Geese 101
51 min

In this episode of Mother Earth News and Friends, we chat with Hank Will, editor-at-large for MOTHER EARTH NEWS. He covers what you need to know to successfully raise your own gaggle of geese, such as habitat, disposition, and safety, and he also shares his own experience with raising these birds.

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The Thriving Farmer Podcast
The Thriving Farmer Podcast
Michael Kilpatrick
101. Adam and Jordan on Thriving Mycologically
Have you ever considered taking a completely different kind of farming journey? Adam Cohen and Jordan Jent join us today from Texas Fungus, hailing from Fort Worth and supplying all of Northern Texas. Jordan started Texas Fungus in the Fall of 2016 and now grows the most premium mushrooms in the area and beyond. The original farm began in a one-car garage and has since relocated to Arlington, TX in a 2,000 sq.ft. facility after Jordan partnered with Adam in January 2019. The farm has been expanding and thriving ever since. Join us to learn all about how they cultivate the best damn mushrooms in Texas! You’ll hear: How Jordan and Adam got started working with mushrooms 1:06 What makes growing mushrooms different from other crops 10:06 What a typical day at Texas Fungus looks like 11:45 How much time Jordan and Adam spend on the farm 16:41 How they prioritize important tasks 18:00 The most difficult thing they’ve encountered after starting their business 22:04 How Jordan and Adam advise learning about mushroom production to newcomers 29:38 How roles are divided on Texas Fungus 36:29 Which of their products sell best in Fort Worth and surrounding areas 50:26 What the whole growing process looks like 56:01 The biggest mistakes Adam and Jordan see newer farmers making 1.03:25 Their favorite farming tool 1.11:20 How Jordan and Adam feel about the prospect of starting a new farm today 1.15:53 Where you can learn more about Adam, Jordan, and Texas Fungus 1.19:36 What they’re currently doing with their grow kits 1.20:53 About the Guests: Adam Cohen is a former school teacher (Math, Science, Agriculture), who spent much of the last 15 years working with hydroponics and aquaponics. Struggling to find a way to balance the time needed to be an effective teacher with the needs of running a successful farm, Adam kept looking for ways to be more efficient and to do more with less. A chance meeting in late 2018 introduced him to Jordan Jent and the two partnered up to build Texas Fungus, a small artisan mushroom farm in the heart of the DFW Metroplex. Jent, a former Chef with a self-professed "black-thumb" had been growing mushrooms for a short time and was looking to find a way to bring a new connection to the DFW food-scene that had not existed in the area prior. Since January of 2019, Adam and Jordan have overcome a number of challenges and growing pains as they work to bring the #bestdamnmushrooms to DFW. In the fall of 2017, Jordan Jent received a mushroom kit as a gift that didn't fruit out. About that same time, he was also looking for a way out of the 9 to 5 corporate rat race. As a former chef, he still found himself looking for ways to be connected to the local DFW food scene. After the failed kit, Jordan stumbled upon mushroom growing and went down the rabbit hole. One year later in 2018, Jordan decided to go all-in and leave the simplicity of a 40-hour work week and good benefits for a life of mushroom farming, providing the #bestdamnmushroomsindfw to local chefs. After partnering up with Adam Cohen in the beginning of 2019, they expanded from 5 restaurants and 50lbs per week to 30+ restaurants and 250lbs per week by the end of 2019. Resources: Website - www.texasfungus.com Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/texasfungus/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/texas_fungus/
1 hr 25 min
In Search of Soil
In Search of Soil
Diego Footer
Full Show: Peter McCoy - Mycology |In Search of Soil #7
One of the members of the soil ecology that is mentioned on a generalized note is fungi. Although we recognize their importance, there aren’t a lot of specifics tied to mycology—and that’s because there’s still a lot we don’t know about them. As a branch of science, mycology is still relatively new and a lot less studied compared to other fields of study. Today, we have mycologist Peter McCoy to shed some more light on fungi from a deeply mycological perspective. Peter McCoy is a mycologist and mycology educator with 17 years of experience. Known for mushroom cultivation and mycological remediation, he authored Radical Mycology, a 650-page book of condensed knowledge about fungi. He also created Mycologos in response to the growing need for accessible mycological education. Learn from Peter at https://mycologos.world/ WATCH FULL EPISODES YouTube https://bit.ly/watchISOS Follow Diego @diegofooter - https://www.instagram.com/diegofooter In this episode of In Search of Soil * How are mycelia faring in this day and age? (02:09) * Fungi are the first to come back from the most detriment (03:18) * 7% of CO2 are from humans and 85% comes from the soil (06:00) * Fungal respiration (07:06) * We’re living in the fungi and plants’ world (08:14) * The paradigm shift when studying fungi (09:13) * Tons of undiscovered science behind fungi (11:11) * Mycology: we don’t know what we don’t know yet (11:46) * Fungal mycology and human intersections with mycology (12:18) * We’re in the fourth era of the human-fungal history (13:13) * Mycology is a neglected mega science (15:25) * Where agriculture’s understanding of mycology is (16:02) * Mycology isn’t learned about (17:41) * Shifting the awareness about fungi (18:40) * Fungi in a culinary standpoint (19:58) * Fungi in an agricultural standpoint (20:33) * Fungal mycelium and their compounds may be the primary source of carbon in whole soil communities (22:22) * What exactly is mycelium made of? (27:35) * The fungal cell wall (28:36) * How readily viable is sloughed off fungi? (30:55) * If fungi pair up with plants, how much carbon is produced by the plants, and how much is produced by the fungi? (33:28) * What can a plant do if it’s been stripped off from its relationship with the microorganisms it’s dependent on? (38:18) * Plants have evolved to be entirely dependent on fungi (40:10) * Why some plants don’t form robust relationships with microorganisms (43:35) * The definition of a mycorrhiza (44:44) * Dark septate endophytes or DSEs (45:38) * Does crop rotation make sense in the perspective of plant-fungi relationships? (47:30) * Given a robust soil ecosystem, would fungal intervention suffice in keeping the harmful pathogens away from the plant? (54:43) * Withholding fertilizer application because the soil ecosystem fertilizes itself (58:23) * Trichoderma species of mold (01:00:57) * Assuming there isn’t good fungi in the soil, will the good fungi show up if you take care of your soil well enough? (01:03:36) * Are quickly made compost beneficial to developing fungi? (01:07:12) * What fungi do you need? (01:09:44) * What kind of fungi do you want to encourage to grow in the soil as much as possible? (01:13:33) * Putting in all stages of decomposition in your compost pile (01:19:02) * Is there any heat in fungal decomposition? (01:21:40) * Going about speeding up wood chip compost (01:24:02) * The go-to: garden giant mushroom (01:24:47) * The ideal temperature to speed up composting in a lab setting (01:26:45) * Optimum moisture for fungi (01:28:28) * Oxygen and decomposition: are there fungi that thrive in low oxygen? (01:30:02) * Are we adding fungal food when we add finished compost? (01:32:32) * Soil amendments that benefit fungi (01:34:20) * Growing mycology with community science (01:38:40) * Propagating resident fungi and re-inoculating (01:40:55) * Do compost teas make sense and are they really doing anything (01:45:21) * Propagation: the limiting factor is air agitation (01:47:48) * Stick to paying attention on keeping what’s above ground healthy (01:52:47) * Nature will find a way to put things in place where they belong (01:55:32) * Concentrate on bringing back as much diversity as possible (01:56:35) * A fungal perspective on biochar (01:57:00) * Mycologos, Radical Mycology by Peter McCoy (01:59:38) * Diego wraps up the episode with where to get in touch with Peter McCoy (02:03:28) * Accountability and intellectual honesty (01:05:20) * Anyone can make a mycological breakthrough tomorrow (02:07:33) * Arbuscular mycorrhiza: a mycological mindblower (02:08:31)
2 hr 13 min
Pantry Chat
Pantry Chat
Homesteading Family
A Homesteading Family Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving is almost here and that means food and lots of it! Prepping a big Thanksgiving feast can be challenging, but having a good strategy in place can make all the difference between being thankful or being stressed in the kitchen.  In this episode of Pantry Chat, Josh and Carolyn share their own Thanksgiving menu, plus a few of their fun annual traditions, and some tips that can help you plan ahead to create a memorable and blessed holiday with your family.  *In this Episode* * Get some of Carolyn and Josh’s favorite holiday recipes as well as Carolyn’s “go-to” pie crust.  * Why is Thanksgiving Josh and Carolyn’s favorite holiday?  * Why is sharing and giving thanks so important during this time?  * What is “Mayflower Night” and some of the other family traditions that Carolyn and Josh have every Thanksgiving?   * Why it’s OK to have pie for breakfast (Josh has a good reason!)  * What is on the menu for Thanksgiving this year at Josh and Carolyn’s house?  * Why you should write out your entire menu first and start by working backward? * The importance of having extra butter on hand.  * What to plan for dinner for the night before and what is a good breakfast option for Thanksgiving morning?  * Why BYOD (bring your own dishes) is a great alternative for reducing waste.  * Find someone you can bless and invite them to dinner this year.    * Question of the day: Annette asks, “do you have a preferred supplier for all your jars?”* * *Resources: * * Favorite holiday recipes  * BCS Two Wheel Tractors * Follow Homesteading Family on Instagram * Follow Homesteading Family on Facebook
32 min
The Abundant Edge
The Abundant Edge
Abundant Edge
The fascinating new science of regenerating soil, with Matt Powers, author of “regenerative soil”
Now that I've wrapped up the series on waterway regeneration, I wanted to transition into a two episode deep dive into an essential component of water cycle health and how it affects the land by analysing the most elemental component of a healthy ecology, and that of course is soil. There’ve been a ton of new developments and research in this field in a very short time as scientists and agronomists alike are uncovering new insights into mineral cycles, the soil food web, plant and mycological relationships, and so much more.  Now you could sort through a small library of work to get a complete picture of all of these new developments, or you could save time and find them all in one brilliant new book called Regenerative Soil by my good friend Matt Powers, the author of many well known volumes including the Permaculture Student volumes one and two, Unstoppable Enthusiasm, and now even volumes for children including the newest, The Forgotten Food Forest which can all be found on his website along with many online courses at thepermaculturestudent.com But of course today, we’ll be focusing on the cutting edge of soil science and how these new discoveries can help you in a very practical way to improve the health of the soil on your land and grow the highest quality food anywhere.  In this session Matt unpacks and simplifies concepts like Eh and redox scales, Exclusion zone water, and soil amendments for any kind of deficiency. We also talk about how this new information has changed the way he manages his own garden and his advice for some of the best practices for large scale soil improvement. Resources: https://www.thepermaculturestudent.com/ https://abundantearthfoundation.org/
1 hr 10 min
Regenerative Agriculture Podcast
Regenerative Agriculture Podcast
John Kempf
Reversing Soil Degradation with Dwayne Beck
Dr. Dwayne Beck is well known for being one of the pioneers of no-till agriculture in central South Dakota and across the High Plains. For more than three decades, Dr. Beck has been creating comprehensive systems for both irrigated and dryland crop production throughout the region, educating growers on the power of crop rotation, diversity, and other regenerative practices. He currently serves as the Research Manager at the Dakota Lakes Research Farm, a non-profit made up of farmers committed to sustainable land practices. On today’s episode, John and Dwayne discuss: * Dwayne’s background and his earlier work assisting local growers with their irrigation systems * The continuing decline of the Ogallala Aquifer and how water infiltration can be improved by implementing no-till agricultural practices. * Addressing the often-overlooked aspects of irrigation, such as percolation and water delivery, and how it affects soil health. * Dwayne’s observations on lake bottom soils, the power of macropores, and the prevalence of summer fallowing in the High Plains. * Utilizing de-percolation strategies to maintain proper nutrient levels in your soil. * Using competition, sanitation, and rotation to control weeds, diseases and insects. * Dwayne’s historical research on nutrient cycling and fertilizer placement. * Dwayne offers up a broader historical perspective on how agriculture, human nature, and mother nature work together. * A discussion on why moving to no-till options for all crops including potatoes, carrots and sugar beets are engineering and genetics problems. * The shared vision, but much different methods, between regenerative agriculture vs. organic agriculture.
1 hr 16 min
Soil Sense
Soil Sense
NDSU Extension
The Importance of Extension with Dr. Greg Lardy
**Join us virtually at the DIRT Workshop December 8th - 9th: _www.DIRTWorkshopND.com_** Extension has a rich history in keeping producers informed and up to date. Dr. Greg Lardy has seen the growth and expansion of these programs and gives us insight into what makes the extension valuable and how it is adapting to the changing times. A beef cattle nutritionist by training, Dr. Lardy is currently the Vice President for Agricultural Affairs at North Dakota State University. In this capacity, he serves as the Dean of the College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources; the Director of the NDSU Extension, and the Director of the North Dakota Experiment Station. So basically day-today he is tasked with managing all activities that relate to agriculture at NDSU. “How we deliver programs has changed, but the core mission of what we do in terms of using education to transform lives and help people see a better future and achieve a better future is really still at the very heart of what we do” - Dr. Greg Lardy Dr. Lardy remembers as a child visiting the extension building to find a wall of printed bulletins that producers could look through to find answers to their questions. Producers are now accessing internet sources to find these answers. Keeping research and information more readily accessible has been a priority for the extension program whether that be online, in person or in printed material. Beyond offering the information, Dr. Lardy also emphasizes the importance of creating measurable metrics to identify the efficacy of the information being shared. Going forward, Dr. Lardy sees the need for a continual and perpetual push for connectivity with producers and consumers. “Even though we are engaged right now with stakeholders, we've got to be more engaged with listening to the needs of our constituents and taxpayers out there. What are they saying? What do they need to help them live better lives across the state of North Dakota?” - Dr Greg Lardy This Week on Soil Sense: * Meet Dr. Greg Lardy, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources and the Director of the NDSU Extension * Explore the core mission of the Extension Program and what it offers producers * Discover how the program is continually evolving to be more accessible and stay relevant with producers and their needs. Connect with Soil Sense: * _Soil Sense Initiative _ Soil Sense Podcast is hosted by _Tim Hammerich_ of the _Future of Agriculture Podcast_.
22 min
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