Civics 101
Civics 101
Oct 23, 2020
Ask Civics 101: Why is our voting age eighteen?
5 min

We take it for granted that the voting age is eighteen in the United States, but it hasn’t always been this way. We lowered that age from twenty-one in the seventies — so does that mean we could lower it again? Who gets to make that decision? Ask Civics 101 is on the case.

The Takeaway
The Takeaway
PRX, WGBH, WNYC Studios
Domestic Violence Victims in the U.S. Are Lacking Resources During Pandemic
In a previous segment, The Takeaway discussed how during the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an increase in intimate partner violence around the globe including. So we turn to look at the situation here at home, in the United States. In our series Justice Delayed, we’ve been talking about how the pandemic has led to a backlog of court cases of all kinds. Some states shuttered courts altogether for a time, others opened them with specific kinds of cases taking priority, and others are only conducting proceedings virtually. That changing court landscape means more and more victims of intimate partner violence may be facing delays in their cases, and struggling to receive, or even to reach out for, the resources they need. To understand how survivors of domestic violence are affected by COVID’s impact on the courts, we are joined by Margo Lindauer, Director of the Domestic Violence Institute at Northeastern University School of Law. As we talk about domestic violence on the show, we want to remind you that if you or someone you know is affected by intimate partner violence and needs help, you can call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE for support in English and Spanish. Check out our 2020 election coverage here. Check out our series, "A Votar: A Look at Latino Voters in the 2020 U.S. Election," here. Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear this segment. Don't have time to listen right now? Subscribe for free to our podcast via iTunes, TuneIn, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts to take this segment with you on the go. Want to comment on this story? Share your thoughts on our Facebook page, Twitter, or Instagram.
10 min
The Chauncey DeVega Show
The Chauncey DeVega Show
Chauncey DeVega
Ep. 311: Ace Atkins on Race, Writing Bestselling Crime Novels, and the "New South"
Ace Atkins is a New York Times bestselling author whose novels include the Quinn Colson series and Robert B. Parker’s Spenser series. Atkins is a former newspaper reporter and SEC football player. His essays and other writing have appeared in national publications such as Time magazine and elsewhere. Ace reflects on the ghosts and demons of the color line in America and what the “New South” means to him. Ace also shares what he learned about life and the craft of writing through his journey from being a newspaper reporter to the author of bestselling crime novels. And he shares some hidden history about the true origins of Donald Trump’s “red hat” MAGA cult hate movement. Chauncey DeVega ponders the emotional valence of a Thanksgiving holiday in an age of death, economic calamity, Trumpism’s continuing assaults on democracy and human decency, and the hopeful possibilities of Joe Biden’s presidency. Chauncey also takes a culinary journey to the world of TV dinners in order to better understand why he hates the turkey that is commonly served on Thanksgiving. And of course, Chauncey DeVega shares an animal friends story about mountain gorillas, who like many humans on Thanksgiving day, enjoy singing and farting during and after they eat a tasty meal. SELECTED LINKS OF INTEREST FOR THIS EPISODE OF THE CHAUNCEY DEVEGA SHOW * In 1918, Thanksgiving celebrations upped the Spanish flu death count * We're celebrating Thanksgiving amid a pandemic. Here's how we did it in 1918 – and what happened next * What Are We To Do With All This Grief? * Michael J. Fox Reveals Painful Setback That Led to His 'Darkest Moment' Since Parkinson's Diagnosis * 31 vintage TV dinners: Fried chicken, turkey, pot roast & other fab frozen food, retro-style * Robot 'spy' gorilla records wild gorillas singing and farting, because nature is beautiful WHERE CAN YOU FIND ME? On Twitter: https://twitter.com/chaunceydevega On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chauncey.devega My email: chaunceydevega@gmail.com Leave a voicemail for The Chauncey DeVega Show: (262) 864-0154 HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT THE CHAUNCEY DEVEGA SHOW? Via Paypal at ChaunceyDeVega.com Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thechaunceydevegashow Please subscribe to and follow my new podcast The Truth Report https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-truth-report-with-chauncey-devega/id1465522298 http://thetruthreportwithchaunceydevega.libsyn.com/ Music at the end of this week's episode of The Chauncey DeVega Show is by JC Brooks & the Uptown Sound. You can listen to some of their great music on Spotify.
52 min
The Pulse
The Pulse
WHYY
The Puzzle of Personality
Are you an introvert or an extrovert? Open to new experiences, or comforted by routine? Shy or the life of the party? Figuring out what makes us tick is an important part of understanding how we function within our families, communities, and workplaces. Thousands of tests online promise to assess your personality — but what are they actually measuring? Where does personality come from, how does it form, and where does it live? On this episode, we explore the science behind how we become who we are. We hear stories about what makes for a healthy personality, how our brains betray who we are, and why we change depending on who we’re with. Also heard on this week’s episode: * Reporter Jad Sleiman explores how advances in brain imaging are bolstering the science behind personality research — including the famous “Big Five” personality test. Neuroscientists Colin DeYoung and Emily Finn talk test scores and brain mapping. * Countless self-help books promise to turn us into the kind of people we want to be. But what exactly is a healthy personality — and is it even possible to change? To find out, Alan Yu talks with Kristen Meinzer about what she’s learned from years of living by self-help books, along with psychologists Wiebke Bleidorn, Rodica Damian, and Brent Roberts about what science has to say about personality change. * Science historian Jonny Bunning discusses how humans have thought about personality across the ages, and how we’ve tried to measure it. We also explore how much of our personality comes from within, and how much is shaped by outside influences. * Science journalist Olga Khazan from The Atlantic talks about her new book “Weird: The Power of Being an Outsider in an Insider World.”
49 min
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