the taste

 

TAS2R38-TT

Find bitter foods less bitter than other people (enjoy broccoli, cabbage, kale, etc)

 

COL5A1-TT

Decreased elasticity and range of motion in joints. Increased risk of injuring joints, connective tissue (tendons/ligaments) and soft tissue.

 

COL5A1-CC

Protective genotype, reduced rate of tendon injury

 

COL1A1-TT

Decreased risk of injuring joints, connective tissue (tendons/ligaments) and soft tissue.

 

GDF5-T allele

Increased risk for joint injuries, can be a warning sign of early (mid-40’s) onset osteoarthritis

 

MC4R-C allele

KCDT15-C allele

Increases likelihood of higher BMI (from fat mass), slows the process of weight loss, can cause more cravings for higher caloric/processed food intake

 

COMT-GG

Increases the likelihood to overeat

 

SHTB2, LEP, PCSK1-2, and FTO are currently being researched for their connection to obesity.

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