How Did Sexual Identity Politics Win?
Play • 1 hr 4 min

In this episode of Life and Books and Everything, Carl Trueman joins Kevin, Justin, and Collin to discuss his latest book, published by Crossway, which analyzes the development of the sexual revolution as a symptom—rather than the cause—of the human search for identity. You’ll also learn the benefit for Christians of reading Nietzsche and Freud, and what you can say to someone when there isn’t time to debate the philosophy of gender.   

Timestamps: 

Thirty-second long book title [00:55 – 1:25] 

If identity is sexual, then sex is political. [1:25 – 7:37] 

Behaviors demand toleration; identity demands recognition. [7:37 – 13:39] 

Grappling with the history of ideas [13:39 – 22:26] 

Intended audience [22:26 – 24:29] 

Why Carl wants to be called a bigot [24:29 – 28:32] 

Should pastors read these non-Christian authors? [28:32 – 34:18] 

Is Protestantism to blame for sexual identity politics? [34:18 – 44:48] 

Natural law will help us communicate to younger generations. [44:48 – 50:55] 

What can you say to the other side when there isn’t time to debate? [50:55 –
56:16] 

Against lament? [56:16 – 57:50] 

Family shapes theology. [57:50 – 1:03:00] 

Books and Everything: 

The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self: Cultural Amnesia, Expressive
Individualism, and the Road to Sexual Revolution, by Carl R. Trueman 

Civilization & Its Discontents, by Sigmund Freud 

The Triumph of the Therapeutic, by Philip Rieff 

Living in God's Two Kingdoms: A Biblical Vision for Christianity and Culture,
by David VanDrunen 

Hands Across the Aisle 

The Fury of the Fatherless,” by Mary Eberstadt, First Things  

Gospelbound
Gospelbound
The Gospel Coalition, Collin Hansen
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If I want to read anyone’s reflections on recent years, it’s Russell Moore. The president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the SBC hasn’t been as visible or vocal as he was before 2017, at least until the last week following the attack on the U.S. Capitol. But his newest book, _The Courage to Stand: Facing Your Fear Without Losing Your Soul_, published by B&H, is even better than a tell-all memoir. It’s a grace-infused reflection on where and how to stand tall when it feels like the world is going to crush you. Moore says, “The courage to stand is the courage to be crucified.” Indeed, Jesus sets the tone for this book. And if you’re going to worship and follow a Savior who submitted to the cross, you’re not going to follow the world’s typical mode of courage. I see this book as seeking to reclaim Jesus, or at least his reputation and authority, among evangelicals. Moore observes, “An entire generation is watching what goes on under the name of American religion, wondering if there is something real to it, or if it is just another useful tool to herd people, to elect allies, to make money.” Elsewhere he writes, “I’m not surprised now when I see Jesus used as a mascot to prop up some identity politics or power agenda, or even to cover up private immorality or public injustice.” We’ve seen that recently with the Jericho March, and then the protests-turned-attack at the Capitol. Moore joins me on Gospelbound to tell us what scares him, how to lead when no one seems to be following, ambition masquerading as conviction, and much more. This episode of Gospelbound is sponsored by The Good Book Company, publisher of _Meals with Jesus _by Ed Drew. These simple 10-minute family devotions in Luke’s Gospel explore Jesus’ character through nine meals that he shared with people. More information at thegoodbook.com.
50 min
As In Heaven
As In Heaven
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What’s at Stake?: Gospel Opportunities and Implications
In this episode of As In Heaven, hosts Jim Davis and Mike Aitcheson welcome Soong Chan-Rah to discuss reclaiming the church from cultural captivity and the specific ways that Western attitudes of individualism have crept into our modern ministry philosophies. Rah shares insights regarding the ethics of the kingdom and paints a picture of hopes and dreams for the future. Rah focuses on the positive gospel opportunities in addressing race and justice with kingdom ethics. * An introduction to Soong Chan-Rah (:58) * Cultural shifts in objections to the gospel (2:54) * The significance of minority leadership in this shift (9:43) * The Next Evangelicalism: Freeing the Church From Western Cultural Captivity (13:27) * “Captivity” in the conversation (17:11) * Advice for church leadership in these conversations (21:14) * “Aren’t we pas this now?” (28:10) * How important it is for the church to get this cultural moment right (33:55) * What happens when churches dismiss these cultural conversations (37:59) * The church’s two minute drill (42:44) * Hopeful realism (49:21) Explore more from TGC on the topic of race.DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: * What are some biblical truths that the church stands by that you see the church as failing to live into? * What does it mean that we should embrace “the full biblical narrative”? In the arc of that narrative, which parts of the narrative do you see yourself latching on to more easily? * What are ways that the church has gone into “captivity” to western values? What are ways you have seen this in our bible reading? In our community life? In Christian engagements with social issues? * What are ways that we can remember the sins of our past corporately in regard to how the church has engaged with minority racial groups? What gospel hope does Jesus offer in our remembering? * What are your hopes for the future of the Western Church? How do you hope to see the church embrace values that are biblical, rather than cultural? What would that look like for your local church?
53 min
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