#123 – Manolis Kellis: Origin of Life, Humans, Ideas, Suffering, and Happiness
Play episode · 2 hr 11 min

Manolis Kellis is a professor at MIT and head of the MIT Computational Biology Group.

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Here’s the outline of the episode. On some podcast players you should be able to click the timestamp to jump to that time.

OUTLINE:
00:00 – Introduction
06:20 – Epigenome
10:28 – Evolution
15:26 – Neanderthals
27:15 – Origin of life on Earth
43:44 – Life is a fight against physics
49:56 – Life as a set of transformations
51:35 – Time scales
1:00:31 – Transformations of ideas in human civilization
1:05:19 – Life is more than a rat race
1:13:18 – Life sucks sometimes and that’s okay
1:30:16 – Getting older
1:36:21 – The best of MIT
1:49:01 – Poem 1: The Snow
2:01:52 – Love
2:06:16 – Poem 2: The Tide Waters

Bret Weinstein | DarkHorse Podcast
Bret Weinstein | DarkHorse Podcast
Bret Weinstein
#51: Facebook, Twitter, & Evolving Door Politics (Bret Weinstein & Heather Heying DarkHorse Livestream)
In this 51st in a series of live discussions with Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying (both PhDs in Biology), we discuss Bret’s recent Facebook ban. What are the implications for democracy when social media platforms are in the business of deciding who gets to speak? In the second half, we discuss Eric Hoffer’s 1951 book, The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements. Are there two mass movements currently competing with one another for adherents? Can creativity provide people with the power to resist such movements? What might good leadership look like? Find more from us on Bret’s website (https://bretweinstein.net) or Heather’s website (http://heatherheying.com). Become a member of the DarkHorse LiveStreams, and get access to an additional Q&A livestream every month. Join at Heather's Patreon.  Like this content? Subscribe to the channel, like this video, follow us on twitter (@BretWeinstein, @HeatherEHeying), and consider helping us out by contributing to either of our Patreons or Bret’s Paypal.  Looking for clips from #DarkHorseLivestreams? Here are some, updated frequently: @DarkHorse Podcast Clips  Theme Music: Thank you to Martin Molin of Wintergatan for providing us the rights to use their excellent music.  Q&A Link: https://youtu.be/YZaFb0c4YbE  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bretweinstein)
1 hr 38 min
The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma
The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma
Amit Varma
Ep 196: The Importance of Data Journalism
Good data journalism can reveal otherwise unseen truths about our society. Pioneering journalist Rukmini S joins Amit Varma in episode 196 of The Seen and the Unseen to talk about the insights data brought to her journalism, and her groundbreaking podcast on Covid-19, The Moving Curve. Also check out: 1. The Moving Curve -- Rukmini S's podcast, also on all podcast apps. 2. Rukmini S at HuffPost, Hindu, Scroll, Mint,Times of India (1, 2) and India Spend. 3. Canary -- Amy Brittain's podcast. 4. How the Coronavirus Could Take Over Your Body (Before You Ever Feel It) -- Jeff Wise. (This is the piece mistakenly referred to in this episode as an Atlantic article.) 5. Muslim Population Growth Slows -- Rukmini S & Vijaita Singh (2015). 6. The Art of Narrative Nonfiction -- Episode 183 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Samanth Subramanian). 7. Raag Darbari (Hindi) (English) -- Shrilal Shukla 8. Memories and Things -- Episode 195 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Aanchal Malhotra). 9. India’s coronavirus lockdown takes toll on migrant workers -- Rukmini S. 10. The First 100 -- The ProPublica investigation in Chicago. 11. Ideology and Identity -- Pradeep K Chhibber and Rahul Verma. 12. Political Ideology in India -- Episode 131 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Rahul Verma). 13. Somesh Jha at Business Standard. 14. Covid19india.org. 15. Taking Stock of Covid-19 -- Episode 169 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Shruti Rajagopalan). 16. The Nuances of Lockdown -- Episode 176 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Anup Malani). 17. India’s Economy in the Time of Covid-19 -- Episode 177 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Vivek Kaul). 18. Our Cities After Covid-19 -- Episode 191 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Vaidehi Tandel). 19. Data Journalism and Indian Politics -- Episode 136 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Roshan Kishore). 20. The State of the Media -- Episode 46 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Prem Panicker). 21. The State of the Media 2 -- Episode 89 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Sidharth Bhatia & Peter Griffin). 22. What Happened to Our Journalism? -- Episode 178 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Nidhi Razdan). And do check out Amit’s online course, The Art of Clear Writing.
2 hr 39 min
Econ Central
Econ Central
Amit Varma and Vivek Kaul
Ep 15: Goodbye and All That
Sad news, folks: this is it for Econ Central. Amit Varma and Vivek Kaul explain why they are ending this show at just episode 15 -- and also recommend a whole bunch of books to read as a goodbye gift. Also check out: 1. Moonflower Murders -- Anthony Horowitz. 2. The Paper Menagerie -- Ken Liu. 3. The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories -- Ken Liu. 4. The Nothing Man -- Catherine Ryan Howard. 5. Netherland -- Joseph O'Neill. 6. The Thursday Murder Club -- Richard Osman. 7. The Bear Came Over the Mountain -- Alice Munro. 8. Runaway -- Alice Munro. 9. Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage -- Alice Munro. 10. All Alice Munro's books on Amazon. 11. How to Make the World Add Up -- Tim Harford. 12. Archives of Dear Economist. 13. Dear Undercover Economist -- Tim Harford. 14. Collected Poems -- Mark Strand. (A sample.) 15. The Best of It: New and Selected Poems -- Kay Ryan. 16. The Housekeeper and the Professor -- Yoko Ogawa. 17. The Blank Slate -- Steven Pinker. 18. How Innovation Works -- Matt Ridley. 19. The Innovator's Dilemma -- Clayton M Christensen. 20. The Myth of Basic Science -- Matt Ridley. 21. The Evolution of Everything -- Episode 96 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Matt Ridley). 22. That Which is Seen, and That Which is Not Seen -- Frédéric Bastiat. 23. The Law -- Frédéric Bastiat. 24. The Deficit Myth -- Stephanie Kelton. 25. Rathin Roy's sarcy tweet. 26. That Will Be England Gone -- Michael Henderson. 27. Essays -- George Orwell. 28. Politics and the English Language -- George Orwell. Amit and Vivek will continue to do whatever else they are doing. You can keep listening to Amit's podcast, The Seen and the Unseen, and reading The India Uncut Newsletter. Do also check out his online course, The Art of Clear Writing. Vivek writes regularly at vivekkaul.com. Do browse all his books on Amazon or elsewhere.
31 min
The Vergecast
The Vergecast
The Verge
Quibi is shutting down / Google faces antitrust charges / Foxconn’s LCD factory is Wisconsin isn’t real
Dieter Bohn and Nilay Patel talk to Julia Alexander about Quibi shutting down, Adi Robertson about the US government filing antitrust charges against Google, and Josh Dzieza about his report on Wisconsin's empty Foxconn factory. Stories from this week: The ambitious effort to piece together America’s fragmented health data  Microsoft wants to cut down pollution from its business travel   Is Quibi done for? Quibi is shutting down 11 reasons why Quibi crashed and burned in less than a year Quibi’s top executives are ready to blame themselves, not just the pandemic, for Quibi failing Watch AOC play Among Us live on Twitch with HasanAbi and Pokimane The US government has filed antitrust charges against Google Who is Google’s market power hurting? Senate committee approves subpoenas for Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey How to retweet using Twitter’s new temporary format Republican lawmakers are furious after Twitter asks users to read stories before retweeting Facebook’s independent oversight board is now accepting cases The 8th Wonder of the World Exclusive: Wisconsin report confirms Foxconn’s so-called LCD factory isn’t real Apple iPad Air (2020) review: take it from the Pro Amazon Echo (2020) review: music of the sphere Beats Flex review: wireless earbud basics done right Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 26 min
The Art of Manliness
The Art of Manliness
The Art of Manliness
#654: How to Astronaut
If you grew up in the ‘80s like me, there's a good chance you really wanted to go to space camp and you really wanted to be an astronaut. You probably had a lot of questions about what it was like to live in space, and if those questions were never answered (or you've forgotten the answers), my guest today can tell you everything you ever wanted to know. His name is Colonel Terry Virts and he's been to space twice, the second time serving as commander of the International Space Station for 200 days. Terry also helped film the IMAX movie A Beautiful Planet, and is the author of How to Astronaut: An Insider's Guide to Leaving Planet Earth. Terry and I begin our conversation with the plan he set in childhood to become an astronaut via going to the Air Force Academy and becoming a pilot. We talk about how long it took him to make it to space once he joined NASA, the training he underwent for years which required being a skill-acquiring polymath, and how aspects of that training, which included flying jets and wilderness survival courses, didn't always directly correlate to his job as an astronaut, but were still essential in being adept at it. We also discuss the physical training Terry did both before his missions and after leaving the earth, and whether he suffered any long-term health issues from being in space. From there we get into what a typical day is like when you're floating through sixteen sunsets, including what space food looks like these days and whether they’re really eating "astronaut ice cream" up there, what it's like to sleep while weightless, and of course, that most burning of questions, "How do you go the bathroom in space?" We then discuss the importance of emotional and mental skills when you're living for months at a time in a space station, and what it was like to leave that station to take a spacewalk and see the earth from above. We end our conversation with how Terry physically and psychologically adjusted to returning to earth, whether he yearns to go back up again, and what he thinks the future of space exploration holds. Consider this show the stint at space camp your parents never signed off on. Get the show notes at aom.is/astronaut. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
47 min
Bharatvaarta
Bharatvaarta
Bharatvaarta
#58 - The Extraordinary Epoch of Nanasaheb Peshwa | Uday Kulkarni | Amit Paranjape
Dr Uday Kulkarni is an author of five excellent books on 18th century Maratha history. He is an AFMC, Pune graduate and a retired navy surgeon. Dr Kulkarni started writing about Maratha history a decade back, while still practicing medicine.    His first book Solstice at Panipat, describing the 1761 Panipat War, released in 2011 on 250th anniversary of what perhaps is the most significant war in Indian history. He followed it with Bakhar of Panipat (2014), The Era of Baji Rao (2016) and James Wales: Artist & Antiquarian in the time of Peshwa Sawai Madhavrao (2019).   The Extraordinary Epoch of Nanasaheb Peshwa is his fifth book covering the life and times of Nanasaheb, appointed as Peshwa in 1740 by Chhatrapati Shahu, after the untimely death of Peshwa Baji Rao. This book is not a biography but rather describes the Maratha era leading up to the Panipat War and the year 1761 when Nanasaheb died.   In this discussion, we talk to Dr Kulkarni about this book, his passion for writing about Maratha history and the very intriguing 18th century India. He talks about how the British won over India from Marathas and not the Mughals - a little known fact of our turbulent past.   Amit Paranjape, the anchor for this conversation, is a Pune-based history buff and technology entrepreneur. Amit himself has deep knowledge of Maratha history and has helped Dr Kulkarni with the production process of his latest book. Amit also compered the book launch program, where Madhya Pradesh minister Smt Yashodhara Raje Scindia was the chief guest.
1 hr 2 min
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