Field Recordings
Field Recordings
Nov 26, 2020
Lake, Louga région, Senegal on 16th August 2019 – by Sami El-Enany
Play • 5 min
“A mind-frying congregation of vibrating exoskeletons, birds and mammals celebrating the gifts of rainfall around a newly formed lake in the Louga région of Senegal. These party animals were nowhere to […]
The Great Women Artists
The Great Women Artists
Katy Hessel
Rebecca VanDiver on Lois Mailou Jones
In episode 52 of The Great Women Artists Podcast, Katy Hessel interviews the renowned art historian Rebecca K. VanDiver on the trailblazing and legendary LOIS MAILOU JONES (1905–1998) !!!! [This episode is brought to you by Alighieri jewellery: www.alighieri.co.uk | use the code TGWA at checkout for 10% off!] Born in Boston, had her first exhibition aged 17, and found herself in the midst of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s, Lois Mailou Jones had an EXTENSIVE artistic career that spanned almost an entire century, and an oeuvre that ranged from traditional portraits, Haitian landscapes, to African-themed abstraction. Born to accomplished, upper-middle-class, professional parents in Boston, Jones spent her early years surrounded by the cultural elite on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, including sculptor Meta Warwick Fuller, a mentor to the young Jones and encouraging her to study in Paris. Continuously awarded scholarships to the School of the Museum of Fine Arts associated with the Boston Museum, the always highly determined Jones originally pursued textiles (however soon retracted after finding out that designers’ names weren’t recognised in the same as painters). An educator for nearly 50 years, she first got a job at PalmerMemorial School (which she would drive down to in her sports car, as well as coach basketball!), and in 1930 was personally recruited to teach at Howard University, the epicentre of Black intellectualism (her students included Elizabeth Catlett, and painter Alma Thomas was her neighbour in DC!). Spending many summers of the 1920s immersed in the Harlem Renaissance, between 1937–8 Jones ventured to Paris on sabbatical, where she adopted an impressionist-like style, painting ‘en plein air’. Like so many of her contemporaries of the Harlem Renaissance, Jones felt welcome as an artist in Paris. Developing her negotiations with African themes in her work, such as Les Fetiches, 1937, a small painting of African masks, it was on her return to America that she was encouraged by Harlem Renaissance gatekeeper, Alain Locke, to further embrace the everyday life of African American people. Honoured by numerous presidents, granted a Lois Mailou Jones Day AND Avenue in America, it wasn't until her elderly age that she took America by storm. And WOW. Has she had an impact on American art. ENJOY!!!! Rebecca K Vandiver is a RENOWNED scholar, and has just written a book on LMJ! See here: https://www.waterstones.com/book/designing-a-new-tradition/rebecca-vandiver//9780271086040 FURTHER LINKS! https://www.rebeccavandiver.com/ https://americanart.si.edu/artist/lo%C3%AFs-mailou-jones-5658 https://nmwa.org/art/artists/lois-mailou-jones/ https://hyperallergic.com/600201/lois-mailou-jones-an-artist-and-educator-who-made-history/ Follow us: Katy Hessel: @thegreatwomenartists / @katy.hessel Sound editing by Laura Hendry  Artwork by @thisisaliceskinner Music by Ben Wetherfield https://www.thegreatwomenartists.com/
51 min
The Anthill
The Anthill
The Conversation
Recovery part six – 2008 financial crisis and lessons for today
The 2008 financial crisis resulted in the worst global recession since the second world war. The collapse of US investment bank Lehman Brothers in September 2008 caused a meltdown of the global financial system. Money markets froze and there was a major credit crunch as the ability to borrow money suddenly dried up.  To stop contagion and make sure other major financial institutions didn’t collapse, governments stepped in to shore up the system by bailing out the banks. Anastasia Nesvetailova, professor of international political economy at City, University of London, explains what these bailouts involved and why they were so necessary.  Aidan Regan, associate professor at University College Dublin, tells us how the crisis spread across the eurozone and why some countries rebounded a lot more quickly than others. We also discuss how the austerity policies that many governments adopted following the 2008 financial crisis hampered economic growth.  And we explore how emerging markets such as Brazil and China were affected by the 2008 financial crisis. Carolina Alves, fellow in economics at the University of Cambridge, outlines how they were shielded from some elements of the crisis but also left vulnerable to the large reduction in finance that followed.  You can read more research into the 2008 financial crisis and what lessons we can learn from it for today's coronavirus recovery alongside other articles in our Recovery series, which accompany this podcast. This episode was produced by Gemma Ware and Annabel Bligh, with sound design by Eloise Stevens. The Anthill is a podcast from The Conversation UK. We’re an independent news media outlet that exists purely to take reliable, informed voices direct to a wide audience. If you’re able to to support our work, please consider donating via our website. Thanks to everyone who has already done so. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
42 min
Baha'i Blogcast with Rainn Wilson
Baha'i Blogcast with Rainn Wilson
Baha'i Blogcast with Rainn Wilson
Episode 60: Nanabah Bulman
Hello and welcome to the Baha’i Blogcast with me your host, Rainn Wilson. In this series of podcasts I interview members of the Baha’i Faith and friends from all over the world about their hearts, and minds, and souls, their spiritual journeys, what they’re interested in, and what makes them tick. In this episode, I'm joined via zoom by the wonderful Nanabah Bulman, a Navajo Baha'i who's been actively engaged in service to her people, especially with the youth. Nanabah tells us about life on the reservation, and shares Navajo culture and beliefs, and what we can learn from the Native Americans. She tells us the Navajo legend of the Twin Brothers, and explains how she strives to live up to the meaning of her name. I hope you enjoy this awesome conversation! To find out more about some of the things mentioned and covered in this episode, check out the following links: * Watch this video featuring Nanabah and some of the Navajo youth service activities: https://bit.ly/38BHoky * Watch this talk by Nanabah: https://bit.ly/3oFBrZq * We mention the following: * Baha'i Year of Service: https://bahaipedia.org/Year_of_service * BOOK: The Covenant of Baha'u'llah by Adib Taherzadeh: https://amzn.to/3qdJIUF * The Training Institute: https://bit.ly/3qkIJSR * What is the Junior Youth Spiritual Empowerment Program? (JYSEP): - ARTICLE: https://www.bahaiblog.net/junior-youth/ - VIDEO: https://bit.ly/35E2EUW * The Baha’i Covenant: https://bit.ly/3qifqAq * Listen to these Baha'i Blogcast episodes featuring Native American guests: - Kevin Locke: https://bit.ly/3nH4MkR - Anisa & Doug White: https://bit.ly/3qgDL9u * I talk about the passing of my father, which I discuss on Baha'i Blogcast Episode 54 with Sean Hinton (part 2): https://bit.ly/39vGzZA * Baha’i Concept of Life After Death: https://bit.ly/2LGL0Zs * Some Native American Prophecies & the Baha'i Faith: - ARTICLE: https://bit.ly/2XC9WUM - AUDIO: https://bit.ly/2LP5iji * Why Do Baha’is Say Allah’u’Abha 95 Times?: https://bit.ly/3skRGgJ * Obligatory Prayer: https://bit.ly/2XCdh64 * Importance of Service in Baha’i Faith: https://bit.ly/2XxBjiN * I mention my uncle Rhett Deissner, who was on the Baha'i Blogcast: https://bit.ly/3ikblsJ * The Four Valleys of Baha'u'llah: https://bit.ly/35SaWsv * Bicentenary of Baha'u'llah: https://bicentenary.bahai.org/ * Native American Baha'i Institute (NABI): https://bit.ly/2Ls04dI * Grand Canyon Baha'i Conference: https://grandcanyonbahai.org/ * Rainn's talk at the conference 'Empowering Youth': https://bit.ly/2XNWHk1 * The Tablet of Ahmad: Who Was Ahmad?: https://bit.ly/3by09ar * 114 Youth conferences around the world: https://bit.ly/38EquSn * QUOTE: "We cannot segregate the human heart from the environment outside us and say that once one of these is reformed everything will be improved. Man is organic with the world. His inner life moulds the environment and is itself also deeply affected by it. The one acts upon the other and every abiding change in the life of man is the result of these mutual reactions." -Shoghi Effendi * QUOTE: "We must build the capacity to truly hear and acknowledge the voices of those who have directly suffered from the effects of racism. This capacity should manifest itself in our schools, the media, and other civic arenas, as well as in our work and personal relations. This should not end with words, but lead to meaningful, constructive action." -National Spiritual Assembly of the Baha'is of the United States, 19 June, 2020 Be sure to subscribe to the Baha’i Blogcast for more episodes on: * YouTube: http://bit.ly/2JTNmBO * iTunes: http://apple.co/2leHPHL * Soundcloud: https://bit.ly/30dX0G4 * Spotify: http://spoti.fi/2IXRAnb If you would like to find out more about the Baha'i Faith visit BAHAI.ORG, and for more great Baha'i-inspired content, check out BAHAIBLOG.NET: http://bahaiblog.net/ Thanks for listening! -Rainn Wilson
1 hr 22 min
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
BBC Radio Four
Fit the Sixteenth
The episode begins with Arthur, who has been "diverted" by Agrajag, who claims that Arthur has killed previous incarnations of him hundreds of times. He also claims to have been the bowl of petunias that materialised into existence in Fit the Third. Eventually it transpires one of the deaths was at Stavromula Beta, where someone tried to assassinate Arthur, and he ducked, hitting Agrajag. Arthur however has never been there. Agrajag cries "I've brought you here too zarking soon", but decides to attempt to kill Arthur anyway. Arthur and Agrajag struggle, and Agrajag dies. Arthur escapes from the Cathedral of Hate, to which he had been diverted, by running into a passageway in the mountain. He notes that he has somehow ended up with the wrong bag—one he lost on Earth many years ago. He trips, and falls, only to discover that he is flying. He experiments with flying for a while, only to be hit in the small of the back by the party which Ford and Slartibartfast are attempting to enter. The party is flying as well, and Ford and Slartibartfast are on a ledge around the building, not being permitted entry due to the lack of a bottle. Arthur remembers that his bag contains a bottle of Retsina, and this gets them entry. They see Trillian and Thor at the party, where Thor is chatting Trillian up. They quiz people trying to find the Silver Bail, and discover that it has been instantiated as an award (a Rory) for the Most Gratuitous Use Of The Word Fuck In A Serious Screenplay. Before they are actually able to find it, the Krikkit robots appear, massacre the party-goers and take the Silver Bail. Arthur tricks Thor into walking out of the building by challenging him to fight, leaving Trillian with no choice but to come with them. The Krikkitmen now have all the parts of the Wikkit Key, and Slartibartfast notes that their next move must be to go to the Wikkit Gate itself and try to intervene.  Broadcast on BBC Radio 4, 12 October 2004 Cast: *     The Book: William Franklyn  *     Arthur Dent: Simon Jones  *     Ford Prefect: Geoffrey McGivern  *     Slartibartfast: Richard Griffiths  *     Trillian: Susan Sheridan  *     Thor: Dominic Hawksley  *     Agrajag: Douglas Adams  *     Award winner: Bob Golding  *     Woman with the Sydney Opera House Head: Joanna Lumley  *     Party Doorman: Paul Wickens  *     Announcer: John Marsh
31 min
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu