Another Way To Elect A President: Election Follow-Up
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The War on Cars
The War on Cars
Proving Ground Media
Humane Streets with Anil Dash
In a sense, cars are a bit like the internet comments section of the real world. Driving, like leaving a reply on a message board or posting something on Twitter, can be done anonymously, dividing people from their fellow human beings and even leading to aggressive behavior… if not the complete corrosion of polite society. With custom details and bumper stickers promoting political ideologies and pithy slogans, cars are also outward expressions of personal identity… just like one’s social media presence. To unpack the similarities between the sprawling systems of online communication and personal transportation, Doug talks to Anil Dash, the tech entrepreneur and pioneering blogger who’s served as a sharp and thoughtful critic of the industry in which he has spent most of his career. Is a better, more humane internet possible? If so, what lessons can be learned for people who want safer, more humane streets? And what would Prince think? SHOW NOTES: Learn more about Anil Dash, including his love of bike sharing and his belief that, as a New Yorker, “there’s never been a better time to walk down the street.” Follow Anil on Twitter: @anildash “New York City Fit How I Thought The World Should Work.” (TransAlt) This episode was sponsored in part by our friends at Cleverhood. Get 20% off your purchase of stylish, functional rain gear designed specifically for walking and biking with coupon code WARONCARS. Support The War on Cars on Patreon for exclusive access to bonus episodes and nifty rewards like stickers and more. Get an official War on Cars coffee mug and other goodies at our new online store. Buy a War on Cars t-shirt or sweatshirt at Cotton Bureau and check out The War on Cars library at Bookshop.org. Rate and review the podcast on iTunes. This episode was produced and edited by Doug Gordon. Our music is by Nathaniel Goodyear. Our logo is by Dani Finkel of Crucial D. Find us on Twitter: @TheWarOnCars, Aaron Naparstek @Naparstek, Doug Gordon @BrooklynSpoke, Sarah Goodyear @buttermilk1 Questions, comments or suggestions? Send a voice memo of 30 seconds or less to thewaroncars@gmail.com. TheWarOnCars.org
52 min
An Intelligent Look at Terrorism with Phil Gurski
An Intelligent Look at Terrorism with Phil Gurski
Borealis Threat & Risk Consulting
Quick Hits 131 - No, the Capitol riot was not an 'intelligence failure'
Security intelligence agencies are damned if they do and damned if they don't. Stop an act of violence from happening and they are called overbearing: fail to do so and they are called incompentent. In this podcast Borealis pushes back that the US intelligence community 'failed' on January 6. *About the host Phil Gurski:* Phil is the President and CEO of Borealis Threat and Risk Consulting Ltd. and Programme Director for the Security, Economics and Technology (SET) hub at the University of Ottawa’s Professional Development Institute (PDI). He worked as a senior strategic analyst at CSIS (Canadian Security Intelligence Service) from 2001-2015, specializing in violent Islamist-inspired homegrown terrorism and radicalisation. ►Subscribe - https://borealisthreatandrisk.com/subscribe/ ►Check Phil's latest book ''When Religion Kills'' - https://amzn.to/2ALdpoG ►Website - https://borealisthreatandrisk.com/ ►Twitter - https://twitter.com/borealissaves ►LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/phil-gurski-8942468/ ►Email - borealisrisk@gmail.com Listen to my ongoing coverage of the Washington riots: *Listing the Proud Boys as a ‘terrorist entity’ is mostly about politics** *Phil Gurski | January 13, 2020 Those who keep us safe do not need a list to tell them whom and what to investigate. Listen to episode *Are we calling too many things ‘terrorism’?** *Phil Gurski | January 11, 2020 Terrorism means many things to many people and we may be heading down an unhelpful pathway Listen to episode *Once inside the Capitol, it was like a frat party** *Phil Gurski | January 8, 2020 Listen to my interview on Canada Now with Jeff Sammut Listen to episode
11 min
Upzoned
Upzoned
Strong Towns
The Problem with Creating “Slow Streets” Too Fast
In the first few months of the pandemic, many towns and cities moved quickly to create “slow streets,” streets that restricted vehicle access in order to make room for socially distanced walking, biking, play, etc. While the thinking behind those adaptations may have been justified, the speed with which they were implemented often came at the expense of meaningful public engagement and buy-in from residents. As Laura Bliss writes in a recent article for Bloomberg CityLab, slow streets have drawn “controversy, community resistance and comparisons with racist urban planning practices of earlier decades.” Bliss quotes Corinne Kisner, the executive director of the National Association of City Transportation Officials, who said, “I think there’s a tension between planners wanting to act fast, because their work is so critical to reduce fatalities and greenhouse gas emissions — the reasons for this work are so compelling and historic. But the urgency to move fast is in conflict with the speed of trust, and the pace that actually allows for input from everyone who’s affected by these decisions.” This article is the topic of this week's episode of Upzoned -- our first episode of 2021 and our 100th episode overall -- with host Abby Kinney, an urban planner from Kansas City, and regular co-host Chuck Marohn, the founder and president of Strong Towns. Abby and Chuck discuss why improving how streets and public spaces are utilized isn’t worth much if you get the process wrong. (“Robert Moses tactics can’t achieve Jane Jacobs goals.”) They also contrast the one-size-fits-all solutions that create resentment with the benefits of iiterative, truly collaborative approaches. Then in the Downzone, Chuck talks about finishing The Queen’s Gambit on Netflix and recommends a blockbuster new religion podcast by a hometown host. And Abby talks about why climbing is the best sport for understanding incrementalism. Oh, and also about skydiving, which prompted Chuck to recommend this video. Additional Show Notes * “‘Slow Streets’ Disrupted City Planning. What Comes Next?” by Laura Bliss * Robert Moses Tactics Can’t Achieve Jane Jacobs Goals * Abby Kinney (Twitter) * Charles Marohn (Twitter) * Gould Evans Studio for City Design * Theme Music by Kemet the Phantom (Soundcloud) * Select Strong Towns content on “Slow Streets” and “Open Streets” * “Oakland’s Open Streets Programs Are Still a Work in Progress. That’s a Good Thing.” by Daniel Herriges * “The Bottom-Up Revolution is... Working Together to Make a Street for People” (Podcast) * “How’s that temporary street redesign your city started this spring doing now?” by Rachel Quednau * “The Evolving 2020 Open Streets Movement, or What if We Threw Out the Rule Book and Everything Was Fine? By Daniel Herriges * “Hearing One Engineer's Call to "Sit in the Ambiguity" of Transportation Planning,” by Daniel Herriges
30 min
Into The Grey Zone
Into The Grey Zone
Sky News
Episode One: The Gathering Storm
This episode seeks to explain what the grey zone is. It includes a warning from General Sir Nick Carter, the head of the UK’s armed forces, and Ben Wallace, the defence secretary, about the danger of ignoring attacks in this murky space, while Lieutenant General Graeme Lamb, a former director of UK special forces, warns: “We’re being boiled like a frog!” Sky News journalist Deborah Haynes then travels to Salisbury with the widow of former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko to visit the site of one of the most high profile grey zone attacks – the poisoning of another ex-Russian agent, Sergei Skripal, and his daughter Yulia. Lord Mark Sedwill, a former national security adviser, talks about how he led the UK’s response to nerve agent poisoning and the fake news that followed. Finally, Eliot Higgins, founder of the investigative website Bellingcat, describes how he and his team revealed the true identities of the Russian military intelligence officers named by the UK as prime suspects in the attempted assassination. Russia denies involvement. Interviews: General Sir Nick Carter, chief of the defence staff Ben Wallace, defence secretary Lord Mark Sedwill, former UK national security adviser, former cabinet secretary Lieutenant General (retired) Graeme Lamb, former director of UK special forces Marina Litvinenko, widow of former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko Eliot Higgins, founder of the investigative website Bellingcat Colonel Hamish de Bretton-Gordon, former commanding officer of the UK’s Joint, Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Regiment Credits Written by Deborah Haynes and Chris Scott Narrated by Deborah Haynes Edited and produced by Chris Scott Production support from Sophia McBride and Victoria Seabrook The head of Sky News Radio is Dave Terris
48 min
New Books in Political Science
New Books in Political Science
Marshall Poe
Jonathan Padwe, "Disturbed Forests, Fragmented Memories: Jarai and Other Lives in the Cambodian Highlands" (U Washington Press, 2020)
Cambodia’s troubled history has often been depicted in terms of conflict, trauma and tussles between great powers. In Disturbed Forests, Fragmented Memories: Jarai and Other Lives in the Cambodian Highlands (U Washington Press, 2020), Jonathan Padwe assembles this history from narrative pieces by and of the Jarai, an ethnic minority living in the country’s highlands. Demonstrating how landscapes and social formations simultaneously changed each other, the book takes a reader through the various historical conjunctures - the Jarai’s agency in opening up pre-capitalist resources frontiers; the colonial state’s attempted rationalization of the landscape through rubber enterprises; trauma and displacement during the Vietnam War and the Khmer Rouge regime and re-diversification of the scarred land in recent years. In the process of accessing these histories, the book analyzes forest biota and agricultural practices, enabling a new approach to conceptualizing landscapes that melds representation, materiality and ecology. In this episode, we discuss how to approach ethnography in inaccessible places, conceptualizations of nature-culture, ecological de-diversification and re-diversification and how bombs could be remembered as flowers falling from the sky. Jonathan Padwe is associate professor of anthropology at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. His research interests center on social and environmental change in mainland Southeast Asian uplands, issues of equity and equality in development and indigenous identities. Faizah Zakaria is assistant professor of history at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. You can find her website at www.faizahzak.com or reach her on Twitter @laurelinarien. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
51 min
Trend Lines
Trend Lines
World Politics Review
What the End of the Qatar Boycott Means for the Gulf
Flights between Saudi Arabia and Qatar are resuming this week and the land border has reopened between the two countries—signs of a thaw in relations after three and half years of acrimony. Last week, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt agreed to end a travel and trade blockade they had imposed on Qatar in 2017. Those four countries, calling themselves the “anti-terror quartet,” had accused Qatar of supporting radical Islamist groups, among other charges. The crisis had divided the six-member Gulf Cooperation Council, or GCC, and the United States had lobbied extensively for an end to the blockade. But according to Sanam Vakil, the deputy director of the Middle East and North Africa Program at Chatham House in London, there remains a lot of work to do for the GCC to rebuild trust and address the disputes that caused relations to break down in the first place. This week on Trend Lines, Vakil joins WPR’s Elliot Waldman to discuss the lingering divisions and mistrust among Gulf countries Relevant Articles on WPR: Are Saudi Arabia and Its Gulf Neighbors Close to Ending the Qatar Boycott? What Does Disarray in the Gulf Mean for the GCC? Qatar’s Exit From OPEC Could Exacerbate a Rift Among Its Members Turkey Rolls the Dice by Supporting Qatar in Its Feud With Saudi Arabia Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie. To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.
35 min
New Books Network
New Books Network
Marshall Poe
Bruce B. Lawrence, "The Bruce B. Lawrence Reader: Islam Beyond Borders" (Duke UP, 2021)
For more than four decades, Bruce Lawrence’s multivalent and fulsomely prolific scholarship has influenced and imprinted the Western study of Islam and Religious Studies more broadly in singularly profound ways. The Bruce B. Lawrence Reader: Islam Beyond Borders (Duke UP, 2021) edited and executed by Ali Altaf Mian brings together major texts and fragments from Lawrence’s intellectual oeuvre in a manner at once eminently accessible and pedagogically fertile. The Reader also includes a brilliant and extensive introduction by Ali Mian that presents a useful conceptual framing for approaching and benefiting from Bruce Lawrence’s intimidatingly diverse scholarship that ranges from medieval Muslim views on Hindu thought and practice, South Asian Sufism, modern fundamentalism, the Qur’an, and Islamicate art and aesthetics. A moving and intellectually enriching interview between Mian and Lawrence that explores the theoretical underpinnings and political manifesto of Lawrence’s illustrious career, and an equally moving and productive Afterword by historian Yasmin Saikia caps this treasure trove of a volume. The Bruce B. Lawrence Reader is sure to delight, captivate, and intellectually nourish scholars of Islam, religion, and indeed non-academics. It will also make a tremendous text to teach in various undergraduate and graduate courses. SherAli Tareen is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Franklin and Marshall College. His research focuses on Muslim intellectual traditions and debates in early modern and modern South Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 9 min
The Harper’s Podcast
The Harper’s Podcast
Harper’s Magazine
Complexity
Mike Pence is a pedophile who has been replaced by a clone. But Mike Pence also had the power to reject Electoral College votes and overturn the 2020 presidential election results. In April 2020, the U.S. military liberated 35,000 sexually abused children from hidden tunnels beneath Central Park. There’s a video of Huma Abedin and Hillary Clinton ritually killing a child for its adrenochrome. The pandemic isn’t real, and Bill Gates has created a vaccine that will change your DNA and control your mind. This is just a sample of QAnon supporters’ many beliefs, some of which openly contradict each other. As Hari Kunzru observes in the January issue of Harper’s Magazine, QAnon is less concerned with finding the root cause of society’s purported ills than it is with laying out, in ever more intricate terms and with ever more involved symbols, how entrenched those ills are. If the guesswork and speculation surrounding the Kennedy assassination provides a benchmark of popular American suspicion, then Q has “the feel of something new, a blob of unreason against which the Kennedy narrative seems quaint, almost genteel,” Kunzru writes. Various preconditions figure into the rise of Q at this historical moment—the aesthetics of contemporary political theater, the accelerant nature of the internet—but beneath them all is a human yearning for simplicity, for an incomprehensible world to make sense according to our preferred terms. In this episode, Violet Lucca talks with Kunzru, a novelist and Harper’s new Easy Chair columnist, about the antecedents and present-day mechanics of QAnon. They discuss the myths of its origins, its fraught internal logic, and its “impoverished understanding of how power actually works.” Read Kunzru’s column here: https://harpers.org/archive/2021/01/complexity-qanon-conspiracy-theories/ This episode was produced by Violet Lucca and Andrew Blevins
56 min
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