#131 – Chris Lattner: The Future of Computing and Programming Languages
2 hr 48 min
Chris Lattner is a world-class software & hardware engineer, leading projects at Apple, Tesla, Google, and SiFive. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – Blinkist: https://blinkist.com/lex and use code LEX to get a free week of premium – Neuro: https://www.getneuro.com and use code LEX to get 15% off – MasterClass: https://masterclass.com/lex to get 15% off annual sub – Cash App: https://cash.app/ and use code LexPodcast to get $10 EPISODE LINKS: Chris’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/clattner_llvm Chris’s Website: http://nondot.org/sabre/ PODCAST INFO: Podcast website: https://lexfridman.com/podcast Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lwqZIr Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2nEwCF8 RSS: https://lexfridman.com/feed/podcast/ YouTube Full Episodes: https://youtube.com/lexfridman YouTube Clips: https://youtube.com/lexclips SUPPORT &
The Peter Attia Drive
The Peter Attia Drive
Peter Attia, MD
#139 - Kristin Neff, Ph.D.: The power of self-compassion
Kristin Neff is a Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas, author, and a leading expert on mindful self-compassion. In this episode, she shares how developing a self-compassion and mindfulness practice was the most effective tool for relieving her own suffering, and provides strategies and tactics to improve self-compassion and well-being. We discuss: * The life crisis that turned Kristin to mindfulness and self-compassion (3:30); * How mindful self-compassion relieved Kristin’s feelings of self-judgement, and the psychology that says we all have the capacity for self-compassion (9:45); * Peter’s history of self-criticism and his personal practice of self-compassion (17:15); * The problem with prioritizing self-esteem over self-compassion, and how self-compassion produces a more stable version of self-worth (20:15); * An argument for self-compassion over self-criticism for optimizing performance (26:15); * How and when to introduce self-compassion to children (31:45); * Learning her son had autism—a personal story of how Kristin used mindfulness and self-compassion (36:45); * Self-compassion for cases of childhood trauma, PTSD, and overcoming a “fear of compassion” (44:00); * The relationship between self-compassion and physical health (49:30); * Distinguishing between self-compassion and self-pity, and the three necessary components self-compassion (52:30); * Why self-criticism comes from a desire to be safe, the circular pattern of self-judgment, and self-compassion as the ultimate motivator (55:45); * Potential role of a self-compassion practice for addiction and other maladaptive behaviors (58:45); * Clinical applications and practical uses of self-compassion (1:01:30); * Why you don’t need to meditate to learn mindfulness and self-compassion (1:04:45); * Kristin’s personal meditation practice (1:08:40); * Resources for learning self-compassion (1:11:45); and * More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/kristinneff Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on _Faceboo__k_ | _Twitter_ | _Instagram_.
1 hr 17 min
The Art of Manliness
The Art of Manliness
The Art of Manliness
#665: How Childhood Shapes Adulthood
Ask an adult, especially if they're struggling in life, what caused them to end up the way they did, and they might cite certain factors from their childhood, like having a mother that was too cold. The problem here, of course, is that memories change over time, and narratives about the past develop to fit one's current situation. My guests today work on the kind of research that corrects this problem to figure out how aspects of childhood truly affect adulthood, by studying humans from the time they're babies through middle age and beyond. Their names are Jay Belsky and Terrie Moffitt, and they're professors of human development, and two of the four contributors to The Origins of You: How Childhood Shapes Later Life. To begin our conversation, Jay and Terrie discuss the longitudinal studies they and their colleagues have used to track people over decades of their lives, and how aggressiveness and shyness in childhood end up impacting adulthood. We then discuss the limitations of the famous marshmallow experiment, and what these more expansive longitudinal studies have shown about the importance of self-control in achieving a successful adulthood. We unpack whether the negative outcomes associated with being bullied in childhood are inevitable, who's most likely to become a bully, and who's most likely to be bullied (which as it turns out, isn't a matter of being fat or wearing glasses). We discuss how children who act out in childhood, but avoid making certain mistakes in adolescence, can still turn out okay, and why you probably shouldn't worry about children who were good kids, but get into a little trouble in their teen years. We also dig into the impact that childcare has on kids, and the role that genes play in development. We end our conversation with some allowance-related ideas for cultivating greater self-control in your kids.  Get the show notes at aom.is/childhood. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
55 min
Policy, Guns & Money
Policy, Guns & Money
The Australian Strategic Policy Institute
Australian special forces inquiry, climate in the Pacific and women, peace and security
In this episode of Policy, Guns & Money, Brendan Nicholson speaks to Samantha Crompvoets, founder and director at Rapid Context who carried out the review of special forces which uncovered claims that war crimes were committed by Australian special forces in Afghanistan. They discuss the Brereton Report, how a dangerous ‘warrior culture’ developed unchecked, and what needs to be done to stop it happening again. Anastasia Kapetas speaks with Ben Bohane, Communications Director at ANU’s Australia Pacific Security College and Pacific specialist, about climate initiatives and innovation in the Pacific, and disaster responses and resilience. They also discuss the regional response to Joe Biden’s election and the prospects for the US to return to a global leadership role on tackling climate change. Genevieve Feely speaks to Rachel Grimes, NATO ACT Liaison Officer to the UN, ICRC and NGOs, about her experiences working in the UN, NATO and UK Defence. They discuss the importance of terminology, the progress made so far in the increasing female representation in peacekeeping operations and the prospects for advancing the women, peace and security agenda. The views expressed in this interview are Rachel’s personal views. Mentioned in this episode: https://afghanistaninquiry.defence.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-11/IGADF-Afghanistan-Inquiry-Public-Release-Version.pdf Guests: Brendan Nicholson: https://www.aspi.org.au/bio/brendan-nicholson Samantha Crompvoets: https://www.rapidcontext.com.au/samantha-crompvoets Anastasia Kapetas: https://www.aspi.org.au/bio/anastasia-kapetas Ben Bohane: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/people/professional/ben-bohane Genevieve Feely: https://www.aspi.org.au/bio/genevieve-feely Rachel Grimes MBE: https://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/people/Rachel-Grimes Music: "Drop" by 'Anno Domini Beats' - via the YouTube Audio Library Image: piqsels.com
49 min
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