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May 14, 2014
51: There Is No Crying in Strcpy
Play episode · 1 hr 22 min

Jen Costillo (@r0b0ts0nf1r3) joins Elecia and Christopher to discuss their experiences interviewing (both as interviewer and interviewee).

Elecia did an hour long webinar on how to conduct technical interviews. In this show, she mentions a good post-interview ratings system.

Google discovered that their brainteasers are not a very effective way to interview.

Despite the news that swearing is good for you, we tried to bleep everything.

Also, it is minesweeper, not minefield. What were we thinking? It was obviously all Christopher’s fault. Though we should have stood up to him. 

Elecia's book has more interview questions but from the perspective of how do you ask a question and what do you look for in a response.

The Contextual Electronics Podcast
The Contextual Electronics Podcast
Contextual Electronics
CEP007 – Combining Art and Technology with Sarah Petkus
Sarah's personal site (shown throughout the video) She Bon is a project exploring human sexuality and helping people discuss it in a more healthy way. It has multiple smaller projects we discussed HotSpot PulsePack Sarah shows the hardware to different groups. The hackers at DEFCON are different than the artists at Ars Electronica Sarah entered the project into the Hackaday Prize and also gave a talk at the Hackaday Superconference about it. Comparing artists and jackets, the former usually want to show completely finished work, instead of something that might be in progress. This means artist sometimes outsource the technical work. Sarah likes doing both. "You learn the most when you do it all, when you have the control" Howdo we get more art people to be technical? How do we get more crossover? "I made this!" Noodlefeet is Sarah's robotic offspring. she has been creating an upgrading him for over 5 years. The Noodlefeet playlist on Sarah's Youtube channel Rebuilding Noodle to make him more sturdy, especially while walking. Ship of Theseus The Noodle brain uses a Jetson Nano for classifying images. See the 'mother of machine' site for more info. End Effectors "The tasting channel" Sarah got started in 3D using SketchUp, as did Chris. She learned parametric modeling via Fusion360 went on a deadline. Sarah and Mark met at SynShop Follow Sarah on YouTube Sarah shares her regular sketches and thoughts on Twitter Sarah also has a patreon Thank you for supporting The Contextual Electronics Podcast! Here's how you can follow and help us grow: Please follow us on social media: @ContextualElec on Twitter Contextual Electronics on Facebook Contextual Electronics on LinkedIn @Chris_Gammell on Twitter Please consider leaving us a review iTunes page for subscribing and reviewing Video version of the podcast: Audio version of the podcast:
1 hr 13 min
Hacker Public Radio
Hacker Public Radio
Hacker Public Radio
HPR3192: A light bulb moment, part 3
_LED History_ The history of the LED revolution is both long and complex but I'll do my best to cover it. Please forgive me if I mispronounce some of the materials and processes I'm not a lighting expert as I stated right back at the beginning of this series. The following excerpts are from Wikipedia; the link will be in the show notes, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-emitting_diode The LED or Light Emitting Diode first appeared as a practical electronic component in 1962, the earliest LEDs emitted low-intensity infrared light.[7] Infrared LEDs are used in remote-control circuits, such as those used with a wide variety of consumer electronics. The first visible-light LEDs were of low intensity and limited to red. Modern LEDs are available across the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared wavelengths, with high light output. A great deal of development and refinement was required to get to this point. The first commercial visible-wavelength LEDs were commonly used as replacements for incandescent and neon indicator lamps, and in seven-segment displays,[31] first in expensive equipment such as laboratory and electronics test equipment, then later in such appliances as calculators, TVs, radios, telephones, as well as watches (see list of signal uses). Until 1968, visible and infrared LEDs were extremely costly, in the order of US$200 per unit, and so had little practical use.[32] In 1968 Monsanto was the first organization to mass-produce visible LEDs, these were red LEDs suitable for indicators.[32] In February 1969, Hewlett-Packard introduced the HP Model 5082-7000 Numeric Indicator, the first LED device to use integrated circuit (integrated LED circuit) technology.[33] It was the first intelligent LED display, and was a revolution in digital display technology, replacing the Nixie tube and becoming the basis for later LED displays.[36] The early red LEDs were bright enough only for use as indicators, as the light output was not enough to illuminate an area. Readouts in calculators were so small that plastic lenses were built over each digit to make them legible. Later, other colors became widely available and appeared in appliances and equipment. The first blue-violet LED using magnesium-doped gallium nitride was made at Stanford University in 1972 by Herb Maruska and Wally Rhines In 1973 Pankove and Ed Miller demonstrated the first blue electroluminescence from zinc-doped gallium nitride, though the subsequent device Pankove and Miller built, the first actual gallium nitride light-emitting diode, emitted green light.[49][50] Today, magnesium-doping of gallium nitride remains the basis for all commercial blue LEDs and laser diodes. In the early 1970s, these devices were too dim for practical use, and research into gallium nitride devices slowed. In 1993, high-brightness blue LEDs were demonstrated by Shuji Nakamura of Nichia Corporation using a gallium nitride growth process.[56][57][58] In parallel, Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano in Nagoya were working on developing the important GaN deposition on sapphire substrates and the demonstration of p-type doping of GaN. This new development revolutionized LED lighting, making high-power blue light sources practical, leading to the development of technologies like Blu-ray[citation needed]. In 1995, Alberto Barbieri at the Cardiff University Laboratory (GB) investigated the efficiency and reliability of high-brightness LEDs and demonstrated a "transparent contact" LED using indium tin oxide (ITO) on (AlGaInP/GaAs). In 2001[62] and 2002,[63] processes for growing gallium nitride (GaN) LEDs on silicon were successfully demonstrated. In January 2012, Osram demonstrated high-power InGaN LEDs grown on silicon substrates commercially,[64] and GaN-on-silicon LEDs are in production at Plessey Semiconductors. _White LEDs and the illumination breakthrough_ Even though white light can be created using individual red, green and blue LEDs, this results in poor color rendering, since only three narrow bands of wavelengths of light are being emitted. The attainment of high efficiency blue LEDs was quickly followed by the development of the first white LED. In this device a cerium doped phosphor coating produces yellow light through fluorescence. The combination of that yellow with remaining blue light appears white to the eye. Using different phosphors produces green and red light through fluorescence. The resulting mixture of red, green and blue is perceived as white light, with improved color rendering compared to wavelengths from the blue LED/YAG phosphor combination. The first white LEDs were expensive and inefficient. However, the light output of LEDs has increased exponentially. The latest research and development has been propagated by Japanese manufacturers such as Panasonic, and Nichia, and by Korean and Chinese manufacturers such as Samsung, Kingsun, and others. This trend in increased output has been called Haitz's law after Dr. Roland Haitz.[79] Figure 1 Illustration of Haitz's law, showing improvement in light output per LED over time, with a logarithmic scale on the vertical axis Light output and efficiency of blue and near-ultraviolet LEDs rose and the cost of reliable devices fell. This led to relatively high-power white-light LEDs for illumination, which are replacing incandescent and fluorescent lighting.[80][81] Experimental white LEDs have been demonstrated to produce 303 lumens per watt of electricity (lm/w); some can last up to 100,000 hours.[82][83] However, commercially available LEDs have an efficiency of up to 223 lm/w.[84][85][86] Below are some comparisons for incandescent bulbs _Some figures I found online from Wikipedia_ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incandescent_light_bulb (Example figure for Standard Incandescent bulb only 12.6 lm / W) (Example figures for Halogen bulb being 24 lm / W) With LEDs continuing to get cheaper and even though for now they cost more than traditional bulbs, having this huge increase in electrical efficiency means the overall cost is significantly cheaper than that of incandescent bulbs.[87] While indicator LEDs are known for their extremely long life, up to 100,000 hours, lighting LEDs are operated much less conservatively, and consequently have shorter lives. LED technology is useful for lighting designers, because of its low power consumption, low heat generation, instantaneous on/off control, and in the case of single color LEDs, continuity of color throughout the life of the diode and relatively low cost of manufacture. LED lifetime depends strongly on the temperature of the diode. Operating an LED lamp in conditions that increase the internal temperature can greatly shorten the lamp's life. I now use LED lighting in my own home particularly in the areas where lighting is on for extended periods such as in the living room. As you can see we have come an extremely long way in a relatively short space of time with advancements continuing to accelerate. It's hard to appreciate the massive impact electric lighting has had on the world. It's even harder to imagine living in a time not that long ago where an expensive candle producing a puny amount illumination was the only source of light, with the added not inconsiderable fire risk of having a naked flame sharing a room with combustible materials. With all these deterrents it's little wonder that people just went to bed when the sun went down.
The Social-Engineer Podcast
The Social-Engineer Podcast
Social-Engineer, LLC
Ep. 134 – Altered Memories and Alternate Realities with Dr. Elizabeth Loftus
In this episode, Chris Hadnagy and Ryan MacDougall are joined by distinguished professor: Elizabeth Loftus. Listen in to understand the vulnerabilities in human memories and how they are sometimes exploited. Learn to defend against attacks on your memory and how this info can be applied in the information security industry. 00:01 – Introduction to Elizabeth Loftus and her research on the malleability of human memory. 01:41 – Elizabeth's reasoning for researching human memory. 03:12 – What our faulty memory means for eyewitness testimonies. 04:20 – How the phrasing of a question can distort someone's memory. 06:27 – Is it possible to verify the accuracy of a memory? 10:34 – Trying hard to remember something can sometimes lead to the creation of a false memory. 11:22 – Elizabeth's experience with the trial of George Franklin. 14:13 – How can we protect ourselves from having our memories modified? 14:21 – The similarities between preventing false memories and preventing scams. 20:40 – “What the heck is going on in the world of Social-Engineer: COVID Style.” Practical Open Source Intelligence For Everyday Social Engineers * 11-12 November 2020 - VIRTUAL Advanced Practical Social Engineering Training * 17-20 November, 2020 - VIRTUAL The Human Hacking Conference - Orlando, FL March 11-13, 2021 2021 Training Schedule Book: Human Hacking: Win Friends, Influence People, and Leave Them Better Off for Having Met You Website: social-engineer.com Website: social-engineer.org 25:43 – How hypnosis therapy often generates false memories. 30:21 – How to protect yourself from having your memories altered. 32:58 – The prevalence and impact of misinformation on social media. 38:30 – Elizabeth’s website, Ted Talk and books. Elizabeth F. Loftus’ UCI School of Social Ecology Website Ted Talk at TedGlobal 2013 Books by Elizabeth 39:44 – Elizabeth’s book recommendations. Mistakes Were Made (but Not by Me) 41:50 – Outro Social-Engineer.org Newsletter Framework Blog Social-Engineer.com The Innocent Lives Foundation The Innocent Lives Foundation on Twitter The Human Hacking Conference The Human Hacking Conference on Twitter Human Hacking Book Chris on Twitter Social-Engineer on Twitter Social-Engineer on Facebook Social-Engineer on LinkedIn Social-Engineer on Instagram Social-Engineer on Slack
46 min
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