The Disappearing Forests: Is ecocide a crime?
31 min

Time is running out for the world’s forests, ecosystems and the life they support. The consequences for human life and climate could be catastrophic – unless we take action now.

In this episode James Wong speaks to scientists from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew to understand how forest loss and timber trafficking presents massive problems for future generations – and how they are tackling the illegal trade of wood

He’ll also hear their different opinions on whether or not ecocide – or the deliberate damaging of environments – should be outlawed internationally.

Subscribe to Unearthed: Mysteries from an unseen world on your podcast app to get a new episode each fortnight.

And you can share the show or join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #KewUnearthed.

Follow @kewgardens for more insights into the magical, mysterious world of plants and fungi.

www.kew.org

With thanks to Hague Talks for use of this audio clip.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgQ9kVzy1TM

https://www.haguetalks.com

Find out how World Forest ID is using georeferenced wood samples to verify timber origin and species.

https://worldforestid.org

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library
The Victorian Cult Of Shakespeare
For most of the 1700s, Shakespeare was considered a very good playwright. But in the 1800s, and especially during the Victorian period, Shakespeare became a prophet. Ministers began drawing their lessons from his texts. Scholars wrote books about the scriptural resonances of his words—often while taking those words out of context. Shakespeare’s works, the Victorians believed, offered religious revelations. In his new book, "The Victorian Cult of Shakespeare: Bardology in the Nineteenth Century," University of Washington Associate Professor of English Charles LaPorte examines this moment in literary and religious history. We invited him to join us on the podcast to tell us how people in the 19th century thought about Shakespeare, how the moment helped give rise to the “authorship controversy,” and how sometimes, even today, we read Shakespeare like the Victorians. LaPorte is interviewed by Barbara Bogaev. "The Victorian Cult of Shakespeare: Bardology in the Nineteenth Century" was published by Cambridge University Press in 2020. Dr. Charles LaPorte's previous book, "Victorian Poets and the Changing Bible," was named Best First Book in Victorian Studies by the Northeast Victorian Studies Association in 2011. From the Shakespeare Unlimited podcast. Published November 24, 2020. © Folger Shakespeare Library. All rights reserved. This podcast episode, “I Am No Thing To Thank God On,” was produced by Richard Paul. Garland Scott is the associate producer. It was edited by Gail Kern Paster. Ben Lauer is the web producer, with help from Leonor Fernandez. We had technical help from Andrew Feliciano and Paul Luke at Voice Trax West in Studio City, California.
37 min
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed: The Real Reader's Quarterly
25: A Writer’s Territory
The Scottish nature writer Jim Crumley takes the Slightly Foxed team on a tour of literary landscapes, from the lochs of the Trossachs and the mountainous Cairngorms to Aldo Leopold’s sand county in Wisconsin and Barry Lopez’s Arctic. Together they trace the chain of writers who have influenced Jim, from Robert Burns and Wordsworth to Thoreau and Walt Whitman, and see nature through the eyes of his hero, the great Scottish naturalist and photographer Seton Gordon. They discuss how folklore has demonized the wolf while Jim believes its reintroduction could hugely benefit the ecology of the Scottish landscape. And finally they venture off the beaten track with this month’s wide-ranging reading recommendations. Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 40 minutes; 24 seconds) Books Mentioned We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch (mailto:jess@foxedquarterly.com) with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.  An Englishman’s Commonplace Book (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/an-englishmans-commonplace-book/) , Roger Hudson (1:14) A Boy at the Hogarth Press & A Parcel of Time (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/hogarth-press-richard-kennedy-plain-foxed/) , Richard Kennedy (6:40)  Jim Crumley’s Seasonal Quartet: The Nature of Autumn (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/jim-crumley-the-nature-of-autumn/) , The Nature of Winter (https://saraband.net/sb-title/the-nature-of-winter/) , The Nature of Spring (https://foxedquarterly.com/jim-crumley-the-nature-of-spring/) , The Nature of Summer (https://foxedquarterly.com/jim-crumley-the-nature-of-summer/) (11:03) The Cairngorm Hills of Scotland, The Charm of Skye and Amid Snowy Wastes, Seton Gordon are out print, but some Seton Gordon titles are available from Trieste Publishing (https://triestepublishing.com/) (14:11) A High and Lonely Place (https://foxedquarterly.com/jim-crumley-a-high-and-lonely-place/) , Jim Crumley (15:49) A Sand County Almanac (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/aldo-leopold-sand-county-almanac/) , Aldo Leopold (18:14) Arctic Dreams (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/barry-lopez-arctic-dreams/) , Barry Lopez (18:43) The Last Wolf (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/him-crumley-the-last-wolf/) , Jim Crumley (22:54) Highland River, Neil Gunn is currently out of stock at the publisher (31:07) Featherhood (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/charlie-gilmour-featherhood/) , Charlie Gilmour (33:28) The Silver Dark Sea (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/susan-fletcher-the-silver-dark-sea/) , Susan Fletcher (35:13) A Month in Siena (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/hisham-matar-a-month-in-siena/) , Hisham Matar (36:12) The Hunting Party (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/lucy-foley-hunting-party/) , Lucy Foley (38:00) Related Slightly Foxed Articles Word from the Wood (https://foxedquarterly.com/aldo-leopold-sand-country-almanac-literary-review/) , Galen O’Hanlon on A Sand County Almanac, Aldo Leopold, Issue 54 (18:14) Northern Lights (https://foxedquarterly.com/penelope-lively-barry-lopez-arctic-dreams-literary-review/) , Penelope Lively on Arctic Dreams, Barry Lopez, Issue 4 (18:43) Other Links An Englishmans’ Commonplace Book ‘launch party’ at John Sandoe Books (https://foxedquarterly.com/book-launch-roger-hudson-an-englishmans-commonplace-book-john-sandoe-books/) (1:19)  The Art Workers’ Guild (https://www.artworkersguild.org/) (1:54)  Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park (https://www.lochlomond-trossachs.org/) (8:37)  Saraband, independent publisher (https://saraband.net/) (12:20)  Jim Crumley, The Scots Magazine (https://www.scotsmagazine.com/articles/category/explore/wildlife/) (31:56) Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable (https://www.podcastable.co.uk/)
40 min
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