Episode 46 — Dress for the returns you want, not the ones you have ...
Play • 38 min
Gaining insight about what the future holds, and the financial benefits that could come with it, takes more than hope and guesswork. In this episode of Investments Unplugged, Gertjan Van Der Geer, Senior Investment Manager on the Thematic Equities Team at Pictet Asset Management, joins the Capital Markets Strategy team to share his expertise and discuss:
•	how COVID-19 affects market trends
•	whether or not Bitcoin will gain traction as a future currency
•	emerging megatrends and investment themes to look out for
•	why thematic investing is the better approach to portfolio construction
… and more.
Money! with Stacy Johnson
Money! with Stacy Johnson
MoneyTalksNews.com
The Pros and Cons of Working in Retirement feat. Paula Pant
Not long ago, the phrase "working in retirement" was an oxymoron, much like "bittersweet," "act naturally" or "hot water heater." After all, if you're working, you're by definition not retired. But that was then. These days, working at least part-time while retired is increasingly common. According to one recent survey quoted in Forbes, 27% of pre-retirees said they planned to work part-time in retirement and among retirees, 19% are working part-time. Why so much working during retirement? More likely than not, because of money. As we explained in articles like 8 Reasons Your Parents Had an Easier Retirement Than You Will, pensions are rapidly disappearing, replaced by much less reliable accounts like IRAs and 401(k)s.  And as retiree income is falling, costs are rising. On the plus side, however, while more retirees may be forced back into the workplace to make ends meet, there are more ways than ever to bring in a bit of extra bacon. In short, in my parent's generation, retirement meant not working at all. But for us Boomers, retirement is morphing into something different. It's not about doing nothing. It's about being productive and making money, but by doing what you want to do, rather than what you have to do. What kind of work will today's (or tomorrow's) retiree look forward to doing? Will it be easy to find pleasant, lucrative work? Should we start long before we retire? In this week's "Money" podcast, we're going to find answers to these questions, as well as many more. Our guest is author and super-popular podcaster Paula Pant from Afford Anything. Smart, funny and knowledgeable, you'll have a good time listening to her. Want more information? Check out these resources: 7 Tips for Getting a Great Part-Time Job in Retirement 10 Stats About Working in Retirement This Job Board Specializes in Remote Work and Flexible Gigs 5 Reasons You Should Work for as Long as You Live 15 Jobs for Retirees That Can Be Done From Home 8 Signs That It's Time for You to Unretire AARP: Job Search Resources for 50+ Subscribe to the Money Talks News newsletter Take our The Only Retirement Guide You'll Ever Need course Take our Money Made Simple course Hosts: MoneyTalksNews MirandaMarquit.com Ask us a question Become a member: https://www.moneytalksnews.com/members/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
28 min
The Power Of Zero Show
The Power Of Zero Show
David McKnight
"From Forever Taxed to Never Taxed": My Interview with Ed Slott (Part 1)
Ed Slott has a new book coming out called The New Retirement Savings Time Bomb. It’s the updated version of the original book written 20 years ago where the time bomb was the tax building up in your IRA account. If you didn’t know how to plan, you could be hit twice and lose up to 80% and 90%. Some of the Estate taxes have gone away since then, but there are other new threats to your retirement savings than ever before. Congress always needs money, and they will always go for the lowest hanging fruit, which is your retirement savings. It’s like a deal with the devil, getting those deductions on the front end with the hope that you will be in a lower tax bracket. This assumption is where the danger lies. The Secure Act has ironically made your retirement savings less secure. The biggest threat is the elimination of the stretch IRA and the estate implications. Every plan needs to be reviewed and revised, maybe scrapped altogether for different thinking entirely. Congress needs money, which means tax rates are going to go up and that people will have less money in retirement. What is driving the need for these huge infusions of cash? Deficits and debts are the issue. The government has been recklessly spending for decades, and now it’s only increased with the effects of Covid-19. When most people think of compound interest, they think of how Albert Einstein is the 8th wonder of the world. It’s great when it’s working for you, but awful when compounding is working against you. Compounding debt is the real issue. The math doesn’t discriminate. The math bears it out that we will never see tax rates as low as they are today. We need a more stable and secure plan for the future. The history of tax rates shows that we could return to where rates were as high as 90% for the top tax brackets. You may only have one more year to take advantage of these historically low tax rates. People have to realize that they are in control of their tax rates. Taking advantage of the current low tax rates is the best tax planning you can do. Always pay taxes when the rates are the lowest. That may mean paying some taxes now, but you have to remember that taxes are a bill that won’t go away. The concern about losing out on compounding interest when converting to a Roth IRA is a myth. If you are truly comparing apples to apples, there is no loss when using the same rates of return and taxes, but if rates go up, then everything changes. When rates go up, everything tax-free becomes more valuable. When you have money in your IRA, it is accruing to the benefit of the IRS. When you convert now, you are claiming your portion of the money, as well as the future interest. Taxes have to be paid for. It’s not if, it’s when. Why not pay them while they are on sale? Even in the worst case scenario, by converting now you lock in a zero percent tax rate for the rest of your life, which is not a bad consolation prize. After the Secure Act, using a trust to protect your money after death is no longer viable. Regardless of what happens with tax rates, this is going to become a huge burden for a number of people, and this makes a permanent life insurance policy even more attractive. People don’t care about the vehicle. They want the results. They want low taxes, larger inheritance, and post death control, and a permanent life insurance plan that fits the bill. Mentioned in this Episode: The New Retirement Savings Time Bomb by Ed Slott can be pre-ordered on Amazon here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07TSZSSY5/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i0
28 min
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