60| Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology – with Dr. Bryan Kolb
Play • 1 hr 11 min

The book Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology was born of a need that Dr. Bryan Kolb recognized while completing his postdoctoral fellowship at the Montreal Neurological Institute with Dr. Brenda Milner.  Dr. Kolb had asked his colleagues for a textbook on the human brain and, finding none, decided to create a course about “neuropsychology.”  Now, Drs. Kolb and Whishaw’s textbook is about to be released in its 8th edition.  John and Ryan talk with Dr. Kolb about his book, the contribution of animal research to human neuropsychology, the importance of the history of our field, advice on working with a co-author, and much more.

Show notes are available at www.NavNeuro.com/60

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[Note: This podcast and all linked content is intended for general educational purposes only and does not constitute the practice of psychology or any other professional healthcare advice and services. No professional relationship is formed between hosts and listeners. All content is to be used at listeners’ own risk. Users should always seek appropriate medical and psychological care from their licensed healthcare provider.]

The Daily Poem
The Daily Poem
Goldberry Studios
Luci Shaw's "Advent Visitation"
This week we're sharing Luci Shaw's advent and Christmas-themed poems with you. Up next: "Advent Visitation. " Biography from LuciShaw.com Luci Shaw was born in 1928 in London, England, and has lived in Canada, Australia and the U.S.A. A 1953 high honors graduate of Wheaton College in Illinois, she became co-founder and later president of Harold Shaw Publishers, and since 1988 has been a Writer in Residence at Regent College, Vancouver, Canada. A charter member of the Chrysostom Society of Writers, Shaw is author of eleven volumes of poetry including Sea Glass: New & Selected Poems (WordFarm, 2016), Thumbprint in the Clay: Divine Marks of Beauty, Order and Grace (InterVarsity Press, 2016), Polishing the Petoskey Stone (Shaw, 1990), Writing the River (Pinon Press, 1994/Regent Publishing, 1997), The Angles of Light (Waterbrook, 2000), The Green Earth: Poems of Creation (Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2002), has edited three poetry anthologies and a festschrift, The Swiftly Tilting Worlds of Madeleine L’Engle, (Shaw, 1998). Her most recent books are What the Light Was Like (Word Farm), Accompanied by Angels(Eerdmans),  The Genesis of It All (Paraclete), and Breath for the Bones: Art, Imagination & Spirit (Nelson). Her poetic work and essays have been widely anthologized. Shaw has authored several non-fiction prose books, including Water My Soul: Cultivating the Interior Life (Zondervan) and The Crime of Living Cautiously (InterVarsity). She has also co-authored three books with Madeleine L’Engle, WinterSong (Regent), Friends for the Journey (Regent), and A Prayer Book for Spiritual Friends (Augsburg/Fortress). See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
6 min
FOR DUMMIES: The Podcast
FOR DUMMIES: The Podcast
TWA Podcast Studio
While you’re home learn the lucrative world of day trading!
There’s a common misconception that you can declare yourself a day trader, sit down at the computer in your bathrobe, and you’re going to be so busy counting the money you make, you’ll hardly have a chance to take lunch breaks. In reality, it is an incredible amount of work and requires discipline, education, attention to detail, and expert advice! This week we are joined by Annie Logue, MBA, the author of “Day Trading for Dummies.” Annie's an accomplished financial journalist as well as a lecturer at the University of Illinois at Chicago. This podcast may not earn you a UIC diploma, but I promise it’ll make you smarter about day trading. About Eric Martsolf With over 3500 episodes of television under his belt, Mr. Martsolf has been providing "love in the afternoon" for NBC Daytime for the last 17 years. His portrayals of Ethan Winthrop on "Passions" and currently Brady Black on "Days of our Lives" have resulted in numerous industry accolades. He made daytime history in 2014 by being the first actor ever to win an Emmy in the Best Supporting Actor category for "Days of our Lives." His television credits expand into primetime (Extant, NCIS, Rizzoli & Isles), and his musical theatre repertoire consists of over 40 productions, including his critically acclaimed role as the Pharaoh in the Osmond Broadway Tour of "Joseph." Fans of the DC Universe will most notably recognize him as Justice League member and futuristic hero Booster Goldfrom the series Smallville. @ericmartsolf - Twitter (Blue check mark) ericmartsolf - Instagram (Blue check mark) About Annie Logue, MBA Annie is highly experience in financial services and has taught business administration at the University of Illinois. She is a finance writer who has written numerous articles on investment and has edited publications on equity trading and risk management. @annielogue - Twitter
27 min
Juicebox Podcast: Type 1 Diabetes
Juicebox Podcast: Type 1 Diabetes
Scott Benner
#430 Poodle Power
Esther is a type 1 who has a diabetic alert service dog. She also has hypothyroidism. Show notes for people who are Bold with Insulin > Get a FREE Omnipod Demo today > Gvoke Glucagon the only Pre-Mixed glucagon > Learn about Touched By Type 1 > CONTOUR NEXT ONE smart meter and CONTOUR DIABETES app > Find out more about the Dexcom CGM Add your voice to the T1DExchange A full list of our sponsors How to listen, disclaimer and more Apple Podcasts> Subscribe to the podcast today! The podcast is available on Spotify, Google Play, iHeartRadioRadio Public, Amazon Music and all Android devices The show is now available as an Alexa skill. My type 1 diabetes parenting blog Arden's Day Listen to the Juicebox Podcast online Read my award winning memoir: Life Is Short, Laundry Is Eternal: Confessions of a Stay-At-Home Dad The Juicebox Podcast is a free show, but if you'd like to support the podcast directly, you can make a gift here. Thank you! Follow Scott on Social Media @ArdensDay @JuiceboxPodcast Disclaimer - Nothing you hear on the Juicebox Podcast or read on Arden's Day is intended as medical advice. You should always consult a physician before making changes to your health plan. If the podcast has helped you to live better with type 1 please tell someone else how to find the show and consider leaving a rating and review on iTunes. Thank you! Arden's Day and The Juicebox Podcast are not charitable organizations.
1 hr 16 min
Fiction Writing Made Easy
Fiction Writing Made Easy
Savannah Gilbo
What is a Book Coach?
*In today's episode, I'm going to cover all the different ways a book coach can help you finish your draft and become a stronger writer. *Here's a preview of what's included: [01:15] A book coach is someone who guides a writer through the entire book writing process from start to finish while giving editorial feedback, accountability, and support along the way. * *[04:20] Generally speaking, you can work with a book coach any time -- that’s kind of the beauty of book coaches… they’ll dive in and meet you where you’re at. Plus, a few different scenarios in which a book coach can help you. [06:30] Tip #1: Ask yourself what you're looking for in a coach. What kind of coaching style works best for you? Do you want to meet on the phone or communicate via email only? [07:05] Tip #2: Decide whether expertise or experience in your genre is necessary. Make sure that the coach you're thinking about working with doesn't dislike your genre! [07:45] Tip #3: Read their website thoroughly. Do they have any certifications or special skills that might be relevant to your story? Do they read widely in your genre? Do they have testimonials from writers they've previously worked with? [08:35] Tip #4: See if you can get them on the phone. Just like in real life, you will probably know pretty quickly if you jive with this person or not. Trust your instincts! [09:25] Tip #5: Ask them if they think they're the right coach for you! Many coaches will be honest about this and if they're not the best fit, they can recommend you to someone else who might be a more perfect fit for you and your story. [10:30] Key points and episode recap. *Subscribe & Review in Apple Podcasts* Are you subscribed to my podcast? If you’re not, I want to encourage you to do that today. I don’t want you to miss an episode! Especially because I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix and if you’re not subscribed there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. So, click here to subscribe to the show in Apple Podcasts! If you're already a subscriber, and if you enjoy the show, I would be really grateful if you left a review over on Apple Podcasts, too. Those reviews help other writers find my podcast and they’re also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let me know what your favorite part of the show is. Thanks in advance! *Links mentioned in this episode:* * Do you want to work with a book coach on your story? Click here to learn more about my one-on-one book coaching services.  P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join and you can request access here. Hope to see you there!
12 min
The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience
The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience
Kelton Reid
How NY Times Bestselling Memoirist Dani Shapiro Writes
#PodcastersForJustice Award-winning, New York Times bestselling author Dani Shapiro, chatted with me about the Groundhog's Day effect of the pandemic, the transition from fiction to memoir, and the hidden power of Family Secrets. "There's no check the boxes kind of 'career development,' or anything like that, that exists in the creative life. People think that there is, and that they're not doing it right. And there's no right." — Dani Shapiro Dani is the author of 10 books including the instant New York Times bestselling memoir, Inheritance, which was published in 2019. Her other books include the memoirs Hourglass, Still Writing, Devotion, and Slow Motion, and five novels including Black & White and Family History. Inheritance won the 2019 National Jewish Book Award, was named one of Wired’s top Science books of 2019 and a best book of 2019 by Vanity Fair. It was also a book club pick for Now Read This, the PBS NewsHour’s book club with The New York Times. “A meditation on what it means to live in a time when secrecy, anonymity, and mystery are vanishing.” — The New Yorker Dani has taught at Columbia and New York University, is the co-founder of the Sirenland Writers Conference in Positano, Italy, and teaches writing workshops around the world. In early 2019, Dani launched an original podcast, Family Secrets, in collaboration with iHeartMedia. An iTunes Top 10 podcast, the series features "...stories from guests who — like Dani — have uncovered life-altering and long-hidden secrets from their families’ past." Stay tuned for a special offer from this week's sponsor Neuro. NOTE: Our apologies for any audio issues with our podcast guest interview. We hope it doesn't distract from the important message of this episode. Thank you! If you’re a fan of The Writer Files, please click subscribe to automatically see new interviews. In this file Dani Shapiro and I discussed: * How to change the rhythm of your day to spark creativity * Her mentors and awakening to her writing voice * Learning to write in public (and find an agent the right way) * On throwing out hundreds of pages * The power of storytelling in the aftermath of family trauma * And much more! Show Notes: * DaniShapiro.com * Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity, and Love by Dani Shapiro [Amazon] * ‎Family Secrets on Apple Podcasts * William Faulkner's Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech C.1950 * The Essay on Self Reliance - Ralph Waldo Emerson * Dani Shapiro on Instagram * Dani Shapiro on Facebook * Dani Shapiro on Twitter * Kelton Reid on Twitter
42 min
StarDate Podcast
StarDate Podcast
McDonald Observatory
Moon and Mars
A lot of water is frozen in the Martian ice caps. And there may be a lot of liquid water below them. Such locations might be good places to look for signs of microscopic life. Scientists discovered the first evidence of water below the south polar ice cap a couple of years ago. They used radar aboard a Mars-orbiting spacecraft to peer through the ice. It showed a possible pool of water almost 20 miles wide. It could be as little as a few inches deep, but it could be much deeper. A more recent study, using several more years of observations, strengthened the evidence for that pool. And it found three more possible pools nearby — each of them a few miles wide. The Martian atmosphere is too thin to allow liquid water to exist at the surface — it would quickly boil away. Below the ice caps, though, it’s a different story. The combination of high pressure and high levels of salinity may allow water to exist in liquid form for a long time — perhaps millions of years. And as long as the levels of minerals in the water aren’t too high, it’s possible that the pools could support microscopic life — making them prime targets for future studies. And Mars is in great view tonight. The planet is high in the south as night falls, above the Moon. It looks like a bright orange star. It’s a little closer to the upper right of the Moon as they set in the wee hours of the morning. Tomorrow: rare metals in distant skies. Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory
2 min
Stoic Coffee Break
Stoic Coffee Break
Erick Cloward
170 - Boundaries
Today I want to talk about how Stoicism can help us set healthy boundaries. Learning how to set healthy boundaries is not easy. I was never really taught how to do this, and so I’ve been learning how to do this over the last few years, and honestly, it’s been a challange. _“To achieve freedom and happiness, you need to grasp this basic truth: some things in life are under your control, and others are not.”_ _- Epictetus_ The first and most important teaching of Stoicism is that there are things that we control, and things we cannot and that we should focus on the things that we can control and let go of the rest. This seems like a very clear concepts, but is one of the hardest things to master. Truly understanding and taking responsibility for the things that you can control is hard. It is much easier to blame our misfortunes and unhappiness on things outside of ourselves. But every time we do this, we allow ourselves to become a victim, and come no closer to solving the issue we’re dealing with. But how do we deal with things that we can’t control, but have a big impact on us? For example, we can’t control what other people do or say. Does this mean that we have to just let them do what they are going to do and just live with however their actions impact us? I think that Stoicism gives us some tools to handle these situations. First lets talk about what a boundary is. A boundary is a clear statement about what your actions will be in a given situation. It is letting the other person know what you will do. It is not telling someone else what to do. Setting a boundary is not the same as an ultimatum. When we set boundaries we are acting on the things that we control, namely, what we say and what we do. We let others know how we will respond in a given situation. We don’t tell others what to do, because that is not within our control. This is really hard for most of us to do. We want to control the things and people around us. But when we try to control others, we are not taking responsibility for the things that we can control. We often try to do this through all kinds of ways - manipulation, coercion, threats, ultimatums. All of which are trying to control the actions of others, most of which generally fail. Why is it important to set healthy boundaries? Figuring out your boundaries helps you understand what you want, and how you want to be treated. It is a way for you to define your values. It is how you stand up for yourself. Setting boundaries is how you let other people know how you want to be treated. It improves relationships because you let the other person know how they can respect and support you. Setting boundaries, especially where you haven’t before, can be very challenging. Often when you start to set boundaries with people that weren’t there before, there is resistance. The other person might get upset because they like how things are. They might try to test the boundaries that you have set up, which is why it is important that you hold your boundaries. Maintaining your boundaries is how you respect and take care of yourself. How do we set healthy boundaries? There are a few steps to creating healthy boundaries. First define what is acceptable behavior. Decide what things uphold your values and what things do not. Decide what you will and won’t put up with. Second, decide what action you will take in response. Remember, this is about you and your actions. It is not telling the other person what they have to do. Third, communicate this boundary to the other person. You don’t have to explain yourself. You don’t have to justify why you are setting this boundary. You have the right to determine what you do and do not want to do. Also, remember that this is not an ultimatum, but a statement of what your actions will be. Fourth, hold up your end of the bargain and take action when necessary. In some cases, setting a boundary is as simple as saying “no”. Whether in relationships at work, or with family and friends, a clear and concise no is often the best way to create healthy relationships. It lets others know how they can respect your space and time. Remember, you do not have to explain yourself. For some people this is hard, and as a recovering people pleaser, doubly so. We each have the right to determine what we will or won’t do. Sometimes setting and maintaining boundaries is a little more involved. Lets say you have friend who frequently gets drunk whenever you go out together and it bothers you. When they’re drunk, they get loud and obnoxious. Maybe it’s led to some uncomfortable situations. Setting a clear boundary would be letting them know that if they continue to get drunk when you are out together that you will excuse yourself and head home. In this case, you made it clear what actions you will take in that situation. You did not tell your friend that they have to stop drinking. You just make it clear what you will do. The next time you are out with your friend, and they decide to get drunk, you politely but firmly excuse yourself. The last aspect I want to discuss is making sure that we respect the boundaries of others. When someone else has set a boundary, do we acknowledge it and to our best we respect it? Do we try to persuade or talk them out of it? Do we get frustrated and try to bully them? Recognizing and respecting the boundaries of others is a clear recognition that we can’t control other people. Learning how to set boundaries is a process of defining your values, and understanding your value. It is how you let others know how you want to be treated. Think of it as creating a guide book to you.
7 min
Education Bookcast
Education Bookcast
Stanislaw Pstrokonski
102. Psychology is overrated
I endeavour to understand and explain the field of education through many disciplines, including neuroscience, cognitive science, psychology, anthropology, economics, and evolutionary biology. Over the course of this podcast's history, I have changed in my reading habits and focus across these disciplines, and in my attitude as to how useful they can be, and where they are best applied. Psychology stands out as a case in point. At first, I thought that psychology would hold all the secrets to knowing how to improve education, by revealing what motivates people, how they think, and how they learn, and showing behavioural "laws" or tendencies that explain the framework from which we should approach understanding ourselves and others. Since then, I have realised that the psychological subfield of cognitive science has profound implications for learning, but the rest of psychology has been a disappointment. Firstly, it suffers from sampling bias. Almost all those who have been tested in psychological experiments are Western university undergraduates. This introduces a cultural bias to the data, and so rather than explaining universal features of humanity (as it supposes), it actually uncovers peculiarities of Western culture. This is dramatically less useful than what I had hoped for, and is no foundation on which to build an understanding of humanity as a whole. Secondly, it has frequent replication issues. There are numerous studies which become famous and frequently cited, only to be shown down the line not to replicate, invalidating their apparently tremendous insight. One high-profile example of this is mindset research, popularised by Carol Dweck, which I mistakenly lauded again and again on this podcast, only to find out down the line that replication studies have shown it not to be such a big deal. In place of psychology, I argue that anthropology and economics are powerful fields that can bring a lot to the table. Anthropology is like psychology but with proper sampling, and economics is like psychology but with much simplified models, which are flawed but also more powerful than many people realise (myself included, until recently). Bringing these two fields in essentially says that culture matters, and we can only understand human universals by looking cross-culturally; that we "fish in water", blind to the forces that shape us all, and we can only see these with outsider's spectacles; that value is a fundamental thing that everyone seeks, and that needs elucidating; and that people more often than not behave in a way that is in line with their own desires. In the episode, I discuss all these, plus also a range of other disciplines that have appeared or will appear on the podcast. Enjoy the episode.
46 min
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