Strict Scrutiny
Strict Scrutiny
Jan 20, 2021
Rinse & Repeat
Play • 1 hr 1 min

Leah, Melissa, and Kate are joined by Rutgers Law Dean Kim Mutcherson, host of “The Power of Attorney” podcast, to break down (FOR NOW) the Court’s recent grants, the decision in FDA v. ACOG, and to recap and preview some January cases.

Words Matter
Words Matter
Katie Barlow
Shirley Chisholm - Black Feminist Pioneer
As Black History Month ends and Women’s History Month begins, we wanted to honor a pioneer in the struggle for equal rights for both movements. Shirley Anita Chisholm was a politician, educator, activist, community organizer and author. Born in Brooklyn, New York in 1924, as a child during the Great Depression - while her parents struggled to make ends meet - young Shirley and her two sisters were sent to Barbados to live with their Grandmother. Long before the Civil Rights movement in the United States, young Shirley watched as her community advocated for their rights as she witnessed the Barbados workers' and anti-colonial independence movements. Chisholm would later say about her time on Barbados with her Grandmother: “Granny gave me strength, dignity, and love. I learned from an early age that I was somebody. I didn't need the Black Revolution to tell me that." In 1964, after nearly two decades as an educator and community activist, Chisholm ran for and was elected to the New York State Assembly. Even within the New York Democratic Party, Shirley Chisholm had faced resistance to candidacy based on her sex - so she took her campaign directly to women, using her role as Brooklyn branch president of Key Women of America to mobilize female voters. Four years later - in 1968, Shirley Chisholm became the first Black woman elected to the United States Congress, representing New York's 12th congressional district for seven terms from 1969 to 1983.  Her 1968 congressional campaign slogan was "Unbought and Unbossed" - which later became the title of her memoir and a documentary film on her amazing life.  On January 25, 1972, in a Baptist church in her district in Brooklyn - Shirley Chisholm became the first African-American candidate for a major party's nomination for President of the United States, and the first woman to run for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination. In her presidential announcement - she called for a "bloodless revolution" at the forthcoming Democratic nominating convention and described herself as representative of the people offering a new articulation of American identity:  "I am not the candidate of Black America, although I am Black and proud. I am not the candidate of the women's movement of this country, although I am a woman and equally proud of that. I am the candidate of the people and my presence before you, symbolizes a new era in American political history." Let’s listen to Civil Rights and Women’s Rights Pioneer Shirley Chisholm announce her candidacy for President of the United States.  Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/words-matter. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
14 min
Politics with Amy Walter
Politics with Amy Walter
WNYC and PRX
The Future of American Politics
After four tumultuous years of the Trump presidency, President Joe Biden promised to put the chaos behind him and return the country to normalcy. While dysfunction and partisan gridlock in Washington were amplified during Trump’s tenure, it existed long before he arrived. Even so, it’s clear that the political divide has become deeper and democracy is more vulnerable than ever. On the final episode of Politics with Amy Walter, Astead Herndon, national political reporter for The New York Times, Adam Serwer, staff writer at The Atlantic, and Susan Glasser, staff writer for The New Yorker, join Amy Walter for a conversation about the future of American politics. One of the takeaways from the 2016 election was to constantly question our assumptions about voting behavior. Democratic dominance in the so-called Blue Wall states of the midwest is no longer assured and neither is the GOP hold on states like Arizona, Georgia, and Texas. Even so, the assumptions about demographics, specifically the role that race has on voting preferences, continue. For years, conventional wisdom suggested that higher overall turnout would result in more wins for Democrats. And while Biden won seven million more votes than Trump, he only carried the electoral college by around 40,000 votes. Record turnout helped Democrats win in Georgia, but it also helped Republicans hold onto vulnerable Senate seats in Iowa and North Carolina. Chryl Laird, assistant professor of government and legal studies at Bowdoin College, Julia Azari, associate professor of political science at Marquette University, and Mark Hugo Lopez, director of global migration and democracy research at Pew Research Center, describe the nuances of the electorate and debunk the assumptions we make based on demographics. Politics with Amy Walter Theme: "Enter the Dragon" by J. Cowit is currently available for free here. Amy's Final Take I have had the great privilege and honor to host this show every week for the last 2 and a half years. And I am so very grateful to those who made this possible - WNYC, PRX, and the amazing team of professionals who work so hard on making sure that we get the best possible product on the air. Over the last few years, political reporting has become more about generating outrage than seeking to explain. Covering the loudest and most controversial voices, while ignoring those who are doing the work at keeping our democracy alive. The goal of this show was to be the opposite of all of this. We wanted to help people understand that politics wasn’t meant to be distilled in 140 characters. That curiosity is one of our most valuable - and underappreciated - assets. That doesn’t mean that I want politics to be neat and clean. It’s messy. And, that’s ok. The more voices in the mix mean that we are hearing from people whose stories were once left out of our political narratives. But, messy doesn’t have to mean dysfunctional. What we need more than anything in this moment is leadership. Instead of throwing up their hands and saying “well, it’s what people want” or “it’s what the market demands” leaders set boundaries and are willing to be unpopular for doing so. I also wanted every show to convey a sense of humility and empathy. To Accept that you don’t always have the answers or that sometimes the people you may not always agree with have some pretty good ideas. Covering this moment in American politics has been an amazing experience. Thank you for taking this crazy journey with me. And, while I won’t be at this microphone every week, I will be popping on every now and then to talk with Tanzina about politics and Washington. You can also catch me every Monday on PBS NewsHour or read my weekly column at CookPolitical.com. I leave you with this: our politics is only as broken as we allow it to be. Show up. Speak up. Listen more, shout less.
54 min
#SistersInLaw
#SistersInLaw
Politicon
5: #SistersAgainstSexism
Join the #SistersInLaw this week as they stand up for Neera Tanden and share their own experiences with sexism-- and how to beat it!  Then they take on the threats to voting rights facing minorities in our country and fill us in on the current efforts at suppression.  Can it be stopped?  If anything, the George Floyd Justice and Policing Act is a start towards tackling systemic racism, but there’s a lot more (legal) work to do! Get More From The #SistersInLaw: Joyce Vance: Twitter (https://twitter.com/JoyceWhiteVance) | University of Alabama Law (https://www.law.ua.edu/directory/People/view/Joyce_Vance) | MSNBC (https://www.msnbc.com/author/joyce-vance-ncpn1243130) Jill Wine-Banks: Twitter (https://twitter.com/JillWineBanks) | Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/JWineBanks/) | Website (https://www.jillwinebanks.com/) | Author of The Watergate Girl: My Fight For Truth & Justice Against A Criminal President (https://www.amazon.com/Watergate-Girl-Justice-Criminal-President/dp/1250244323) Kimberly Atkins: Twitter (https://twitter.com/KimberlyEAtkins) | Boston Globe (https://www.bostonglobe.com/about/staff-list/staff/kimberly-atkins/) | WBUR (https://www.wbur.org/inside/staff/kimberly-atkins) Barb McQuade: Twitter (https://twitter.com/BarbMcQuade) | University of Michigan Law (https://www.law.umich.edu/FacultyBio/Pages/FacultyBio.aspx?FacID=bmcquade) | Just Security (https://www.justsecurity.org/author/mcquadebarbara/) | MSNBC (https://www.msnbc.com/author/barbara-mcquade-ncpn1048426) Recent Articles By The #SistersInLaw: Kim’s Boston Globe Article  https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/02/25/opinion/after-brutal-year-garland-must-work-reform-doj-restore-black-americans-trust/?p1=StaffPage Email your questions to SISTERSINLAW@POLITICON.COM  (mailto:SISTERSINLAW@POLITICON.COM ) or TWEET them using #SistersInLaw and we’ll answer as many as we can.
1 hr 7 min
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