Simplify
Simplify
Apr 23, 2020
Liz Fosslien: Work With Your Emotions
Play • 41 min

Why do we lose motivation in our jobs? How can we create a space of belonging and inclusion? What are the best ways to give and receive feedback?

Liz Fosslien answers all of these questions, and more, in this thoughtful and pertinent interview. As she reveals, emotions in the workplace are not only acceptable—they can actually be incredibly useful in decision making, making connections, and doing great creative work.

This interview is truly eye-opening in establishing how we can unite who we are with what we do, creating a positive working environment for ourselves and those that we work with.

For more info, including links to everything discussed in the episode, check out this link: https://www.blinkist.com/magazine/posts/liz-fosslien-simplify-work-with-your-emotions [2]

Try Blinkist for free for 14 days by going to [https://www.blinkist.com/simplify][3], tapping on Try Blinkist at the top right, and entering the code FEELFEELINGS. 

Let us know what you thought of this episode, or just come say hi on Twitter! Find Caitlin at [@caitlinschiller][4], Ben at [@bsto][5].

Simplify is produced by Caitlin Schiller with Ben Schuman-Stoler. Thanks to Ines Bläsius for editing & production assistance and Christoph Meyer for audio engineering chops. The new Simplify theme is by the one and only Odysseas Constantinou.

[1]: https://www.blinkist.com/en/books/no-hard-feelings-en

[2]: https://www.blinkist.com/magazine/posts/liz-fosslien-simplify-work-with-your-emotions

[3]: https://www.blinkist.com/simplify

[4]: https://twitter.com/caitlinschiller?lang=en

[5]: https://twitter.com/bsto

[6]: https://www.blinkist.com/magazine/posts/liz-fosslien-simplify-work-with-your-emotions-transcript

 

The Engineers Collective
The Engineers Collective
New Civil Engineer
The role of AI in the future of roads maintenance with FMConway and RoadBotics
The latest episode of The Engineers Collective looks at how artificial intelligence (AI) could transform how highway maintenance work is planned and prioritised.Joining NCE editor Claire Smith and features editor Nadine Buddoo special guests FM Conway consultancy director John Holliday and Roadbotics senior partner for success lead Stew Frick talk about the introduction of AI-led highway maintenance planning to the UK and discuss the challenges speed bumps and hot rolled asphalt initially presented to the task. John was instrumental in bringing RoadBotics to the UK and to date his team has surveyed more than 3,000km of road network on behalf of seven highway authorities including Highways England, Transport for London and the City of Westminster. Stew talks about the AI technology behind the system and the potential for it to be used on footpaths and feed into wider management systems in the future.The AI discussion follows on from a news update from Claire, head of content and engagement Rob Horgan and reporter Catherine Kennedy about futuristic and aspirational engineering projects that have been inspiring NCE’s readers in the last few weeks. The Engineers Collective is powered by Bentley Systems. Around the world, engineers and architects, constructors and owner-operators are using Bentley’s software solutions to accelerate project delivery and improve asset performance for transportation infrastructure that sustains our economy and our environment. Together, we are advancing infrastructure. Find out more at www.bentley.com
45 min
Education Bookcast
Education Bookcast
Stanislaw Pstrokonski
103. What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy by James Paul Gee
What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy is a book that I read early in my education research quest. At the time, I thought that it had interesting points to make, but I was unclear on quite how to react to it. After several more years of reading and research, it's clear to me that this book is deeply flawed. First of all, the author redefines "literacy" in a very strange way. He takes any form of semiotic system to count as a "type" of literacy. So, for example, if you know how to use a smartphone, then you are "literate" in the layout, symbols, and conventions of smartphone user interface. This is obviously not the kind of literacy that most people are interested on or concerned about, and it is less valuable than "conventional" literacy, partly because of barrier to entry (learning to read is relatively hard, learning to use a phone is relatively easy) and partly because of utility. Secondly, he coins a lot of new terminology for no apparent reason. During the recording I've had to translate some of his terms into more ordinary language, including the usual technical terms rather than his special ones. His terminology only serves to obscure his message and make it seem as if there is more content here than there really is. Finally, and most importantly, his central point is misguided. He essentially says that learning a subject is mostly about socially getting on in that world - knowing how to get on with other artists, mathematicians, surgeons, or whatever other skill "community", depending on the domain. However, this completely overlooks the glaring difference in difficulty between getting to know social conventions and attitudes of a subculture and learning the requisite knowledge and skills in order to be useful and productive in that domain, let alone to actually understand what is being said by other practitioners. The former takes a matter of weeks or months of acculturation, and the latter years or even decades of dedication. If we focus on the social context of knowledge rather than the knowledge itself, to coin a phrase, it would be like making beautiful light fittings for a house that you haven't built - pointless in the absence of the larger task that is left undone. Enjoy the episode. *** RELATED EPISODES Cognitive science (general): 19. Seven Myths about Education by Daisy Christodoulou; 52. How We Learn by Benedict Carey; 79. What Learning Is; 80. The Chimp Paradox by Steve Peters; 81a. The Myth of Learning Styles; 81b. on the Expertise Reversal Effect; 82. Memorable Teaching by Pepps McCrea; 85. Why Don't Students Like School? by Dan Willingham; 86. Learning as information compression Cognitive science (literacy-related): 41. What Reading Does for the Mind by Keith Stanovich and Annie Cunningham; 91. Vocabulary Development by Steven Stahl; 93. Closing the Vocabulary Gap by Alex Quigley; 95. The Reading Mind by Dan Willingham Expertise: 20. Genius Explained by Michael Howe; 22. The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle; 24. Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell; 49. The Art of Learning by Josh Waitzkin; 97. The Polymath by Waqas Ahmed; 98. Range by David Epstein Games and play (including computer games): 34. Reality is Broken by Jane McGonigal; 35. Minds on Fire by Mark Carnes; 36. Fun, Play, and Games; 37. A Theory of Fun for Game Design by Raph Koster Other fads / critical reviews: 42. Do Schools Kill Creativity by Sir Ken Robinson; 53. Brain-based Learning by Eric Jensen; 59, 60 on Brain Training; 62. Brainstorming makes you less creative; 65. Beyond the Hole in the Wall (on Sugata Mitra); 71. Visible Learning by John Hattie; 81. on Learning Styles; 87. Experiential Learning; 88. The Failure of Constructivist, Discovery, Problem-Based, Experiential, and Inquiry-Based Teaching
1 hr 30 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu