The on-purpose recession and women in the COVID-19 crisis
Play • 1 hr 2 min

On this episode, we chat with Katrine Beauregard and Marija Taflaga about the impact of the crisis on women, truth in political advertising, and political donations. In part two, Peter Martin joins us to talk about Australia’s recession and where to from here.


Officially in recession and with households holding onto their money at an unprecedented scale, what does the future hold for the Australian economy? What might happen if spending never recovers? And what impact will the crisis have on women's participation in the political system? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, we discuss Australia’s economic outlook with Peter Martin AM, Crawford School visiting fellow and Business and Economy Editor at The Conversation. Dr Katrine Beauregard and Dr Marija Taflaga also step up to the hotplate to chat about the impact of the crisis on women’s political participation, transparency in political donations, and truth in political advertising.

 

Peter Martin AM is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU) and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation.


Dr Katrine Beauregard is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her work focuses on political behaviour, and why people vote the way they do.


Dr Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


You can register here for the live virtual launch of Associate Professor Chris Wallace's new book, How to win an election, where Chris will be in conversation with Professor Mark Kenny.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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Policy Forum Pod
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21 min
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