Yoshua Bengio: Deep Learning
Play episode · 43 min
Yoshua Bengio, along with Geoffrey Hinton and Yann Lecun, is considered one of the three people most responsible for the advancement of deep learning during the 1990s, 2000s, and now. Cited 139,000 times, he has been integral to some of the biggest breakthroughs in AI over the past 3 decades. Video version is available on YouTube. If you would like to get more information about this podcast go to https://lexfridman.com/ai or connect with @lexfridman on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, or YouTube where you can watch the video versions of these conversations.
The Portal
The Portal
Eric Weinstein
40: Introducing The Portal Essay Club - What if everyone is simply insane?
If you have ever wondered whether you were crazy when everyone else claims to see things differently than you do, this is the episode for you. Book clubs are everywhere and we are always asked for book recommendations. But what about the great Essays, Interviews, Conversations, Aphorisms, Shaggy Dog Stories, Lyrics, Courtroom Testimonies, Poems, Movie Scenes, Jokes and the like? Sadly, there is almost never a club in which to discuss them. Yet there are Essays and offerings in other intellectual formats that are just as profound and meaningful as any book while having the advantage of being much more in keeping with modern attention spans. The Portal seeks to fill this obvious lacuna.  We thus finish out the regular first year of the Portal Podcast with an inaugural episode of an experiment: The Portal Essay Club. In this episode Eric reads aloud an astonishing essay from 1944 by Arthur Koestler which changed his world. In the essay, Koestler wrestles with a difficult question that has plagued independent thinkers for ages: what if everyone who is supposedly 'normal' is actually a maniac living in a dream world? What if the only sane ones appear crazy just as the crazy appear sane?  During the episode, Eric first reads aloud the essay "The Nightmare That Is A Reality." and then discusses paragraph by paragraph what makes this one of the most profound yet often forgotten essays to have appeared within the twilight of living memory (1944 as it happens). We hope you will enjoy this experiment and let us know what you would like to see appear next in this series.  Thanks for a great first year.  Thank You From Our Sponsors Mack Weldon: For 20% off your first order visit www.mackweldon.com AND ENTER PROMO CODE: PORTAL ExpressVPN: Protect your online activity today at www.expressvpn.com/PORTAL and get an extra 3 months FREE on a one-year package. NetSuite: Receive your FREE guide – “Seven Actions Businesses Need to Take Now” and schedule your FREE Product Tour at www.netsuite.com/PORTAL Unagi Scooters: Get $150 off your own Unagi E500 electric scooter while supplies last at www.unagiscooters.com PROMO CODE PORTAL
1 hr 11 min
The Jordan Harbinger Show
The Jordan Harbinger Show
Jordan Harbinger
421: Sorting Out My Secret Lesbian Love Life | Feedback Friday
You're a mother of three, happily married to a wonderful man. But lately you've been acting on your urges to get intimate with other women. Racked with guilt, what can you do to come to terms with this secret lesbian love life before it wrecks your marriage? We'll tackle this and more here on Feedback Friday! And in case you didn't already know it, Jordan Harbinger (@JordanHarbinger) and Gabriel Mizrahi (@GabeMizrahi) banter and take your comments and questions for Feedback Friday right here every week! If you want us to answer your question, register your feedback, or tell your story on one of our upcoming weekly Feedback Friday episodes, drop us a line at friday@jordanharbinger.com. Now let's dive in! Full show notes and resources can be found here: jordanharbinger.com/421 On This Week's Feedback Friday, We Discuss: * What does it mean to live with a bias toward action? * You're a mother of three, happily married to a wonderful man. But lately, you've been acting on your urges to get intimate with other women. Racked with guilt, what can you do to come to terms with this secret lesbian love life before it wrecks your marriage? * How do you break out of the dead-end job rut? You're not looking for your dream job, and you're not looking to get rich. You just want to be content with your career and find financial stability, but it seems easier said than done. * Your father is a retired child psychologist who should know that treating you like a nuisance when you need good advice about raising your own child isn't doing your relationship any favors. Is there anything you can do to make him understand something that seems so obvious? * You've been doing the work of someone two levels above you in the company hierarchy, but you keep getting the brush off when you try to negotiate a raise and elevation in title. How do you more assertively pursue your due? * You try to maintain your adult friendships by reaching out and catching up whenever the opportunity arises, but you can't shake the feeling that you're always the one putting in effort that's not reciprocated. Are you crossing some invisible boundaries you're not aware of, or should you just keep on keeping on? * Have any questions, comments, or stories you'd like to share with us? Drop us a line at friday@jordanharbinger.com! * Connect with Jordan on Twitter at @JordanHarbinger and Instagram at @jordanharbinger. * Connect with Gabriel on Twitter at @GabeMizrahi. Sign up for Six-Minute Networking -- our free networking and relationship development mini course -- at jordanharbinger.com/course!
55 min
The Art of Manliness
The Art of Manliness
The Art of Manliness
#654: How to Astronaut
If you grew up in the ‘80s like me, there's a good chance you really wanted to go to space camp and you really wanted to be an astronaut. You probably had a lot of questions about what it was like to live in space, and if those questions were never answered (or you've forgotten the answers), my guest today can tell you everything you ever wanted to know. His name is Colonel Terry Virts and he's been to space twice, the second time serving as commander of the International Space Station for 200 days. Terry also helped film the IMAX movie A Beautiful Planet, and is the author of How to Astronaut: An Insider's Guide to Leaving Planet Earth. Terry and I begin our conversation with the plan he set in childhood to become an astronaut via going to the Air Force Academy and becoming a pilot. We talk about how long it took him to make it to space once he joined NASA, the training he underwent for years which required being a skill-acquiring polymath, and how aspects of that training, which included flying jets and wilderness survival courses, didn't always directly correlate to his job as an astronaut, but were still essential in being adept at it. We also discuss the physical training Terry did both before his missions and after leaving the earth, and whether he suffered any long-term health issues from being in space. From there we get into what a typical day is like when you're floating through sixteen sunsets, including what space food looks like these days and whether they’re really eating "astronaut ice cream" up there, what it's like to sleep while weightless, and of course, that most burning of questions, "How do you go the bathroom in space?" We then discuss the importance of emotional and mental skills when you're living for months at a time in a space station, and what it was like to leave that station to take a spacewalk and see the earth from above. We end our conversation with how Terry physically and psychologically adjusted to returning to earth, whether he yearns to go back up again, and what he thinks the future of space exploration holds. Consider this show the stint at space camp your parents never signed off on. Get the show notes at aom.is/astronaut. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
47 min
Conversations with Tyler
Conversations with Tyler
Mercatus Center at George Mason University
Michael Kremer on Economists as Founders
Michael Kremer is best known for his academic work researching global poverty, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2019 along with Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee. Less known is that he is also the founder of five non-profits and in the process of creating a sixth. And Kremer doesn’t see anything unusual about embodying the dual archetypes of economist and founder. “I think there's a lot of relationship between the experimental method and the things that are needed to help found organizations,” he explains. Michael joined Tyler to discuss the intellectual challenge of founding organizations, applying methods from behavioral economics to design better programs, how advanced market commitments could lower pharmaceutical costs for consumers while still incentivizing R&D, the ongoing cycle of experimentation every innovator understands, the political economy of public health initiatives, the importance of designing institutions to increase technological change, the production function of new technologies, incentivizing educational achievement, The Odyssey as a tale of comparative development, why he recently transitioned to University of Chicago, what researchers can learn from venture capitalists, his current work addressing COVID-19, and more. Follow us on Twitter and IG: @cowenconvos Email: cowenconvos@mercatus.gmu.edu Follow Tyler on Twitter Facebook Newsletter
50 min
The Vergecast
The Vergecast
The Verge
Quibi is shutting down / Google faces antitrust charges / Foxconn’s LCD factory is Wisconsin isn’t real
Dieter Bohn and Nilay Patel talk to Julia Alexander about Quibi shutting down, Adi Robertson about the US government filing antitrust charges against Google, and Josh Dzieza about his report on Wisconsin's empty Foxconn factory. Stories from this week: The ambitious effort to piece together America’s fragmented health data  Microsoft wants to cut down pollution from its business travel   Is Quibi done for? Quibi is shutting down 11 reasons why Quibi crashed and burned in less than a year Quibi’s top executives are ready to blame themselves, not just the pandemic, for Quibi failing Watch AOC play Among Us live on Twitch with HasanAbi and Pokimane The US government has filed antitrust charges against Google Who is Google’s market power hurting? Senate committee approves subpoenas for Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey How to retweet using Twitter’s new temporary format Republican lawmakers are furious after Twitter asks users to read stories before retweeting Facebook’s independent oversight board is now accepting cases The 8th Wonder of the World Exclusive: Wisconsin report confirms Foxconn’s so-called LCD factory isn’t real Apple iPad Air (2020) review: take it from the Pro Amazon Echo (2020) review: music of the sphere Beats Flex review: wireless earbud basics done right Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 26 min
The Tim Ferriss Show
The Tim Ferriss Show
Tim Ferriss: Bestselling Author, Human Guinea Pig
#475: Mr. Money Mustache — Living Beautifully on $25-27K Per Year (Repost)
Mr. Money Mustache — Living Beautifully on $25-27K Per Year (Repost)| Brought to you by Athletic Greens, 99designs, and The Ready State Mr. Money Mustache (@mrmoneymustache — Pete Adeney in real life) grew up in Canada in a family of mostly eccentric musicians. He graduated with a degree in computer engineering in the 1990s and worked in various tech companies before retiring at age 30. Pete, his wife, and their now eleven-year-old son live near Boulder, Colorado, and have not had real jobs since 2005. This begs the question of “How?” In essence, they accomplished this early retirement by optimizing all aspects of their lifestyle for maximal fun at minimal expense, and by using basic index-fund investing. Their average annual expenses total a mere $25-27,000, and they do not feel in want of anything. Since 2005, all three of them have explored a free-form life of interesting projects, side-businesses, and adventures. In 2011, Pete started writing the Mr. Money Mustache blog about his philosophy, which has grown to reach about 23 million different people (and 300 million page views) since its founding. It has become a worldwide cult phenomenon, with a self-organizing community and incredible news coverage. This episode explores his story, philosophies, and routines. Please enjoy! This episode originally aired in 2017. You can find the show notes here: https://tim.blog/2017/02/13/mr-money-mustache/ This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens. I get asked all the time, “If you could only use one supplement, what would it be?” My answer is usually Athletic Greens, my all-in-one nutritional insurance. I recommended it in The 4-Hour Body in 2010 and did not get paid to do so. I do my best with nutrient-dense meals, of course, but AG further covers my bases with vitamins, minerals, and whole-food-sourced micronutrients that support gut health and the immune system.  Right now, Athletic Greens is offering you their Vitamin D Liquid Formula free with your first subscription purchase—a vital nutrient for a strong immune system and strong bones. Visit AthleticGreens.com/Tim to claim this special offer today and receive the free Vitamin D Liquid Formula with your first subscription purchase! That’s up to a one-year supply of Vitamin D as added value when you try their delicious and comprehensive all-in-one daily greens product. * This podcast is also brought to you by 99designs, the global creative platform that makes it easy for designers and clients to work together to create designs they love. Its creative process has become the go-to solution for businesses, agencies, and individuals, and I have used it for years to help with display advertising and illustrations and to rapid prototype the cover for The Tao of Seneca. Whether your business needs a logo, website design, business card, or anything you can imagine, check out 99designs. You can work with multiple designers at once to get a bunch of different ideas, or hire the perfect designer for your project based on their style and industry specialization. It’s simple to review concepts and leave feedback so you’ll end up with a design that you’re happy with. Click this link and get $20 off plus a $99 upgrade. * This podcast is also brought to you by The Ready State Virtual Mobility Coach. The first person I call for help with my athletic recovery or mobility training is Dr. Kelly Starrett at The Ready State. Kelly is a mobility and movement coach for Olympic gold medalists, world champions, and pro athletes. Kelly created a program called Virtual Mobility Coach. It’s like carrying a virtual Kelly Starrett in your pocket. Every day, Virtual Mobility Coach gives you guided mobility videos. It walks you step-by-step through Kelly’s proven techniques to relieve pain and improve your range of motion. Right now, listeners of this podcast can try Virtual Mobility Coach totally risk-free for two weeks without paying a penny. And after that, you can get 10% off for life. Just go to TheReadyState.com/Tim and use code TIM10 at checkout. Relieve pain, recover faster, and improve your performance in the gym with The Ready State Virtual Mobility Coach. Visit TheReadyState.com/Tim and check it out. *** If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews! For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast. Sign up for Tim’s email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday. For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts. Discover Tim’s books: tim.blog/books. Follow Tim: Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss  Instagram: instagram.com/timferriss Facebook: facebook.com/timferriss  YouTube: youtube.com/timferriss
1 hr 54 min
Science Salon
Science Salon
Michael Shermer
139. Shelby Steele — Shame: How America’s Past Sins Have Polarized Our Country & the film What Killed Michael Brown?
The United States today is hopelessly polarized; the political Right and Left have hardened into rigid and deeply antagonistic camps, preventing any sort of progress. Amid the bickering and inertia, the promise of the 1960s—when we came together as a nation to fight for equality and universal justice—remains unfulfilled. As Shelby Steele reveals in Shame, the roots of this impasse can be traced back to that decade of protest, when in the act of uncovering and dismantling our national hypocrisies—racism, sexism, militarism—liberals internalized the idea that there was something inauthentic, if not evil, in the America character. Since then, liberalism has been wholly concerned with redeeming modern America from the sins of the past, and has derived its political legitimacy from the premise of a morally bankrupt America. The result has been a half-century of well-intentioned but ineffective social programs, such as Affirmative Action. Steele reveals that not only have these programs failed, but they have in almost every case actively harmed America’s minorities and poor. Ultimately, Steele argues, post-60s liberalism has utterly failed to achieve its stated aim: true equality. Liberals, intending to atone for our past sins, have ironically perpetuated the exploitation of this country’s least fortunate citizens. Approaching political polarization from a wholly new perspective, Steele offers a rigorous critique of the failures of liberalism and a cogent argument for the relevance and power of conservatism. Shermer and Steele discuss: * 30th anniversary of his book The Content of Our Character, and what has changed in race relations in America in those 30 years? * Steele’s response to President Johnson’s famous quote: “Freedom is not enough. You do not take a person who, for years, has been hobbled by chains and liberate him; bring him up to the starting line of a race and then say, ‘you are free to compete with all the others,’ and still justly believe that you have been completely fair.” * why “The promised land guarantees nothing. It is only an opportunity, not a deliverance.”, * literal truths vs. poetic truths and power: “What actually happened was that liberalism turned to poetic truth when America’s past sins were no longer literally true enough to support liberal policies and the liberal claim on power. The poetic truth of black victimization seeks to compensate for America’s moral evolution. It tries to keep alive the justification for liberal power even as that justification has been greatly nullified by America’s moral development.” * political correctness is the enforcement arm of poetic truth, * black families & fatherless homes, * white guilt, * race fatigue, * reparations, * anti-racism, * achievement gap, * Princeton racism letter, * race and IQ, * SAT tests, * BLM and the nuclear family, * training and sensitivity programs. Shermer and Steele also discuss his new film, produced with his son Eli Steele, titled What Killed Michael Brown? Steele: “We human beings never use race except as a means to power. Race is never an end. It is always a means, and it has no role in human affairs except as a corruption.” “America’s original sin is not slavery. It is simply the use of race as a means to power. Whether for good or ill, race is a corruption. Always. And it always turns one group into the convenience of another group.” “Liberalism’s great sin was to steal responsibility for black problems away from black people, leaving them vulnerable to destructive social forces, such as the drug epidemic of the 70s and 80s. It was the suffering of blacks that justified liberalism’s demand for power, but this only relegates blacks to permanent victimhood and alienates them from the power to uplift themselves.” Shelby Steele is the Robert J. and Marion E. Oster Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. Winner of the Bradley Prize and a National Humanities Medal and the author of the National Book Critics Circle award-winning The Content of Our Character, Steele lives in the Central Coast of California.
1 hr 38 min
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