101 Cathryn Couch served 1m medically tailored meals to low income people with health challenges
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Food is medicine but could also be poison says Cathryn Couch,  founder and CEO for Ceres Community Project, who has served over 1m organic medically tailored meals to low income people struggling because of a health challenge.

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Ceres Community Project is a non-profit organization working to foster health by connecting people to one another and to a healthier food system.

More about this episode on https://investinginregenerativeagriculture.com/cathryn-couch.

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Regenerative Skills
Regenerative Skills
Abundant Edge
The Future of Regenerative Agriculture, expert panel 1
Welcome to the first edition of our monthly expert panels. This first edition starts off strong by addressing one of the most talked about issues of our time; understanding the future of regenerative agriculture. For this panel I teamed up with my friends and collaborators at Climate Farmers. Together we're working to advance regenerative agriculture in Europe. For this panel we assembled and all-star list of some of the most prominent voices in the movement today. Benedikt Bösel joining us from Germany, is the managing director of Gut&Bösel, board member of Soil Alliance, Chairman of the AgTech platform Bundesverband Deutsche Startups e.V.Richard Perkins, joining us from Sweden, is the co-owner and director of Ridgedale Permaculture and leading expert and educator on small scale regenerative agriculturePatrick Worms, joining us from Belgium, is the Senior Science Policy Advisor at World Agroforestry, President of the European Agroforestry Federation, and trustee of the International Union of Agroforestry Today we’ll be exploring the potential of regenerative agriculture. Not only to address and reverse many of the environmental problems we face around the world, but also revive local economies, improve our health, and reconnect us to the ecologies that we depend on as our natural roles as stewards of the land. We’ll also look into some of the important actions we must take to shift the farming industry as well as identify hurdles that must be overcome. Lastly we'll dive into how all of us listening can take part in this transition to a regenerative farming future. Don't forget that these podcasts are just the beginning. The discussion continues on our dedicated Discord server. Join the discord discussion channel to answer the weekly questions and learn new skills with the whole community Links: https://www.ridgedalepermaculture.com/# https://www.gutundboesel.org/ https://worldagroforestry.org/ If you enjoyed this — or any! — episode of the Regenerative Skills podcast, please leave a review of the show! Reviews help boost the show in rankings, which makes it more visible… and that means more listeners! It’s a great way to spread the word about Regenerative Skills!
1 hr 3 min
Soil Sense
Soil Sense
NDSU Extension
Grazing Livestock for Soil Health
For many farmers on this journey to improve their soil health, incorporating livestock is something they hope to do in the future. This can and will introduce a whole new layer of complexity into the system. How many cattle are appropriate? What will they need in terms of fencing, water, etc.? What will the benefits be to the land? What should be considered in an economic arrangement with a rancher? These were some of the questions discussed on our grazing panel at the _DIRT Workshop_. Today you’ll hear from: * _Dr. Kevin Sedivec_, Extension Rangeland Management Specialist at North Dakota State University Extension and Director of the Central Grasslands Research Extension Center * _Dr. Miranda Meehan_, Extension Livestock Environmental Stewardship Specialist also at NDSU * _Jerry Doan_, rancher from McKenzie, ND Also on this panel was _Mary Keena_, Extension Livestock Environmental Management Specialist at NDSU. But you won’t hear from Mary today, as we’re going to do a full episode with her on compost and manure later in this season. “Just the idea of the hoof action and the urine and the manure that creates this different micro-population that adds a new value and a new component that then benefits your soil microbic population, which then helps you break down and create more organic matter in time. So livestock to me is one of those tools that in my opinion has been a no brainer to add. It's a quick way to add economic return on that land base.” - Dr. Kevin Sedivec Dr. Sedivec goes on to highlight that long term management adjustments should be seen as a long term investment. “Don’t expect to see dollar savings the first year you do this.”  Continuing soil health practices and incorporating livestock over multiple years will provide the best benefit for producers. Admittedly, it is a complicated process to isolate the value the livestock bring to the cropping system and the cropping system brings to the livestock. Dr. Miranda Meehan is involved in research to better define and answer that problem.  Her studies focus on the “carrying capacity” of fields that incorporate the type of cattle to be added, the life-stage they are in, the length of time for grazing and the amount of cover crop residue the producer wants to maintain. She also offers how to choose the appropriate cover crop mixture that works well for your operation and helps “increase nutritional quality and maintain the nutritional plain” for the grazing livestock. “You know, people ask me all the time, can I build soil health without livestock? And I say, yeah, sure, you can, but you'll get there 10 times faster with livestock.” - Jerry Doan Doan’s operation has three main goals at the moment; trying to reduce winter feed costs, increasing the soil health of his crop lands and incorporating wildlife preservation into his operation. Doan shares all the many signs he has seen on his land that indicate increased soil health including worm populations and better granulated soil. Connect with Soil Sense: * _Soil Sense Initiative _ Soil Sense Podcast is hosted by _Tim Hammerich_ of the _Future of Agriculture Podcast_.
30 min
Agriculture Today
Agriculture Today
Kansas State University
Grain Market Update… Low-pH Crop Soils Spreading Across Kansas
• The weekly grain market update • Escalating issues with low-pH crop soils around Kansas • Agricultural news, and the “Kansas Wheat Scoop” • Kansas agricultural weather… 00:01:30 – Grain Market Update: K-State grain market economist Dan O'Brien talks about this week's volatility in the grain markets and his latest take on the "battle for acres" between the corn, grain sorghum and soybean markets, during his weekly segment on the grain market trends. 00:12:57 – Low-pH Crop Soils Spreading Across Kansas: K-State crop nutrient specialist Dorivar Ruiz-Diaz talks about escalating issues with low-pH crop soils around Kansas: why that's happening, and what corrective actions producers should, and shouldn't consider, in addressing the problem....he also comments on responding to high pH soils through crop management. 00:24:22 – Ag News: The day's agricultural news headlines, and the latest “Kansas Wheat Scoop.” 00:32:38 – Kansas Weather: K-State climatologist Mary Knapp reports on Kansas agricultural weather. Send comments, questions or requests for copies of past programs to ksrenews@ksu.edu. Agriculture Today is a daily program featuring Kansas State University agricultural specialists and other experts examining ag issues facing Kansas and the nation. It is hosted by Eric Atkinson and distributed to radio stations throughout Kansas and as a daily podcast. K‑State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well‑being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K‑State campus in Manhattan.
40 min
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