#139 – Andrew Huberman: Neuroscience of Optimal Performance
Play • 2 hr 36 min
Andrew Huberman is a neuroscientist at Stanford. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – Eight Sleep: https://www.eightsleep.com/lex and use code LEX to get $200 off – SEMrush: https://www.semrush.com/partner/lex/ to get a free month of Guru – Cash App: https://cash.app/ and use code LexPodcast to get $10 EPISODE LINKS: Andrew’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab Andrew’s Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_D._Huberman Andrew’s Website: http://www.hubermanlab.com/ PODCAST INFO: Podcast website: https://lexfridman.com/podcast Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lwqZIr Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2nEwCF8 RSS: https://lexfridman.com/feed/podcast/ YouTube Full Episodes: https://youtube.com/lexfridman YouTube Clips: https://youtube.com/lexclips SUPPORT & CONNECT: – Check out the sponsors above, it’s the best way to support this podcast – Support on Patreon:
Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
Sean Carroll | Wondery
131 | Avi Loeb on Taking Aliens Seriously
The possible existence of technologically advanced extraterrestrial civilizations — not just alien microbes, but cultures as advanced (or much more) than our own — is one of the most provocative questions in modern science. So provocative that it’s difficult to talk about the idea in a rational, dispassionate way; there are those who loudly insist that the probability of advanced alien cultures existing is essentially one, even without direct evidence, and others are so exhausted by overblown claims in popular media that they want to squelch any such talk. Astronomer Avi Loeb thinks we should be taking this possibility seriously, so much so that he suggested that the recent interstellar interloper `Oumuamua might be a spaceship built by aliens. That got him in a lot of trouble. We talk about the trouble, about `Oumuamua, and the attitude scientists should take toward provocative ideas. Support Mindscape on Patreon. Abraham (Avi) Loeb received his Ph.D. in plasma physics from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is currently the Frank B. Baird Jr. professor of science at Harvard University. He served as the Chair of Harvard’s Astronomy department from 2011-2020. He is Director of the Institute for Theory and Computation of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and Founding Director of Harvard’s Black Hole Initiative. He is chair of the Advisory Committee for the Breakthrough Starshot Initiative. His new book is Extraterrestrial: The First Sign of Intelligent Life Beyond Earth. * Harvard Astronomy web page * Center for Astrophysics web page * Wikipedia
1 hr 41 min
Bret Weinstein | DarkHorse Podcast
Bret Weinstein | DarkHorse Podcast
Bret Weinstein & Heather Heying
#64: The Data Are Going to be Phenomenal! (Bret Weinstein & Heather Heying DarkHorse Livestream)
In this 64th in a series of live discussions with Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying (both PhDs in Biology), we discuss the state of the world through an evolutionary lens. In this episode, we begin by discussing some of the Biden administration’s early policy decisions: shutting down DAPL, rejoining the Paris Agreement on Climate, and affirming the rights of trans people (and in so doing putting the rights of women at risk). Rolling Stone (the magazine) jumps the shark (but is it a literal or a metaphorical shark?). We discuss how to survive a year of lockdowns if you’re a small business, calling on two anecdotes from Portland. We discuss what is happening at Powell’s, Portland’s massive, independent bookstore, and ask what it says about “mostly peaceful” protests. Tech censorship is continuing apace, with the removal of Game-B architects from Facebook. And a doctor advises us to “trust the science,” saying that “the data is phenomenal!”  DarkHorse merchandise now available at: store.darkhorsepodcast.org  Find more from us on Bret’s website (https://bretweinstein.net) or Heather’s website (http://heatherheying.com).  Become a member of the DarkHorse LiveStreams, and get access to an additional Q&A livestream every month. Join at Heather's Patreon.  Like this content? Subscribe to the channel, like this video, follow us on twitter (@BretWeinstein, @HeatherEHeying), and consider helping us out by contributing to either of our Patreons or Bret’s Paypal.  Looking for clips from #DarkHorseLivestreams? Here are some, updated frequently: @DarkHorse Podcast Clips  Theme Music: Thank you to Martin Molin of Wintergatan for providing us the rights to use their excellent music.  Q&A Link: https://youtu.be/YTNEcQHIHV4  Mentioned in this episode:  Executive Order from January 20, 2021, on Preventing and Combating Discrimination on the Basis of Gender Identity or Sexual Orientation: https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2021/01/20/executive-order-preventing-and-combating-discrimination-on-basis-of-gender-identity-or-sexual-orientation/  Washington Post article from January 19, 2021, “Biden selects transgender doctor Rachel Levine as assistant health secretary”: https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2021/01/19/rachel-levine-transgender-biden-hhs-pick/  Washington Post article from June 1, 2016, “Meet Rachel Levine, one of the very few transgender public officials in America”: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/meet-rachel-levine-one-of-the-very-few-transgender-public-officials-in-america/2016/06/01/cf6e2332-2415-11e6-8690-f14ca9de2972_story.html?itid=lk_interstitial_manual_10  Rolling Stone jumps the shark (“Rolling Stone seeks 'thought leaders' willing to pay $2,000 to write for them”) https://www.theguardian.com/media/2021/jan/23/rolling-stone-magazine-culture-council-publication  “Vaccine Voices” from the January 21, 2021 newsletter from the Oregon Health Authority’s Coronavirus Update: https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/ORDHS/bulletins/2baa334  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bretweinstein)
1 hr 30 min
The Art of Manliness
The Art of Manliness
The Art of Manliness
The History of Fame, From Alexander the Great to Social Media Influencers
When choosing among options like becoming a leader, helping others, and becoming more spiritual, half of millennials say that their generation's first or second most important goal is being famous. When teenagers in the UK were asked what they'd like to do for their career, over half said they wanted to be a celebrity. And amongst kids polled in the US and UK, 3X more said they'd like to become a YouTube star than an astronaut.  How did fame, and modernity's particular flavor of fame, rise to such prominence? Has fame always been attractive, and how has its meaning changed over time? My guest answers these questions in his book, The Frenzy of Renown: Fame and Its History. His name is Leo Braudy, and he's a professor of English literature, film history and criticism, and American culture at USC. Today on the show, Leo takes us on a wide-ranging tour through the history of fame, which he describes as an emotion, an ambition to be somebody, to be known, the shape of which changes depending on the audience to which people look in order to gain the desired attention. We begin, and Leo will explain why, with Alexander the Great, before turning to what fame meant for the Romans, whose audience was not just the public, but their posterity. We then turn to how Christianity changed the idea of fame to something based on private, inward virtue, where one's only true audience was God. We then dig into how the Renaissance gave birth to the idea of the artist, who, regardless of social class, could gain fame through his talent and creativity. We discuss how the rise of mass media created a new kind of ever more democratized fame, and a dynamic which would come to rest on a reciprocal relationship between the famous and their fans. Leo argues that fame in the 20th century became more about being rather than doing, a trend which has only accelerated in the age of social media. At the end of our conversation, Leo makes the case for a return to a positive, ennobling conception of fame, in which recognition must be earned and connected to actual greatness. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
51 min
A Millennial's Guide to Saving the World
A Millennial's Guide to Saving the World
Anya Kaats
#77 Why Food May Not Be Thy Medicine with Dana Monsees
Dana is a Nutritionist and Body Image Coach who teaches women how to heal their relationship to food and to their bodies. She's also one of the very few people I actually trust in the wellness/functional medicine community. We speak about our personal health journeys, how we met in the food blogger world, and where we are now. We talk about the shadow sides of "wellness" culture as a whole, but specifically related to the paleo/ancestral/whole food world, & elaborate on how "functional," whole food diets are still diets. We also talk about the correlations between stress & health, how food and wellness influencers are rarely healthy and how the unhealthy relationship we have to food and to our bodies may very well be an extension of our unhealthy relationship to control. Find Dana at realfoodwithdana.com and on Instagram. Dana's book recommendations: Daring Greatly by Brené Brown, The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho, and Beyond Beautiful by Anuschka Rees Songs featured: "This is How We Walk on the Moon" by José González and "I Like That" by Janelle Monáe Interested in participating in the Lunar Circle? Visit anyakaats.com/lunarcircle for more information and to enroll. How to support the show: Rate, review and subscribe to the podcast on iTunes! Support my work on Patreon and get access to perks like exclusive WhatsApp group chats, a book club just for patrons, shirts + stickers, playlists, and curated workshops led by Patrons and former guests of the podcast. Visit my website - AnyaKaats.com & Find me on Instagram
1 hr 58 min
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