The Neoliberal Podcast's Best Books of 2020, Part 2
Play • 50 min

Jeremiah shares the best books he read in 2020, part two of a two-part episode.  Part two contains the show's top six 2020 book recommendations, for books that address some of society's biggest questions: Why are we polarized? Wow do people respond to pandemics? Why do good people have bad political beliefs? How can we defend liberalism from authoritarianism? How did societies become rich?  Also included are more reviews of science fiction, fantasy, and alternative-format story telling. Make sure to check out part one as well to hear it all - you can find part one here - https://open.spotify.com/episode/65sOjFVxpr305uqfqUwJyX

To listen to the 'First half of 2020' Best Books episode from May 2020, click here - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-neoliberal-podcast-best-books-of-2020-part-1/id1390384827?i=1000475836676

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Model Citizen
Model Citizen
Will Wilkinson
Richard Florida on the Post-Pandemic City
This episode marks the beginning of a new chapter for Model Citizen. With the power of a single mighty tweet, I've broken off the shackles of formal institutional affiliation. So we're on our own. Let's just say it's been a hell of a week. In that time, I've launched a daily newsletter, also called Model Citizen, which I've integrated with this podcast. If you'd like to support me, and the burgeoning Model Citizen media empire, please consider subscribing at modelcitizen.substack.com. It's just $5.99 a month. In addition to thought-provoking writing delivered straight to your inbox, subscribers get audio versions of articles, special episodes of the Model Citizen podcast and more. But on with the show! This week's guest, Richard Florida, is one of our leading authorities on cities and urban life. Richard is author of a shelf of books, including the _Rise of the Creative Class_ and, most recently, the _New Urban Crisis_. In this episode, we talk about the extent to which work-from-home arrangements will or won't stick after the pandemic, whether San Francisco faces the fate of urban powerhouses of yesteryear, like Pittsburgh and Detroit, how self-reinforcing selection effects have made academia stifling, and more. Richard Florida is University Professor at the University of Toronto's School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, as well as a Distinguished Fellow at NYU's Schack School of Real Estate. And, as you'll see, he's also a hell of a nice guy. Readings The Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida Who’s Your City by Richard Florida Jason Rentfrow’s Google Scholar page Triumph of the City by Ed Glaeser Jonathan Miller on Real Estate after the Pandemic, Bloomberg Masters in Business podcast Prison Notebooks by Antonio Gramsci Subscribe to the Model Citizen newsletter http://modelcitizen.substack.com/subscribe Credits Host: Will Wilkinson (@willwilkinson) Music: Dig Deep by RW Smith
49 min
The Bottom Up Revolution
The Bottom Up Revolution
Strong Towns
Kelly Rae Kirkpatrick: A Strong Towns Advocate on her City Council
Today’s guest is Kelly Rae Kirkpatrick— a Strong Towns reader and advocate based in Rochester, MN who owns her own local business, has been very active in food access issues and was recently elected to the Rochester City Council. She had actually been sworn in just a couple days before we recorded (which is why this conversation was pretty short—she's quite busy!). In this conversation, Kelly discusses what got her fired up about food and farming, and how she decided to run for office—plus what that was all like during the pandemic year of 2020. And she talks about how the Strong Towns approach inspires her work. We’ve been honored to feature a couple local elected officials on this show now and it’s always great to hear about how they made that journey from advocate to leader. Just last week, we were also hearing from a farmer and we’ve had on other guests who are involved in food growing and selling. These are such important building blocks for a strong town—access to local food, and dedicated, thoughtful local leaders. Additional Show Notes * Transition Rochester Facebook page * An article about the ‘Plant a Seed’ initiative * Enter the Strongest Town contest today! * 2021 Local-Motive Tour * Send us your own voicemail about the small (or big) thing you’re doing to make your town stronger. Just record a voice memo on your phone and email it to rachel@strongtowns.org. * Support this show and our many other resources for helping your town grow stronger by becoming a member today.
17 min
Upzoned
Upzoned
Strong Towns
When (If Ever) Should States Preempt Cities?
Strong Towns president Chuck Marohn has said that one change every city should make is to allow the next increment of development intensity by-right—i.e., single-family zoning would now permit duplexes, and so on. But if every city should make that change, does that mean states should come in and make that decision for cities—as Oregon recently did for cities with House Bill 2001? Not necessarily. This week’s episode of the Upzoned podcast is inspired by a recent article in Governing magazine called “States Preempt Cities Almost to the Point of Irrelevance.” In that piece, senior staff writer Alan Greenblatt describes how, over the past decade and across many issues, state governments have preempted local decision-making. For example, Texas, Arizona, Indiana and Louisiana are considering legislation that would prevent cities from reducing police or public safety budgets. Texas governor Greg Abbot went as far as to tweet: “We will defund cities that tried to defund police”. Yet as Greenblatt says, “If states are going to stop cities and counties from adopting their own spending priorities—no matter how misguided they may be—that raises the question of whether localities will be masters of their own fates or merely subservient branch offices of the state.” In this episode, Upzoned host Abby Kinney, an urban planner in Kansas City, and cohost Chuck Marohn talk about the trend of states preempting cities: When (if ever) should states step in to preempt local governments...and when does it become micromanaging? Using examples from California and Missouri, among other states, Chuck and Abby discuss where decisions should be made, the principle of subsidiarity, the consequences of “removing dynamism from the system,” and the rude awakening may experience when a tool (state preemption) used to push through a policy they like is later used to force a policy change they don’t. They also talk about those times when state preemption might make sense—and how they can be kept under control. Then in the Downzone, Chuck talks about a book he at least gave a shot. And Abby describes a recent homeowner’s scare involving frozen water pipes, a subsequent water leak, and an electrical box. Additional Show Notes * “States Preempt Cities Almost to the Point of Irrelevance,” by Alan Greenblatt * Abby Kinney (Twitter) * Charles Marohn (Twitter) * Gould Evans Studio for City Design * Theme Music by Kemet the Phantom (Soundcloud) * Strong Towns content related to this episode: * “When should the state jump in to address local problems?” by Spencer Gardner * “Accessory Dwelling Units Rock. But Should States Be Overriding Cities' Laws About Building Them?” (Podcast) * “Do Property Tax Caps Help or Hurt Communities?" * “Mapping the Effects of California's Prop 13,” by Connor Nielsen * “The Local Case for Reparations,” by Charles Marohn
35 min
The MMT Podcast with Patricia Pino & Christian Reilly
The MMT Podcast with Patricia Pino & Christian Reilly
Patricia Pino & Christian Reilly
#89 Warren Mosler & Phil Armstrong: Weimar Republic Hyperinflation Through An MMT Lens (part 2)
Part 2: Patricia and Christian talk to MMT founder Warren Mosler and MMT scholar Dr Phil Armstrong about their recent paper: “Weimar Republic Hyperinflation through a Modern Monetary Theory Lens”.   Part 1 of this conversation: https://www.patreon.com/posts/episode-88-phil-47638591   Please help sustain this podcast! Patrons get early access to all episodes and patron-only episodes: https://www.patreon.com/MMTpodcast   For an intro to MMT: Listen to our first three episodes: https://www.patreon.com/posts/41742417   All our episodes in chronological order: https://www.patreon.com/posts/43111643   All of our episodes with Warren Mosler: https://www.patreon.com/posts/42918786   All of our episodes with Phil Armstrong: https://www.patreon.com/posts/42072846   Some of our other episodes with Warren Mosler which deal with inflation, interest rates and central bank policy: Episode 59: What Do Central Banks Do?: https://www.patreon.com/posts/39070023 Episode 80: MMT Holiday Special (part 1): https://www.patreon.com/posts/45281376 Episode 81: MMT Holiday Special (part 2): https://www.patreon.com/posts/episode-81-mmt-2-45555840   Our episode 65 with Phil Armstrong on inflation (more on Paul Volcker as Fed chair in the intro): https://www.patreon.com/posts/40672678   Our episode 47 with Pavlina Tcherneva explaining the Job Guarantee: https://www.patreon.com/posts/36034543   Our episode 55 with Dr Dirk Ehnts on MMT in the context of the Eurozone: https://www.patreon.com/posts/38252014   Our episodes with Sam Levey that touch on the forward pricing channel: Episode 43: https://www.patreon.com/posts/35073683 Episode 76: https://www.patreon.com/posts/43697752 Episode 77: https://www.patreon.com/posts/43886189   Weimar Republic Hyperinflation through a Modern Monetary Theory Lens by Phil Armstrong and Warren Mosler: http://moslereconomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Weimar-Republic-Hyperinflation-through-a-Modern-Monetary-Theory-Lens.pdf   Warren Mosler - MMT white paper: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1gvDcMU_ko1h5TeVjQL8UMJW9gmKY1x0zcqKIRTZQDAQ/edit   Michael Hudson - Government Debt and Deficits Are Not the Problem. Private Debt Is: https://michael-hudson.com/2013/03/government-debt-and-deficits-are-not-the-problem-private-debt-is/   Clint Ballinger - Airplane crashes aren’t “hyperlandings”: https://clintballinger.wordpress.com/2020/04/30/airplane-crashes-arent-hyperlandings-notes-on-zimbabwe/   A Discussion of Central Bank Operations and Interest Rate Policy by Warren Mosler and Phil Armstrong: https://gimms.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Central-Bank-Interest-Rate-Policy-Mosler-Armstrong.pdf   Monopoly Money: The State as a Price Setter by Pavlina R. Tcherneva: http://moslereconomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Tcherneva_MonopolyMoney_2002.pdf   Bill Mitchell - Zimbabwe for hyperventilators 101: http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=3773   Tickets for “An Introduction To Modern Monetary Theory: Reconceptualising The Nature Of Banking” (presentation by Phil Armstrong) on 26th March 2021, organised by Women in Banking and Finance: https://www.wibf.org.uk/events/details/modern-monetary-theory   A list of other upcoming MMT events and courses: https://www.patreon.com/posts/47531455   A list of MMT-informed campaigns and organisations worldwide: https://www.patreon.com/posts/47900757   Phil Armstrong’s book, Can Heterodox Economics Make a Difference?: https://www.e-elgar.com/shop/gbp/can-heterodox-economics-make-a-difference-9781800370883.html   Warren Mosler’s (free) e-book, Seven Deadly Innocent Frauds Of Economic Policy: http://moslereconomics.com/wp-content/powerpoints/7DIF.pdf   Transcript for opening monologue: https://www.patreon.com/posts/47905062   We are working towards full transcripts, but in the meantime, closed captions for all episodes are available on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEp_nGVTuMfBun2wiG-c0Ew/videos   Show notes: https://www.patreon.com/posts/47904999
1 hr 4 min
The Strong Towns Podcast
The Strong Towns Podcast
Strong Towns
Rep. Jake Auchincloss & Rep. Mike Gallagher: How Congress Can Support Local Leaders and Get the Economy Going (Video)
Strong Towns advocates believe the way to grow stronger and more financially resilient towns and cities—and, by extension, a stronger, more resilient country—is from the bottom up. A bottom-up approach is one that meets the actual needs of residents. It taps into the energy and creativity that already exists in our communities. It is sensitive and responsive to feedback. (“This is working. That isn’t. Let’s hit the gas here, and pump the brakes there.”) It relies on small, incremental investments (little bets) instead of large, transformative projects. And it is obsessed with running the numbers, as Strong Towns founder and president Chuck Marohn wrote when describing the Strong Towns approach: “If we’re not doing the math, if we’re not asking the hard financial questions with each step we take, we’re doing a disservice to our fellow residents and the future generations who will inherit our choices.” While much of this bottom-up work is happening at the local level, there is an important role for the federal government. This week we’re excited to welcome to the Strong Towns podcast two U.S. representatives to talk about just that. Both are longtime Strong Towns readers, and they are thinking deeply about how Congress can strengthen towns and cities and get the economy moving again. Rep. Jake Auchincloss is a Democrat representing Massachusetts’s 4th congressional district. After graduating from Harvard College, Auchincloss joined the Marines. He commanded infantry in Afghanistan and special operations in Panama, and he's now a major in the reserves. After returning home, he served on the City Council in Newton, Massachusetts. Auchincloss was elected to Congress in 2020 and serves on The House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure. Rep. Mike Gallagher is a Republican representing Wisconsin’s 8th congressional district. Gallagher is a Marine veteran, serving for seven years on active duty and earning the rank of Captain. After earning his bachelor’s degree from Princeton University, Gallagher went on to earn a master’s degree in Security Studies from Georgetown University, a second in Strategic Intelligence from National Intelligence University, and his PhD in International Relations from Georgetown. Prior to getting elected to Congress in 2016, he worked in the private sector at a global energy and supply chain management company in Green Bay. Rep. Gallagher serves on the House Armed Services Committee and, with Rep. Auchincloss, on the Transportation & Infrastructure Committee. In this episode of the podcast—which we’re also releasing below on video and in transcript—Chuck Marohn talks with the congressmen about the challenges facing communities in their home districts and around the country. They discuss the push in Washington for a big infrastructure bill, whether a tension exists between infrastructure spending as economic stimulus and infrastructure spending as smart long-term investment, and the growing consensus to address the nation’s mountain of backlogged maintenance projects. They also talk about how the federal government can support smaller projects that may be less sexy but actually have a high ROI, why mayors and city councils must be empowered to make the decisions right for their communities, and much, much more. Additional Show Notes * Rep. Jake Auchincloss (Website) * Rep. Jake Auchincloss (Twitter) * Rep. Mike Gallagher (Website) * Rep. Mike Gallagher (Twitter) * Charles Marohn (Twitter) * The House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure * Recent Strong Towns content related to this episode: * “The Strong Towns Approach to Public Investment,” by Charles Marohn * “The Act Like You INVEST In America Act,” by Charles Marohn * “What Can We Hope For from a Mayor Pete D.O.T.?” (Podcast) * “The Great GASB!” by Joe Minicozzi * “A Better Use of Federal Infrastructure Spending” (Podcast) * “The Worst Possible Thing We Can Do With This Money” (Podcast) * “If We’re Not Going to Maintain What We Have, Then Why Bother Building Anything New?” by Charles Marohn * “You Were Mentioned on the Floor of Congress,” by John Pattison * “#NoNewRoads Gains Traction in D.C.”
53 min
Blocked and Reported
Blocked and Reported
Katie Herzog and Jesse Singal
Reply All And Mike Pesca And Smith College And Race And Race And Race
The liberal landscape is littered with race-related meltdowns. After a correction and an update to last week's Reply All episode, Katie and Jesse discuss Mike Pesca's suspension from Slate and a long, infuriating article in the New York Times about false accusations at Smith College. Reply All’s “The Confetti Cannon” episode: https://gimletmedia.com/shows/reply-all/dvh64g (https://gimletmedia.com/shows/reply-all/dvh64g) The other side of the argument that Reply All got more political: https://www.reddit.com/r/replyallpodcast/comments/ju3ly4/hottakereplyallisnotgettingmorepolitical/gca58cv?utmsource=share&utmmedium=web2x&context=3 (https://www.reddit.com/r/replyallpodcast/comments/ju3ly4/hot_take_reply_all_is_not_getting_more_political/gca58cv?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3) Fresh Air on the nature of the protest: https://www.npr.org/2021/02/25/971319812/reporters-video-from-inside-senate-on-jan-6-shows-a-crowd-prepared-for-violence (https://www.npr.org/2021/02/25/971319812/reporters-video-from-inside-senate-on-jan-6-shows-a-crowd-prepared-for-violence) NY Times on Deadspin’s implosion: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/31/business/media/deadspin-was-a-good-website.html (https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/31/business/media/deadspin-was-a-good-website.html) Defector’s story on Mike Pesca: https://defector.com/mike-pesca-slate-suspended/ (https://defector.com/mike-pesca-slate-suspended/) NY Times on Pesca: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/22/business/media/slate-mike-pesca-suspended.html (https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/22/business/media/slate-mike-pesca-suspended.html) “Eschew the Taboo: The pernicious effects of banning words” by Christopher Hitchens: https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2006/12/hatred-will-always-outpace-linguistic-correctness.html (https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2006/12/hatred-will-always-outpace-linguistic-correctness.html) Ta-Nehisi Coates on use/mention: https://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2010/11/to-conversate/66929/ (https://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2010/11/to-conversate/66929/) John McWhorter on use/mention: https://johnmcwhorter.substack.com/p/the-n-word-as-slur-vs-the-n-word (https://johnmcwhorter.substack.com/p/the-n-word-as-slur-vs-the-n-word) Margaret Sullivan with a confusing column: https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/media/mike-pesca-donald-mcneil-n-word-media/2021/02/24/fe89d010-76a1-11eb-8115-9ad5e9c02117story.html?itid=apmargaretsullivan (https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/media/mike-pesca-donald-mcneil-n-word-media/2021/02/24/fe89d010-76a1-11eb-8115-9ad5e9c02117_story.html?itid=ap_margaretsullivan) Stefan Fatsis on this debate in Slate alllllll the way back in 2020: https://slate.com/culture/2020/07/scrabble-offensive-words-ban-player-reaction.html (https://slate.com/culture/2020/07/scrabble-offensive-words-ban-player-reaction.html) The episode of The Gist where Pesca mentions nonbinary pronouns: https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2019/07/acosta-out-emily-bazelon-charged-kamala-harris-gun-laws.html (https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2019/07/acosta-out-emily-bazelon-charged-kamala-harris-gun-laws.html) Michael Powell’s crazy story about Smith College: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/24/us/smith-college-race.html (https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/24/us/smith-college-race.html) The ACLU ACLU-ing, hard: https://www.aclu.org/blog/racial-justice/race-and-criminal-justice/smith-college-overhauls-policing-practices-after-black (https://www.aclu.org/blog/racial-justice/race-and-criminal-justice/smith-college-overhauls-policing-practices-after-black) Cathy Young on the "Napping Whilte Black" story at Yale, which was significantly more complicated: https://thebulwark.com/standing-up-to-the-moral-outrage-industry/ (https://thebulwark.com/standing-up-to-the-moral-outrage-industry/) Jodi Shaw's latter, as published by Bari Weiss: https://bariweiss.substack.com/p/whistleblower-at-smith-college-resigns (https://bariweiss.substack.com/p/whistleblower-at-smith-college-resigns) Katie on disappearing lesbians: https://andrewsullivan.substack.com/p/where-have-all-the-lesbians-gone-0a7 (https://andrewsullivan.substack.com/p/where-have-all-the-lesbians-gone-0a7) Glenn Greenwald on his experience "trending as a transphobe and biphobe": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXXJoOsdoNE&feature=youtu.be&ab_channel=GlennGreenwald (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXXJoOsdoNE&feature=youtu.be&ab_channel=GlennGreenwald)
56 min
Pitchfork Economics with Nick Hanauer
Pitchfork Economics with Nick Hanauer
Civic Ventures
The velocity of money (with Ann Pettifor)
Over the last century, the velocity of money—the rate at which money changes hands through the economy—has declined. Today, money moves at one of the slowest rates on record, meaning every dollar today generates 70% less economic activity than a dollar did just ten years ago. That has big implications for our economy. Political economist Ann Pettifor joins Nick and Goldy to explain how the velocity of money is related to money creation, and why taxing the rich is ultimately pro-growth (it’s all related, we promise!).  Ann Pettifor is a political economist, author, and public speaker, and the Director of PRIME (Policy Research in Macroeconomics). Her work focuses on the global financial system, sovereign debt restructuring, international finance, and sustainable development. She is the author of many books, including The Production of Money and The Case for the Green New Deal.  Twitter: @AnnPettifor Show us some love by leaving a rating or a review! RateThisPodcast.com/pitchforkeconomics  Further reading:  Want to expand the economy? Tax the rich!  https://prospect.org/power/want-expand-economy-tax-rich/  A world awash in money: https://media.bain.com/Images/BAIN_REPORT_A_world_awash_in_money.pdf What does money velocity tell us about low inflation in the U.S.? https://www.stlouisfed.org/on-the-economy/2014/september/what-does-money-velocity-tell-us-about-low-inflation-in-the-us  Vultures are circling our fragile economy… https://www.annpettifor.com/2020/06/vultures-are-circling-our-fragile-economy/  Decades of empirical research finds no inverse correlation between top tax rates and growth:  https://archive.org/stream/R42111TaxRatesandEconomicGrowth-crs/R42111%20Tax%20Rates%20and%20Economic%20Growth_djvu.txt https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/09_Effects_Income_Tax_Changes_Economic_Growth_Gale_Samwick.pdf http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/107919/1/Hope_economic_consequences_of_major_tax_cuts_published.pdf  https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2016/04/20/a-graphical-assault-on-supply-side-tax-cuts/  Website: http://pitchforkeconomics.com/ Twitter: @PitchforkEcon Instagram: @pitchforkeconomics Nick’s twitter: @NickHanauer
42 min
Short Circuit
Short Circuit
Institute for Justice
Short Circuit 163 | The Law of Johnny 5 Is Alive
For once living up to the 1980s-movie-sense of our name, we’re talking about robots. How should the law treat robots? What do we analogize to, the law of traditional machines? Animals? Something else? How should that law be “made,” by courts or by legislatures? And how does the Constitution interact with artificial intelligence? When a robot writes a novel is it “speech?” In a special Short Circuit, we look into all of these questions with our guest Ed Walters, founder and CEO of Fastcase, and an adjunct professor who teaches robot and artificial intelligence law at Georgetown Law School. Transcript: https://ij.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/short-circuit-163_otter.ai_.pdf Copyrighting all the melodies to avoid accidental-infringement, https://www.ted.com/talks/damien_riehl_copyrighting_all_the_melodies_to_avoid_accidental_infringement I, Robot, http://ekladata.com/-Byix64G_NtE0xI4A6PA1--o1Hc/Asimov-Isaac-I-Robot.pdf Ed Walters: https://www.law.georgetown.edu/faculty/edward-j-walters/ Anthony Sanders: https://ij.org/staff/asanders/ iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/short-circuit/id309062019 Spotify: https://podcasters.spotify.com/podcast/1DFCqDbZTI7kIws11kEhed/overview Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/institute-for-justice/short-circuit Google: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iz26kyzdcpodkfm5cpz7rlvf76a Newsletter: ij.org/about-us/shortcircuit/ Want to email us? shortcircuit@ij.org
52 min
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