Visioning the Future - Fr. Tom Hurley & Rod Dixon 5.31.20
Play • 6 min

To the community of Old St. Patrick’s, 

Over the course of the past few years, it has become clear that we have both a challenge and an opportunity to be leaders in how we can make the church a sign of Hope and New Life for the world around us. Through encountering the people of our community and staff it was apparent that we needed a renewed articulation of our vision as a church community. A vision is a guiding, critical component of any enterprise that establishes what and who we intend to be in the future. It's a goal – attainable but challenging, measurable but mission-driven – that imagines what OSP can and will look like as we continue to follow our Mission. 

This months-long process took us through focus group sessions, board reviews, and countless feedback sessions with various stakeholders, from both the staff and the community. We are excited about using Pentecost to take the first step in rolling out this vision and we look forward to continuing this conversation over the following weeks and months. The full Vision document can be downloaded at oldstpats.org/vision. 

Our vision statement launches in the wake of the recent events in Minneapolis, and other high-profile incidents of police and civilian brutality towards African Americans, which call us to address the deadly virus of racism which also plagues our nation. We look to our mission in moments such as this to be informed, reassured, and galvanized. Transformative kinship, a key pillar of our vision, invites us to encounter and bear witness to the unimaginable hurt and trauma Black communities are holding right now. We are called to be in the business of creating change. We take this opportunity to denounce white supremacy and racism and we strive to recognize, acknowledge, and confront all manifestations of racism be they overt or covert. Guided by the gospels, we commit to being active agents of equality, justice, and change in big and small ways. 

In pursuing our vision, we must reimagine what it means to receive with open arms those who are institutionally marginalized or excluded. We know many people are looking for ways to act. Here are a few actionable steps you can take: 

In pursuing our vision, we must reimagine what it means to receive with open arms those who are institutionally marginalized or excluded. We know many people are looking for ways to act. Here are a few actionable steps you can take: 

- Sign the petition to pass new rules banning the use of no-knock raids like the one which resulted in Breonna Taylor’s death. (http://www.standwithbre.com/#petition)  

- Donate to the family of George Floyd. (http://www.gofundme.com/f/georgefloyd) 

- Donate to Ahmaud Arbery's mother. (http://www.gofundme.com/f/i-run-with-maud) 

Make a commitment to unpacking your own racial prejudice and bias by utilizing these resources: 

– Anti-racism Resources (bit.ly/ANTIRACISMRESOURCES)

–  75 Things White People Can Do for Racial Justice (http://medium.com/equality-includes-you/what-white-people-can-do-for-racial-justice-f2d18b0e0234)

– Tools for Talking about Race (http://nmaahc.si.edu/learn/talking-about-race/topics/being-antiracist)

 We say the names and hold up the memory of Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Tony McDade, and the countless other victims of white supremacy and police violence whose names and stories go unrecognized. May our vision be clear and guiding, that we might see the world through the eyes of Christ, stand with the marginalized, and serve a broken world – knowing that these lives matter. Black Lives Matter. 

Fr. Tom Hurley and the Staff of Old St. Patrick’s

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