Decode Fintech
Decode Fintech
Feb 8, 2021
International Expansion 101 for Fintechs in Africa
Play • 28 min

What should you know before expanding your Africa-based fintech to more countries?

In this episode, we explore the art and science of launching financial service products beyond your home country, covering everything from how to choose which countries to expand into, to how to hire in different markets, and what to watch out for when incorporating the business.

Our guides through this topic are experienced operators with long experience in expansion: Wiza Jakalasi (Chipper Cash), Marcello Schermer (Yoco), Adia Sowho (ex-Migo), and Maria Rotilu (ex-Branch).

IN THIS EPISODE WE TALK ABOUT

0:00 — Introduction

2:25 — Why businesses expand into new countries

3:35 — Expanding for growth

4:00 — The importance of timing

4:52 — How to pick your next country

7:03 — Prioritizing business drivers

9:49 — The impact of regulation

14:58 — [Paystack Product Alert] Introducing Paystack's verification service paystack.com/verify

15:57 — Midway recap

16:34 — Navigating incorporation

20:02 — The role of relationships

21:55 — How to think about hiring

23:53 — The best part of expansion

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The Flip
The Flip
Justin Norman
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Payments on Fire®
Glenbrook Partners, LLC
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PwC's accounting podcast
PwC's accounting podcast
PwC
Forecast 2021: The “S” in ESG, spotlight on societal investments
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BT Money Hacks
BT Money Hacks
The Business Times
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12 min
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