In The Thick
In The Thick
Dec 1, 2020
The Fight After
Play • 33 min

Maria and Julio welcome Zerlina Maxwell, host of "Zerlina" on Peacock, and Nathalie Baptiste, a reporter with Mother Jones. They talk about the latest on the coronavirus, President-elect Joe Biden's cabinet picks, and the havoc Trump is wreaking in his last days in office.


ITT Staff Picks: 


  • Nathalie Baptiste writes about the Trump administration's escalation of lame-duck executions — at a time when the death penalty is more unpopular than ever — in her latest for Mother Jones.
  • Arturo "Tootie" Alvarez writes, "Essential workers are not heroes who choose to sacrifice their health for their neighbors. It’s more accurate to frame essential workers as the neighbors we’re willing to sacrifice," in this piece for Latino Rebels.
  • ProPublica is tracking dozens of "midnight regulations" or policy changes from the Trump administration in its final days.


Photo credit: AP Photo/John Minchillo, File

 

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Intersectionality Matters!
Intersectionality Matters!
African American Policy Forum
32. If Hindsight Is 2020, Why Are We Still Not Saved?
In this episode, Kimberlé is joined by a panel of veteran UTB guests to unpack the learnings from a year of pandemic, political revolution, and purported racial reckoning. and to help envision a path forward as our nation reels in the aftermath of a white supremacist insurrection. As the panelists contextualize the events of January 6th through a critical race theory lens, they discuss how a national history of appeasing white supremacist interests and denial of racial terror have laid the groundwork for our present reality. Furthermore, they explore what the new Biden administration must consider in order to truly address white supremacist terror at its root. With:
 CAROL ANDERSON - Professor of African American Studies, Emory; Author, White Rage
 DAVID BLIGHT - Professor, Yale University; Pulitzer Prize Winning Author, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom ANOA CHANGA - Electoral justice reporter and organizer; Host of “The Way with Anoa” JOE LOWNDES - Professor, University of Oregon; Co-author of Producers, Parasites, Patriots: Race and the New Right-Wing Politics of Precarity
 Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)
 Produced by Julia Sharpe-Levine
 Edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine and Rebecca Scheckman
 Additional support provided by Myles Olmsted, Nicole Young and the African American Policy Forum
 Music by Blue Dot Sessions
 Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast
1 hr 7 min
Our Body Politic
Our Body Politic
Lantigua Williams & Co.
January 22, 2021: Congresswoman Maxine Waters on how the Democratic party moves forward, Black and Indigenous strategists demanding more from the government, and the biggest challenges facing the Biden-Harris administration.
This week, Farai Chideya and her guests discuss the new administration and the historic role of Vice President Kamala Harris. Democratic Congresswoman Maxine Waters discusses what her party wants to accomplish now that it controls the legislative and executive branches. Political strategist Glynda Carr of Higher Heights wants to elevate more Black women to political leadership roles. Activist and producer Sarah Eagle Heart examines what the Biden-Harris administration could do to address the needs of Indigenous communities. Plus, political journalist Errin Haines of The 19th and Jess Morales-Rocketto of the National Domestic Workers Alliance dive into the priorities, hurdles, and first 100 days of the 46th President and Vice President. EPISODE RUNDOWN 1:26 Farai Chideya talks to people in D.C. for the Presidential Inauguration. 2:52 Representative Maxine Waters describes the scene during the Capitol siege. 5:14 Representative Waters describes the inequalities that Black women like her experience in the many facets of society. 8:39 Representative Waters says she is elated about the organizing efforts in Georgia. 11:16 Having Kamala Harris as Vice President speaks to what is possible for Black Americans, says Waters. 13:16 Political strategist Glynda Carr talks about her efforts to get more Black women elected into leadership roles. 14:05 Carr breaks down the four pillars of Higher Heights, her organization that endorses and advocates to elect Black women into office. 17:10 Electing New York’s Attorney General Letitia James was a recent success story for Higher Heights. 21:40 The Covid update looks into the strategy to get Covid vaccinations to those who need it most. 23:13 Activist and producer Sarah Eagle Heart dives into her social justice work as a member of the Oglala Lakota Tribe. 26:03 Eagle Heart recounts her first time protesting a racist depiction of Indigenous people at a homecoming ceremony in her hometown, when she was a teenager. 28:13 When Eagle Heart approached top organizers of the Women’s March to point out the lack of Indigenous representation, she became part of the solution to amplify these voices in the movement. 29:21 If she was able to ask anything of Vice President Kamala Harris, Eagle Heart would want to be sure that the rights of Indigenous people are included in the new administration. 32:34 Our segment Sippin’ the Political Tea, looks back at a historic week with political experts Errin Haines and Jess Morales Rocketto. 33:58 Youth poet laureate Amanda Gorman was Chideya’s favorite moment of last week’s inaugural celebration. 36:39 Chideya takes her listeners to the streets of D.C. the morning of the Inauguration. 39:42 Morales Rocketto looks at some of the historic appointments to the Biden-Harris administration’s Cabinet. 43:14 Haines looks at how the media will shift its focus from President Trump to the Biden-Harris administration. 44:50 Although there is a new president, “Trump is gone, but Trumpism isn’t,” Chideya explains. 45:33 The Biden-Harris administration has promised to make sweeping reforms to immigration policy, Morales Rocketto says. 47:53 Haines questions how the Biden-Harris administration will tackle issues like systemic racism.
51 min
System Check with Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren
System Check with Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren
System Check
10: Political Violence Is No Anomaly in American History
Georgia made history this week: The state elected a Black Senator on Tuesday for the first time ever. Rev. Raphael Warnock, a Morehouse graduate who serves as senior pastor of the storied Ebenezer Baptist Church once pastored by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., will be representing Georgia in the Senate as soon as the results are certified. Along with the win of his fellow Georgian, Jon Ossoff, the Senate will effectively be in Democratic hands, as will the House and the Presidency. Sadly, a different kind of history was also made this week, when an angry, violent, mob of mostly white Trump supporters broke into the Capitol on Wednesday, smashing windows, destroying private offices and violating public spaces. With encouragement from the man occupying the highest office in the land, the mob forced our elected representatives to flee the House and Senate floors as they were undertaking the constitutionally mandated certification of the 2020 presidential election. The people who perpetrated this attack against our democracy were fueled by misinformation, much of it coming from the President himself: That dead people had voted, that voting machines had somehow switched votes, that the election was rigged and widespread fraud had handed Biden the presidency. But they were also acting on another kind of misinformation, another kind of lie—a lie that erases the genius and the contributions of Black people, a lie that ignores the fact that it was Black hands that made America what it is, that unpaid Black labor built the very buildings that serve as the seat of our democracy (https://www.aoc.gov/explore-capitol-campus/art/slave-labor-commemorative-marker) . They were fueled by the lie that is white supremacy. If we are to move beyond the gridlock that has been our political fate for years, we need to face up to this lie embedded deep within our entire public life. On this week’s show, your hosts Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren undertake a system check of the very foundation of our politics. Our guest and guide this week is Hasan Kwame Jeffries, associate professor of history at The Ohio State University where he teaches courses on the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements. He reminds us that the violence we saw at the Capitol this week is not an anomaly—in fact, political violence is what birthed this nation. The American Revolution, the Civil War, the brutal suppression of Reconstruction and the stiff resistance to the Civil Rights Movement, political violence has long been used to perpetuate white supremacy in this country. And too often, Black agency and emancipation has been bartered away to avoid further political violence. But Prof. Jeffries points us toward a way to hold people—whether they’re the people who stormed the Capitol or the politicians who egged them on—accountable for their political violence, and a way to recognizing and honoring the full contributions that Black Americans have made to our republic. Our final word this week goes to Professor Blair Kelley, Associate Professor of History at North Carolina State University. System Check listeners will remember Prof. Kelley from episode 2, in which she gave us a deeply personal perspective on voter suppression (https://www.thenation.com/podcast/politics/voting-election-electoral-college/) —this week, she reminds us of all the working class Black folks who have asserted their right to participate in a political system that more often than not thwarted and devalued their input. It is our task to honor their legacy. System Checklist Transforming analysis into action, the System Check Team gives listeners three action items this week: Take Action: The politicians who aided and abetted this week’s assault on democracy must be held accountable. Prof. Hasan Kwame Jeffries’s brother, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (https://twitter.com/RepJeffries/status/1347245549188239360?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet) , is one of a chorus of politicians who came out today demanding President Trump’s removal from office. Add your name as a co-signer of Rep. Cori Bush’s bill to investigate and expel members of congress who fomented the storming of the Capitol (https://gopcoup.com/) , and help shift the balance of power in the Senate, that most unequal of institutions, by telling your representatives to make Washington, DC the 51st state (https://statehood.dc.gov/page/contact-congress#/3/) . Get Informed: How do we fight misinformation? By educating ourselves. This week’s political violence didn’t come out of nowhere (https://www.thenation.com/article/politics/proud-boys-capitol/) , it’s a clear response to the progressive political gains made this year, facilitated by the work of Black women from Stacey Abrams all the way back to Fannie Lour Hamer (https://www.thenation.com/article/politics/black-women-voting-rights/) . Check out Prof. Jeffries’s moving TedTalk (https://www.ted.com/talks/hasan_kwame_jeffries_why_we_must_confront_the_painful_parts_of_us_history/transcript?language=en#t-95967) , mentioned in today’s show. Listen to Rev. Raphael Warnock’s speech (https://www.11alive.com/article/news/politics/elections/raphael-warnock-georgia-senate-runoff-statement/507-43edf954-2b32-4730-a035-fde09b50f2b5) after his defeat of Sen. Kelly Loeffler to learn how the son of a woman who picked someone else’s cotton could become a US Senator. Watch: And while you’re at it, treat yourself to Elizabeth Alexander’s full reading of “Praise Song for the Day” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vLBnFk-OFc) at the 2009 inauguration of Barack Obama. As always, we welcome your additions to our Checklist! Use our Twitter (https://twitter.com/SystemCheckPod) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/SystemCheckPod/) pages to add your comments, suggested actions, and organizations to support. And if you like the show, subscribe on Apple Podcasts (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/system-check/id1536830138) , Spotify (https://open.spotify.com/show/0vI1wNUVfYbZXMIM6nciaX?si=VoRgIzndRVG4Xw_rQNGKmQ) , or wherever you get your podcasts for new episodes every Friday. System Check is a project of The Nation magazine, hosted by Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren and produced by Sophia Steinert-Evoy. Support for System Check comes from Omidyar Network, a social change venture that is reimagining how capitalism should work. Learn more about their efforts to recenter our economy around individuals, community, and societal well-being at Omidyar.com (http://omidyar.com/) . Our executive producer is Frank Reynolds. Our theme music is by Brooklyn-based artist and producer Jachary (https://jachary.bandcamp.com/) . Subscribe to The Nation to support all of our podcasts: http://thenation.com/systemchecksubs.
35 min
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